The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "19th Century"

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Your search for posts with tags containing 19th Century found 659 posts

“The Truth and Nothing But the Truth”: Its first use in popular culture

By Stephen Basdeo ‘The truth and nothing but the truth’—it’s a well-known phrase used in courts of law and most of us have probably heard it in some police procedural drama. The principle that one should not lie in a court of law...

The Noble Radical: Charles Lennox, 3rd Duke of Richmond

By Stephen Basdeo On 22 February 1735 Charles Lennox, the Duke of Richmond, and his wife, Sarah Cadogan, welcomed into the world a son, whom they named Charles, after the father. The young Charles received the upbringing that was typical to many of the...

Brewing up some history: recreating historical beer recipes

By Tiah Edmunson-Morton At the expense of sounding cliché, historic recipe recreations are a way to taste the past. Figuring out proper ingredients, considering environmental conditions, and using appropriate equipment all bring you closer to what...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Mar 2020

Anna J Agnew

Anna J. Agnew,Chicago Tribune, 9 March 1902, p. 43In the spring of 1902, newspapers around the United States reported that eighteen-year-old Anna Agnew, of Norwood Pennsylvania had been proclaimed a “champion glass blower.” Stories in New...
From: Conciatore on 11 Mar 2020

Adam Bell, Clim of the Clough and William of Cloudeslie

By Stephen Basdeo Stories of Robin Hood have been popular since at least the late fourteenth century, as we know from William Langland’s Vision of Piers Plowman (c.1377). However, around the same time that the ‘rymes of Robyn Hode’ flourished,...

Frederick Sandys’ Plants in “Medea”

These past few months I have been busy researching and writing, in order to present a paper at MLA this past January. I had many ideas that I wasn’t able to explore in my presentation due to time constraints, so I thought I’d share some some...
From: Alberti's Window on 18 Feb 2020

A Hidden History of Beard Terms!

2020 will be a milestone for me, as it sees the completion of my research, and the submission of my book Concerning Beards: Facial Hair, Health and Practice in England, 1650-1900, in many ways bringing an end to my project on the history of facial hair...
From: DrAlun on 14 Feb 2020

Waste Not, Want Not: Interpreting Thrift through Victorian Food Writing

By Lindsay Middleton When you use ‘thrift’ in conversations today, the word carries connotations of frugality and, perhaps, tightfistedness. In mid- to late-nineteenth century, however, the meaning of ‘thrift’ was being reinvigorated....
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Feb 2020

The Working Man’s Robin Hood: The Writings of Allan Cunningham (1784–1842)

By Stephen Basdeo In 1832, the publisher Charles Knight had a bright idea: every Saturday he would publish a new magazine which whose aim was to educate working-class readers about their world. It would not contain news, and would therefore be exempt...

The Life and Work of Victorian Robin Hood Scholar John Mathew Gutch (1776–1861)

By Stephen Basdeo The modern scholarly study of the Robin Hood legend began with the pioneering work of Joseph Ritson who in 1795 published Robin Hood: A Collection of all the Ancient Poems, Songs, and Ballads. Several nineteenth-century novelists, such...

Twelve Unread Books: my New Year’s resolution for completing one each month in

Happy 2020 everyone.  In the spirit of learning more about Jane Austen and the world she lived in, I am determined to finish reading the 12 books highlighted in this post. I purchased most of these books years ago and have used many for reference....
From: Jane Austen's World on 27 Dec 2019

More Information On The Half Axe.

Half-Axe Information.Basically the half axe was larger than a tomahawk but smaller than a felling axe.https://www.furtradetomahawks.com/half-axes---21.htmlcamp axe: an axe with a lighter head (2 1/4 lb.) than a regular axe and a handle that measures around...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 3 Dec 2019

18th Century Recipes for a 21st Century Thanksgiving

Every November,  scores of American families sit down to Thanksgiving dinner, a tradition followed for almost 400 years in the New World. The main dish of this celebratory feast is a turkey, stuffed and roasted to perfection. In the 18th century,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 28 Nov 2019

Bottle gourds floated to the New World from Africa

Bottle gourds floated to the New World from Africa.For thousands of years, bottle gourds have been cultivated for use the world over as drinking vessels, medicine bottles and even fishing bobs. A new study looks at how they got to the Americas from their...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 26 Nov 2019

Anna J Agnew, Champion Glassblower

Anna J. Agnew,Chicago Tribune, 9 March 1902, p. 43In the spring of 1902, newspapers around the United States reported that eighteen-year-old Anna Agnew, of Norwood Pennsylvania had been proclaimed a “champion glass blower.” Stories in New...
From: Conciatore on 13 Nov 2019

Spence's Old Powder Horn.

No date on Spences horn, but obviously it looks pretty old, & Spence's images were so good I just had to ask Spence if I could use his images. Thanks Mate, very much appreciated.Spence being Spence he just had to put this old horn back into service,...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 9 Nov 2019

Halloween Special: Shaving the Dead in Irish Folklore

Shaving the dead in Irish folklore The Irish Folklore Collection archive in University College Dublin contains a massive volume of documents, sound-recordings and other material collected under the auspices of the Irish Folklore Commission and other bodies...
From: DrAlun on 31 Oct 2019

Pierce Egan’s Sports Journalism

By Anthony Bynoe Readers of this blog will know that the Victorian novelist and journalist, Pierce Egan the Younger (1814–80), has been featured many times here by Stephen Basdeo. Today, however, Anthony Bynoe, a student-athlete at Richmond: The...

The Singular Case of the Tiverton Barber

We all know the feeling of paying for something that doesn’t match up with our expectations, or not receiving the service or product we expect for our money. Many of us wouldn’t think twice of complaining, and getting a refund. But would we...
From: DrAlun on 15 Oct 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.