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Search Results for "18th-century literature"

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Your search for posts with tags containing 18th-century literature found 70 posts

Miscellanies, poetry, and authorship, 1680-18

Carly Watson, Miscellanies, poetry, and authorship, 1680-1800 (London, 2021). Today’s miscellanies tend to be compendia of interesting facts or curious trivia – think of Schott’s original miscellany – but three centuries ago miscellanies were...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 5 Aug 2021

Mister Spectator’s Coffeehouse Club

By Stephen Basdeo On 1 March 1711 a new periodical appeared entitled The Spectator, written and edited by Joseph Addison and Richard Steele. Addison and Steele were aristocrats who in their periodicals wished to comment upon the habits, follies,...

Poking Fun at Rebels

By Stephen Basdeo In 1715 the newly-united Kingdom of Great Britain had a new monarch: George I of Hanover. He had inherited the throne the year before because Queen Anne’s closest Protestant relation (there were about 50 other people in line to...

Joseph Ritson’s Discovery of “Robin Hood and the Monk” (1465)

By Stephen Basdeo While researching my book, Discovering Robin Hood: The Life of Joseph Ritson: Gentleman, Scholar, and Revolutionary, I came across some fascinating information. I give below a snippet from my forthcoming book: In 1795 Joseph Ritson,...

Robert Southey’s “Wedding of Robin Hood and Maid Marian”

By Stephen Basdeo Dr Mark Truesdale and I are currently transcribing Robert Southey’s ‘Harold; or, The Castle of Morford’ (Bodleian MS Eng. Misc. e. 21), which was originally written in the summer of 1791. Robin Hood and Maid Marian,...

Criminality and Animal Cruelty in 18th-Century England

I am currently in the final stages of editing a book chapter I have written for Prof. Alexander Kaufman’s and Penny Vlagopoulos’s forthcoming work entitled Food and Feasting in Post-1700 Outlaw Narratives (2018). My own contribution focuses...

Guess where these fabulous quotations come from? All from...

Guess where these fabulous quotations come from? All from 18th-century literature. Learn more about 18th-century literature by reading ECF journal: https://muse.jhu.edu/journal/324

Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal Tumblr account turned 5 years...

Eighteenth-Century Fiction journal Tumblr account turned 5 years old this week! http://ecf.humanities.mcmaster.ca/

New ECF article, autumn issue, vol. 29, no. 1: “The Pleasures of...

New ECF article, autumn issue, vol. 29, no. 1: “The Pleasures of ‘the World’: Rewriting Epistolarity in Burney, Edgeworth, and Austen,” by Rachael Scarborough King https://muse.jhu.edu/article/632054

New ECF article: ” Louis Sébastien Mercier et l’esthétique de...

New ECF article: ” Louis Sébastien Mercier et l’esthétique de la force: Passion, virilité et violence amoureuse,” par Geneviève Boucher https://muse.jhu.edu/article/632052

The Old Pretender in Scotland 1715: Jacobites.Brian Boru: Irish...

The Old Pretender in Scotland 1715: Jacobites. Brian Boru: Irish King who lived from ca. 941 - 1014. Read the ECF article “Sarah Butler’s Irish Tales, a Jacobite Romance,” by Lucy Cogan in the newest issue of the journal:...

Capt. Charles Johnson’s “General History of the Pyrates” (1724)

In 1724 a book appeared entitled A General and True History of the Robberies and Murders of the Most Notorious Pyrates (1724) which was written by a “Captain” Charles Johnson. The name of Charles Johnson is likely a pseudonym for a writer...

Samuel Richardson published Pamela in late 1740; in response to...

Samuel Richardson published Pamela in late 1740; in response to the stir this novel caused, he published a two-volume sequel in late 1741. This lovely engraving shows Pamela in the sequel, with her brood that resulted from her happy marriage to Mr B....

Poetry in the digital age: the Digital Miscellanies Index and eighteenth-century culture

For most of us, reading for pleasure usually means getting stuck into some fiction or non-fiction. Poetry is a less common diversion, but we still have an appetite for poems to dip into, to find solace in, to memorise and share. And we can choose from...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 23 Aug 2016

Read the latest issue of ECF now on Project MUSE: Summer 2016,...

Read the latest issue of ECF now on Project MUSE: Summer 2016, 28.4, https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/33735 “Sublime Luxuries” of the Gothic Edifice: Immersive Aesthetics and Kantian Freedom in the Novels of Ann Radcliffe, pp. 713-738, by Kristin...

The latest issue of ECF is now on Project MUSE: Summer 2016,...

The latest issue of ECF is now on Project MUSE: Summer 2016, 28.4, https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/33735 The Abbé Mallet’s Unsigned Contribution to the Encyclopédie, pp. 691-712, by Reginald McGinnis See above 3 illustrations of the...

Summer 2016 issue of ECF is now on Project MUSE:...

Summer 2016 issue of ECF is now on Project MUSE: 28.4, https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/33735 “Give Me the Consideration of Being the Bondsman”: Embarrassment and the Figure of the Bond in the Sentimental Fiction of Samuel Richardson, pp....

Newest issue of ECF is now on Project MUSE: Summer 2016,...

Newest issue of ECF is now on Project MUSE: Summer 2016, 28.4, https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/33735 “A Reformation so much wanted”: Clarissa’s Glorious Shame, pp. 645-666, by Ailsa Kay See above Francis Hayman’s (1708-76) painting...

Newest issue of ECF is now on Project MUSE: Summer 2016, 28.4,...

Newest issue of ECF is now on Project MUSE: Summer 2016, 28.4, https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/33735 Fear, Liberty, and Honourable Death in Montesquieu’s Persian Letters, pp. 623-644, by Megan GallagherSee above the title page from Lettres Persanes (1721)...

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