The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "1666"

Your search for posts with tags containing 1666 found 12 posts

A Tale of the Plague

William Harrison Ainsworth (1805–82) was an extremely popular author in the early Victorian period. Born in Manchester and originally destined for a career in the law, he was never the most devoted student and disappointed his family by pursuing a literary...

The Pentland Rising of 1666: Executed in Dumfries on 2 January, 1667 #History #Scotland

Two days after the executions in Ayr, two more Covenanters were hanged and beheaded in Dumfries for their part in the Pentland Rising of November, 1666. Their heads were exhibited at the mercat cross of Dumfries and were said to have been spiked on the...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 2 Jan 2019

The Pentland Rising of 1666: Executed in Edinburgh on 22 December #History #Scotland

Three days after four were executed in Glasgow for the Pentland Rising of 1666, six more Covenanters were hanged in Edinburgh. Six were executed in Edinburgh on 22 December, 1666: 19. Mr Hugh MacKail. a minister. He left behind an individual martyrs’...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 22 Dec 2018

The Pentland Rising of 1666: Executed in Edinburgh on 14 December #History #Scotland

A week after ten men were executed in Edinburgh for their part in the Pentland Rising of 1666, four more Covenanters were hanged in Edinburgh. Four* Executed in Edinburgh on 14 December, 1666. There is no gravestone for them, beyond the collective monument...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 14 Dec 2018

Londoners and the Great Fire: A Guest Post by Jacob F. Field

Londoners and the Great Fire by Jacob F. Field Pepys and his buried parmesan, Charles II and the Duke of York directing the fire-fighting efforts, Lord Mayor Bludworth saying (allegedly) saying ‘Pish! A woman might piss it out!’, Wren’s...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 22 Feb 2018

Everyday Heroes: A Story of Self-Sacrifice & Bubonic Plague

On 1 November 1666, a young farmer named Abraham Morten took one final, agonizing breath. He was the last of 260 people to die of bubonic plague in the remote village of Eyam in Derbyshire. His fate had been sealed four months earlier when villagers decided...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 6 Jul 2017

Nine Covenanters Buried at Glasgow Cathedral #History #Scotland

On a stairway down to the crypt of Glasgow Cathedral, is a gravestone to some of the Covenanters executed in Glasgow. The stone is hard to see as it is in a pretty dark spot. The Crypt was formerly the Barony Church that Donald Cargill was the minister...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 21 May 2017

The Beast, You Say? No, Sorry, Wrong Number

Happy New Year, everybody! And what an anniversary-rich year it promises to be, even in comparison with 2015 and 2014. The World War I commemorations will include the poignant centenaries of the Somme and Jutland; I hope to be involved in, or at least...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 4 Jan 2016

The Pentland Rising and the Killing of David Finlay at Newmilns in 1666 #History

At the beginning of his spiritual autobiography, James Nisbet recalls how his father, John Nisbet of Hardhill, took part in the Pentland Rising and what impact that had on his mother, Margaret Law, at their home near Newmilns in Ayrshire. ‘I was...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 31 Oct 2015

Review: ITV’s ‘The Great Fire’

ITV’s drama, The Great Fire, aired last night at 9pm in the UK. This morning, I was asked by many on Twitter for my opinions about this show, but as I don’t have access to live television in my house, I was unable to watch it last night. I...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 17 Oct 2014

The Great Fire of London, 1666

The Great Fire of London was one of the great catastrophes to hit the reign of Charles II. Following the horrendous Great Plague of 1665, the only silver lining in this conflagration is that it seems to have eradicated the plague. Great! But we don’t...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 3 Sep 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.