The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "18th-century engraving"

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Your search for posts with tags containing 18th-century engraving found 98 posts

Read the latest issue of ECF now on Project MUSE: Summer 2016,...

Read the latest issue of ECF now on Project MUSE: Summer 2016, 28.4, https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/33735 “Sublime Luxuries” of the Gothic Edifice: Immersive Aesthetics and Kantian Freedom in the Novels of Ann Radcliffe, pp. 713-738, by Kristin...

Last Saturday around these parts.Today it is rather cool here in...

Last Saturday around these parts. Today it is rather cool here in Hamilton, Ontario, actually. “Dreadful-Hot Weather” from 1808. Posted just for fun, from a scrapbook in the McMaster University archives. Photography by Dr. Emily West.

18th-century printers’ ornaments. The first one reminds me of...

18th-century printers’ ornaments. The first one reminds me of the “Mirror, Mirror” scene in the tale of Snow White. The second ornament held a spot for the book owner’s mark or signature, but that guy “John Hancocked”...

Printers ornaments featuring animals: cat asleep among...

Printers ornaments featuring animals: cat asleep among vegetables, owl defying the stormy seashore, monkey chained to an olive branch (these are all very weird, now that I look at them in a group). They are from Fables nouvelles, by Claude Joseph...

Putti playing with soap bubbles, a printer’s ornament in a book...

Putti playing with soap bubbles, a printer’s ornament in a book of fables. Fables nouvelles, by Claude Joseph Dorat (1734-80) (Paris: Delalain, 1773). Photographer Dr. Emily West, in the McMaster University archives. Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction...

Miss Mouser’s Cat, early 19th century. Each of...

Miss Mouser’s Cat, early 19th century. Each of these gentlemen is responding to the lady’s advertisement describing her lost cat and offering a reward for its return. She claims that none of these felines is hers. (Emily West photographer.)...

Three illustrations from Fables nouvelles, by Claude Joseph...

Three illustrations from Fables nouvelles, by Claude Joseph Dorat (1734-80) (Paris: Delalain, 1773): Fable 7, Le Tonnere et les grenouilles (C.P. Marillier and Y le Gouaz, sculpt), p. 25; Fable 18, L’Autruche (C.P. Marillier and L.J....

The Ghosts; Or, Mrs. Duffy and Mrs. Crukshanks, written by T....

The Ghosts; Or, Mrs. Duffy and Mrs. Crukshanks, written by T. Dibdin, Esq.—Sung by Mr. Fawcett, at Covent-Garden Theatre, published 25th March 1805, by Laurie and Whittle. This broadsheet includes the lyrics of the ballad sung at Covent Garden in...

“Bachelors in the Next World chang’d into Post-Horses,”...

“Bachelors in the Next World chang’d into Post-Horses,” published by William Holland, November 7, 1799. The attempted repair in the bottom right corner reminds me of that botched Ecce Homo “restoration” in Spain....

L0078325 A meeting of a Calves-Head Club for Whig gentlemen

L0078325 A meeting of a Calves-Head Club for Whig gentlemen: Quite a few political cartoons available from the Wellcome Library too. This one’s from 1734. Gotta love all that text on the bottom to spell out the meaning of the image.

L0078507 Frontispiece showing a domestic kitchen scene.

L0078507 Frontispiece showing a domestic kitchen scene.: And another historical cookery image from the Wellcome Library’s latest batch of historial illustrations uploaded to the Flickr albums. All these historical images are in the public domain....

L0078311 Engraving of designs for carved fruit.

L0078311 Engraving of designs for carved fruit.: How to carve pretty designs in fruit, from a 17th-century book. Wellcome Library new batch of historial photos, all in public domain.

L0078310 Engraving of tools used for carving food.

L0078310 Engraving of tools used for carving food.: New batch of historial images, all in the public domain, loaded onto the Wellcome Library Flickr this summer.

The first two images in this set come from A Tale of a Tub....

The first two images in this set come from A Tale of a Tub. Written for the universal improvement of mankind, to which is added an account of a battle between the ancient and modern books in St. James’s library, by Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), 11th...

And another bonus post, transferring those ECF archive images...

And another bonus post, transferring those ECF archive images from the now-shelved website archive. Pamela: Or, Virtue Rewarded. Engr. opp. p. 451, vol. 3 in Pamela, Samuel Richardson (1689-1761), 4 vols. (London, 1742). Engr. by François Gravelot...

Saving more images from our ECF web archive, while will be...

Saving more images from our ECF web archive, while will be shelved shortly. La Belle Assemblée, or, the Adventures of Twelve Days, by Mme de Gomez, trans. Eliza Haywood (1728), vol. 1, p. 72. The Lady’s Museum, by Charlotte Lennox (1729-1804)....

Saving some more images from the website changeover. These are...

Saving some more images from the website changeover. These are all in the public domain: free to use as you choose! Don Quixote. El ingenioso hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha. 4 vols., by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra (1547-1616). Ninth Edition. Madrid:...

And here is another batch of authors from the very long 18th...

And here is another batch of authors from the very long 18th century: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, Mme de Genlis, Sophie Cottin, Samuel Richardson, William Godwin, Michael de Cervantes Saavedra In random TUMBLR order. Sigh.

womencan: Hannah More (2 February 1745 – 7 September 1833) was...

womencan: Hannah More (2 February 1745 – 7 September 1833) was an English religious writer, Romantic and philanthropist. She can be said to have made three reputations in the course of her long life: as a poet and playwright in the circle of Samuel...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.