The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "18th Century England"

Your search for posts with tags containing 18th Century England found 20 posts

The Clerical Alphabet: Problems in Austen’s Church of England By Brenda S. Co

It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation.”—Edmund Bertram in Mansfield Park Richard Newton’s “Clerical Alphabet” satirizes the English...
From: Jane Austen's World on 9 Jul 2020

Twelve Unread Books: my New Year’s resolution for completing one each month in

Happy 2020 everyone.  In the spirit of learning more about Jane Austen and the world she lived in, I am determined to finish reading the 12 books highlighted in this post. I purchased most of these books years ago and have used many for reference....
From: Jane Austen's World on 27 Dec 2019

Greco Roman Influences on Women’s Hairstyles During the Georgian Era

In the past, this blog published several articles on hairstyles for men and women in the Regency era. This post discusses hairstyles in Georgian times. During a recent visit to the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, I had the pleasure of examining a small,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 23 Aug 2019

An English Wedding at Sherbourne Park by Rachel Dodge

…you want to hear about the wedding; and I shall be happy to tell you, for we all behaved charmingly.” –Emma My husband and I were invited to a family wedding in England last June. The venue: Sherbourne Park, a Grade II Georgian house...
From: Jane Austen's World on 1 Apr 2018

Ice Cream in July During the Georgian Era

Gentle Reader, This week marks the July 4th holiday in the U.S., which means family gatherings, outdoor picnics, firework celebrations, and, most of all, ice cream! This delicious treat became more and more common at the turn of the 19th century when...
From: Jane Austen's World on 3 Jul 2017

Cooking With Jane Austen

What can be a better way to celebrate fall and the Thanksgiving holiday than to examine a recipe or two from Kirstin Olsen’s 2005 book, Cooking with Jane Austen? – spending time with family and friends and sharing the food! I’ll just...
From: Jane Austen's World on 25 Nov 2015

Housekeeping in the Austen Household

Jane Austen’s family was not rich, by any means, but the family was genteel and belonged to the English gentry. Rev. Austen earned a respectable living as a rector at Steventon rectory. His wife, Cassandra, was a close relative of Theophilus Leigh,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 9 Nov 2015

Oh, What a Scandal! A Gretna Green Elopement, Marriage AND Divorce?

Another Elopement–A considerable sensation has been created in Dublin by the disappearance of the lovely daughter of Sir Thomas Butler, of county Carlow, with Captain Gosset, son of the Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant. An attachment had existed...
From: Jane Austen's World on 31 Oct 2015

Regency Fashion: Keeping Hems Clean

During the late 18th century, early 19th century, trains on gowns were de rigueur. I chose to show the two gowns below, since the styles were popular when Jane Austen was a teenager (first image) and wrote the first editions of Northanger Abbey, Sense...
From: Jane Austen's World on 12 Apr 2014

The Royal Kitchens at Kew

The Royal Kitchens at Kew were opened in May 2012 to visitors for the first time in over 200 years. They were virtually untouched since the mid-1700s, during the era of King George III. This introductory video, The Royal Kitchens at Kew: a food history,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 12 Mar 2014

Scenes of Everyday Life and People in 1790

I love this 1790 hand-colored etching by Thomas Rowlandson from the Royal Collection Trust, which depicts 12 vignettes of everyday life and work in Georgian England. Sketches like these offer us a glimpse of ordinary life in the 18th century, much as...
From: Jane Austen's World on 1 Feb 2014

Books to Purchase in the New Year and a Book Give Away

For winter reading in 2014, I'd like to recommend Jane Austen's England and Sense and Sensibility: The Annotated Edition as necessary additions in the libraries of confirmed Janeites and Jane Austen lovers.
From: Jane Austen's World on 1 Jan 2014

Friday Follow: Image of 18th C. Sisters

I’ve often wondered what Jane Austen and her sister Cassandra would have looked like as young ladies. This lovely public domain image by Paul Sandby from the Yale Center for British art gives us an idea. In her teens, Jane’s dresses would...
From: Jane Austen's World on 31 May 2013

"ELEGANCE AND DECADENCE - The Age of the Regency"

Reblogged from The Rush Journals: Below are links to a BBC documentary called "ELEGANCE AND DECADENCE - The Age of the Regency". The documentary is hosted by historian Dr. Lucy Worsley, author of the 2011 book, "If Walls Could Talk, An Intimate History...
From: Jane Austen's World on 21 Feb 2013

Walking in Austen’s Footsteps, by Paul Emanuelli

The period between 1811 and 1820 is known in British history as the Regency. In 1811 King George III was deemed unfit to rule and his son, the Prince Regent, ruled in his place. On his father’s death in 1820, the Prince was crowned King George IV. Coincidentally,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 9 Sep 2012

Maintaining the grounds of a landed British estate: Georgian gardening

Great landed estates were symbols of the owner’s wealth and status in British society. Everything was put on grand display – from the exquisite architecture of the house itself to the furniture, jewels, silver plate, servants, books, carriages,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 30 Aug 2012

The Acting Career of Mary Darby Robinson (1758–1800) by Lucy Warriner

Gentle readers, some months back Lucy Warriner expressed an interest in writing about Mary Darby Robinson. This past week she submitted this wonderful post about a fascinating and successful woman who embodied the Georgian Era – wife, mother, actress,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 12 Aug 2012

19th Century Learning Academies and Boarding Schools: An Eyewitness Account

As many Jane Austen fans know, Rev. George Austen ran a boarding school out of his parsonage house in Steventon to augment his £230 pr year income. In1793 he began to teach the sons of local gentlemen in his home to prepare them for university. His library...
From: Jane Austen's World on 1 Aug 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.