The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "19th Century England"

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Your search for posts with tags containing 19th Century England found 45 posts

Twelve Unread Books: my New Year’s resolution for completing one each month in

Happy 2020 everyone.  In the spirit of learning more about Jane Austen and the world she lived in, I am determined to finish reading the 12 books highlighted in this post. I purchased most of these books years ago and have used many for reference....
From: Jane Austen's World on 27 Dec 2019

18th Century Recipes for a 21st Century Thanksgiving

Every November,  scores of American families sit down to Thanksgiving dinner, a tradition followed for almost 400 years in the New World. The main dish of this celebratory feast is a turkey, stuffed and roasted to perfection. In the 18th century,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 28 Nov 2019

Greco Roman Influences on Women’s Hairstyles During the Georgian Era

In the past, this blog published several articles on hairstyles for men and women in the Regency era. This post discusses hairstyles in Georgian times. During a recent visit to the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, I had the pleasure of examining a small,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 23 Aug 2019

A Jane Austen Christmas by Rachel Dodge

Christmas with Jane Austen Many Austen fans enjoy thinking about how Jane and her family celebrated Christmas. They wonder, did she give gifts, “deck” the halls, or have a Christmas tree? As most Austen fans know, many of the Christmas traditions...
From: Jane Austen's World on 16 Dec 2017

Heat and Light in Austen’s Novels (Part 2): Candles, by Rachel Dodge

Just as fire was the centerpiece of most evening gatherings in Jane Austen’s time, candles also played a vital role in Regency life and culture. Today, family members work or read in separate rooms in the evening and go to bed at different times...
From: Jane Austen's World on 9 Oct 2017

Ice Cream in July During the Georgian Era

Gentle Reader, This week marks the July 4th holiday in the U.S., which means family gatherings, outdoor picnics, firework celebrations, and, most of all, ice cream! This delicious treat became more and more common at the turn of the 19th century when...
From: Jane Austen's World on 3 Jul 2017

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: the book, the graphic novel, the movie

Brainless zombies overrun Regency England in search of ... brains. Can Lizzie Bennet and Mr. Darcy use their warrior skills save England from the zombie hordes? Watch the movie and see.
From: Jane Austen's World on 6 Feb 2016

Oh, What a Scandal! A Gretna Green Elopement, Marriage AND Divorce?

Another Elopement–A considerable sensation has been created in Dublin by the disappearance of the lovely daughter of Sir Thomas Butler, of county Carlow, with Captain Gosset, son of the Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant. An attachment had existed...
From: Jane Austen's World on 31 Oct 2015

Regency Fashion: Keeping Hems Clean

During the late 18th century, early 19th century, trains on gowns were de rigueur. I chose to show the two gowns below, since the styles were popular when Jane Austen was a teenager (first image) and wrote the first editions of Northanger Abbey, Sense...
From: Jane Austen's World on 12 Apr 2014

Downton Abbey Season 4, Episodes 3 – 6: Oh, the tepidness of it all

Poor Matthew died as Season 3 ended. We all sat in our seats as if dumbstruck, certain that Season 4 would begin with a resounding bang, including our attendance at his funeral and wake. Instead, viewers have been treated to a season of tepidness. Julian...
From: Jane Austen's World on 11 Feb 2014

Books to Purchase in the New Year and a Book Give Away

For winter reading in 2014, I'd like to recommend Jane Austen's England and Sense and Sensibility: The Annotated Edition as necessary additions in the libraries of confirmed Janeites and Jane Austen lovers.
From: Jane Austen's World on 1 Jan 2014

John Tallis’s Street Views of London and The London Low Life Project

In 1838, John Tallis, mapmaker, created a series of street views of central London that are breathtaking. His images showed detailed views of the streets using the facades of the buildings. These street views are much like we use Google street view today,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 2 Jul 2013

Regency Fashion: Men’s Breeches, Pantaloons, and Trousers

One of the benefits of gathering images for Pinterest is that one’s awareness of the minute differences in fashions from year to year improves. Daily exposure to thousands of fashion images from the Georgian era have taught me to notice the nuances...
From: Jane Austen's World on 21 Jun 2013

Progression of Regency Fashion in Jane Austen’s Adult Life

The blog, Carla-at-Home , features an interesting post on the progression of Regency fashion. The images were taken from John Peacock’s book: Costume 1066 – 1966, A Complete Guide to English Costume Design and History (copyrighted 1986). Mr. Peacock...
From: Jane Austen's World on 15 Jun 2013

A Drive Through Steventon to St. Nicholas Church

Steventon. Every Janeite has heard of this sleepy little village in Hampshire and the parsonage in which Jane lived over half her life. Situated in the chalk hills of North Hans, about seven miles from Basingstoke. As with Chawton, I “traveled”...
From: Jane Austen's World on 5 Jun 2013

A Drive Through Chawton Village

Tony Grant’s recent pictorial visit to Chawton was so popular that I thought you might like to see what the village surrounding the house looks like.  You might want to reference Tony’s images with these, which were taken with Google maps....
From: Jane Austen's World on 25 May 2013

Pride and Prejudice: Having a Ball at Chawton House

Pride and Prejudice: Having a Ball was filmed in Chawton House. For this BBC2 production, Regency ball was reconstructed in a way that Jane Austen's contemporaries knew well, but whose meaning in many instances has been lost to us.
From: Jane Austen's World on 17 May 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.