The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "19th century"

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Your search for posts with tags containing 19th century found 639 posts

Sewing Birds.

Sewing Birds & Sewing Clamps.The Monmouth Museum is home to one of North America's largest collections of 18th and 19th century sewing clamps also known as sewing birds. Sewing clamps were used in the 18th century to attach one end of a piece of cloth...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 15 Sep 2019

Museum of Appalachia to Host “Days of the Pioneer” Antique Exposition - September 13th & 14th

Museum of Appalachia P.O. Box 1189, Norris, TN 37828 Phone: 865-494-7680 or 494-0514 E-mail: janmarshall@museumofappalachia.org www.museumofappalachia.orgMuseum of Appalachia to Host “Days of the Pioneer” Antique Exposition - September 13th...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 10 Sep 2019

Joseph Ritson the Radical

By Stephen Basdeo Joseph Ritson was born in Stockton-on-Tees in 1752 to a poor yeoman family. As a child, he attended the local Unitarian Sunday School where his talents intellectual talents were noticed, which led him to being apprenticed to a conveyancer...

Greco Roman Influences on Women’s Hairstyles During the Georgian Era

In the past, this blog published several articles on hairstyles for men and women in the Regency era. This post discusses hairstyles in Georgian times. During a recent visit to the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, I had the pleasure of examining a small,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 23 Aug 2019

Queen Victoria’s Taste in Art

Franz Xaver Winterhalter, “Queen Victoria and Victoire, the Duchess of Nemours” (1852). Oil on canvas, 26.2″ x 20″, Royal Collection. These past few months I have been delving into the art of the Pre-Raphaelites and William Morris,...
From: Alberti's Window on 30 Jul 2019

Australian Aboriginals. The First Farmers. A New History!

Aboriginal farm near Mount Franklin. Picture Credit: Culture Victoria.https://www.foreground.com.au/environment/decolonising-agriculture-bruce-pascoes-dark-emu/; Australian Aboriginals. The First Farmers . A New Australian History.It seems that what we...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 30 Jul 2019

“The Vision” by Robin Hood (1841)

Everyone of course loves to investigate appearances of the name of Robin Hood in medieval court records. One of these days, it might finally be proven who the “real” Robin Hood was by combing through these patchy records of medieval England....

Anon. ‘Robin Hood’ (1828)

The following poem, written anonymously and titled simply as ‘Robin Hood’, appeared in The Oriental Observer and Literary Chronicle in 1828. The newspaper, printed in Calcutta during the rule of the East India Company, went through a number...

Opium; or, How it Became a “Dirty Drug”

By Stephen Basdeo We live in an era in which, increasingly, governments in many western countries are realising that they are losing the so-called “War on Drugs”. Some countries have completely decriminalised certain substances, while in some...

The Awakening Conscience

By Stephen Basdeo William Holman Hunt’s The Awakening Conscience (1853) is one of my favourite Pre-Raphaelite paintings. Holman Hunt was a religious man and this was a companion piece to another painting of Jesus Christ entitled The Light of the...

Jack Harkaway: The Victorian Harry Potter

By Stephen Basdeo The Victorians in many ways were just like us: they enjoyed a good scandal whenever it was reported in the press, they liked both trashy and high-brow entertainment, and like today, they had their popular heroes adored by both adults...

The Barber and the Abusive Parrot!

In the 18th and 19th centuries, the chattering barber was a comic stereotype. All sorts of satires and images lampooned the loquacious shaver, more intent on the sound of his own voice than the customer’s comfort. But in 1869 an unusual case...
From: DrAlun on 12 Jun 2019

Robin Hood the Angry Letter Writer

By Stephen Basdeo Many people have adopted the name of Robin Hood over the years. The most obvious ones which spring to mind are the men who appear in medieval court records, being criminals who adopted the alias. The press today even applies the name...

Anthony Trollope’s He Knew He Was Right: a scrutiny of clinical melancholia

Marcus Stone, “Trevelyan at Casalunga” Dear friends and readers, Though it’s been some time since I taught Trollope’s He Knew He Was Right, and I have published a chapter of my book (Trollope on the ‘Net) on this novel, and...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 4 Jun 2019

Andrew Davies’s Les Miserables

Lily Collins as Fantine, holding Mailow Defoy as the child Cosette (Episode 2) Dominic West as the elusive mayor (Episode 2) Andrew Davies produces video masterpieces as regularly as other people simply go out to a movie, and in the last few years or...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 26 May 2019

Uncovered: The First ever Beard and Moustache Competition?!

Last week, hordes of hirsute men descended upon Antwerp in hopes of securing a prize at the World Beard and Moustache Championships. This has become a major event, attracting thousands of entrants, and headlines all across the world. It has also...
From: DrAlun on 21 May 2019

Robin Hood of the Anti-Corn Law League

By Stephen Basdeo While physical archival research remains the “bread and butter” of the work of any historian, the rise of online repositories of primary sources have proved to be of invaluable use to many a historian over the years. This...

Anthony Trollope’s Can You Forgive Her?: Making his or her way …

Caroline Mortimer as Alice Vavasour reading the morning after her and Lady Glen’s night in the priory at Matching … (1974 BBC Pallisers) Alice brooding just before she accepts John Grey (from original illustrations to the novel by Miss E...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 12 May 2019

The Female Vagrant

By Stephen Basdeo English authorities always seems to have had a harsh attitude towards its destitute and homeless people, or vagrants. At the height of the Black Death in medieval England, when labour was becoming scarce and many people, understandably,...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.