The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "1500-1815"

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Your search for posts with tags containing 1500-1815 found 29 posts

Would Brazil be richer today if it had been colonized by the Dutch?

The Dutch began contesting Portuguese presence in both Asia (where they for the most part won) and the Americas (Brasil, where they eventually lost) from the early 1600s. The Dutch West Indias Company (WOC), which had as much capital as the more famous...
From: Economic Growth in History on 3 Jan 2022

Measuring the Great Divergence: A study of global standards of living, 1500-195

I’m delighted to announce that I have been awarded a large ESRC research grant for the project: “Measuring the Great Divergence: A study of global standards of living, 1500-1950”. A call for a postdoc will open soon. In this thread I briefly give...
From: Economic Growth in History on 20 Dec 2021

Call for papers: Early modern science, technology, and institutions

The University of Manchester Conference to be held at the University of Manchester Date: May 13, 2022 Conference title: Early modern science, technology, and institutions Keynote speakers: Debin Ma (University of Oxford) and David...
From: Economic Growth in History on 13 Oct 2021

The real effects of monetary expansions: evidence from a large-scale historical experiment

The main paper from my PhD dissertation is now forthcoming at the Review of Economic Studies. I explore the discoverycoau of rich deposits of precious metals in America in the early modern period as a natural experiment for random variation in changes...
From: Economic Growth in History on 30 Jun 2021

Book Review: The Corsairs of Saint-Malo

Disclaimer: the publisher, Columbia University Press, kindly sent me a copy of this book. Sometimes publishers send me copies; I do not always read or review the books, but if a copy was given to me I will write a disclaimer on top as I am doing now....
From: Economic Growth in History on 13 Apr 2021

Historical gender discrimination does not explain comparative Western European development

Historical gender discrimination does not explain comparative Western European development: This is what we argue in a new paper (joint work with Jaime Reis and Lisbeth Rodrigues). Also available as a CEPR discussion paper. Here’s the abstract:...
From: Economic Growth in History on 24 Mar 2021

Slavery delayed the industrialization of Brazil

Slavery in Brazil was only abolished in 1888. In a new paper we consider the relationship between slavery and development in 19th c. Brazil. The paper is forthcoming in Capitalism: A Journal of History and Economics. We show that despite its centrality,...
From: Economic Growth in History on 3 Feb 2021

The Bank of England and the British economy, 1694-1844

New working paper by Patrick O’Brien and myself, avaliable here (open access), and also as a CEPR discussion paper (gated), here. Not an ordinary bank but a great engine of state: the Bank of England and the British economy, 1694-1844 From...
From: Economic Growth in History on 22 Oct 2020

Monetary Capacity: some background

New voxeu column and accompanying CEPR discussion paper, covering my work in co-authorship with Roberto Bonfatti, Adam Brzezinski, and K. Kivanç Karaman. The paper touches a number of themes across economic history, historical political economy,...
From: Economic Growth in History on 27 Sep 2020

Why did Latin America fall behind and what explains its human geography?

Leticia Abad and I recently released a new paper, avaliable here, and which is going to be published as a chapter in an edited volume, Globalization and the Early Modern Era: An Iberian Perspective (eds. R. Doblado and A. Garcia-Hiernaux), Palgrave (forthcoming...
From: Economic Growth in History on 14 May 2020

“Standards of living in Europe’s Global Empires” session in the WEHC, Paris 2021

This session has been accepted to the World Economic History Conference, which will happen in Paris in 2021. Session title: “Standards of living in Europe’s Global Empires” Organizer: Nuno Palma (University of Manchester; ICS, Univ....
From: Economic Growth in History on 2 Mar 2020

Monetary Policy in Historical Perspective (16th-19th Centuries)

Monetary Policy in Historical Perspective (16th-19th Centuries) 16 October 2020, University of Manchester Organisers: Dr Stefano Locatelli (History, UoM), Dr Nuno Palma (Economics, UoM) This event (which I previously mentioned here) is sponsored by the...
From: Economic Growth in History on 2 Feb 2020

Call for Papers: Monetary Policy in Historical Perspective (16th-19th Centuries)

This has been announced in eh.net and elsewhere but I have not posted it here yet. The deadline is at the end of next week. I will post the program when we have it. Call for Papers: Monetary Policy in Historical Perspective (16th-19th Centuries) 16 October...
From: Economic Growth in History on 22 Jan 2020

Patterns of Iberian Growth in the Early Modern Period

New working paper: Patterns of Iberian Growth in the Early Modern Period, by myself and Carlos Santiago-Caballero. This corresponds to a book chapter which will come out in a Cambridge University Press book, An Economic History of the Iberian Peninsula,...
From: Economic Growth in History on 20 Nov 2019

Visit to the Quarry Bank Mill

As previously mentioned in this blog, every year I take my “Topics in Economic History” students to see the Quarry Bank Mill in Styal, close to Manchester. This year we visited under the expert guidance of Jamie Farrington, a History PhD student...
From: Economic Growth in History on 27 Oct 2019

Student post: Work as a measurement of wellbeing

Every year, I have been taking my 3rd-year economic history students to the Quarry Bank Mill in Styal.  My goal is that the students can actually see a bit of the the First Industrial Revolution, rather than just hear about it. Last year,...
From: Economic Growth in History on 29 Sep 2019

Comparative European Institutions and the Little Divergence, 1385-18

The Spanish Black legend (leyenda negra) survives. Let’s destroy it (well, part of it). In a new paper we show that English institutional divergence relative to the Iberian kingdoms started in the mid-seventeenth century, but not before. Iberian...
From: Economic Growth in History on 28 Aug 2019

On the discrepancies between the original Maddison dataset and more recent GDP reconstructions

Angus Maddison was one of the most cited economists of the 20th century. I often get emails asking me about Maddison’s figures, because I have worked a lot on historical national accounts reconstructions (see here, here, or here), and I was for...
From: Economic Growth in History on 27 May 2019

Money and Modernization in Early Modern England (forthcoming at the Financial History Review)

In early modern England, coin supply increased a lot without prices responding proportionally: This contradicts the Quantity Theory of Money, according to which the changes should move together. If the money supply doubles, prices should double too,...
From: Economic Growth in History on 7 Feb 2019

Roessner on culture and growth (Highlight III)

This post continues the “Highlight” series, which has previously included posts by Ridolfi and Malinowski. It has been written by my colleague Philipp Roessner, who is a faculty member at the History faculty of the University of Manchester....
From: Economic Growth in History on 23 Jan 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.