The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "19th-century"

Your search for posts with tags containing 19th-century found 17 posts

The Chartist History of England: Henry I (1849) | Edwin Roberts

Little is known of Edwin F. Roberts (1818–64), who is the author of this long-running series, originally titled A New History of England, and serialised in Reynolds’s Political Instructor between 1849 and 1850.[1] That he was a Chartist and republican...

Cheer up! Cheer up! Ye Chartist Boys! | Anonymous

The following song was written in 1839 after the government’s rejection of the first Chartist petition, which would have seen the right to vote extended to all adult males regardless of their income. It first appeared in a short-lived newspaper called...

Reynolds Studies: A Personal History by Rohan McWilliam

Professor Rohan McWilliam gives his own account of how he was introduced to the life and work of George W M Reynolds G. W. M. Reynolds Society I can honestly claim to have been interested in George W.M. Reynolds since early adolescence, even if my path...

Review: “The 19th-Century Underworld: Crime, Controversy & Corruption” by Stephen Carver

By Stephen Basdeo Everyone nowadays seems fascinated by the Victorian criminal underworld. From Ripper Street to Peaky Blinders, it seems people cannot get enough of murdered sex workers and brutal yet gentlemanly gangsters. We all now know the tropes:...

Le ‘Voltaire de Beuchot’ à la lettre: sources d’une édition savante sous la Restauration

Œuvres de Voltaire, Beuchot (éd.), Paris, Lefèvre, t.1, 1834. BnF. Si elle n’égale celle du patriarche ni par son ampleur, ni par son lustre, ni par la célébrité de ses intervenants, la correspondance...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 3 Jul 2018

The Last Dying Speech and Confession of Jack Straw

In 1381, one of the most important events in English medieval history occurred: the Peasants’ Revolt. Under the leadership of a former soldier, Wat Tyler (d. 1381), a radical priest, John Ball (d. 1381), and Jack Straw (d. 1381), approximately 50,000...

New ECF article, autumn issue, vol. 29, no. 1: “The Pleasures of...

New ECF article, autumn issue, vol. 29, no. 1: “The Pleasures of ‘the World’: Rewriting Epistolarity in Burney, Edgeworth, and Austen,” by Rachael Scarborough King https://muse.jhu.edu/article/632054

New ECF article, fall issue: “‘He looked quite red’: Persuasion...

New ECF article, fall issue: “‘He looked quite red’: Persuasion and Austen’s New Man of Feeling,” by Taylor Walle https://muse.jhu.edu/article/632053

Like this dramatic pose very much. Don’t have the data on this...

Like this dramatic pose very much. Don’t have the data on this picture right now, but posting it anyway. Early 19th-century engraving.

notyourxfile: William Powell Frith (1819 - 1909) Pope Makes...

notyourxfile: William Powell Frith (1819 - 1909) Pope Makes Love To Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1852) oil on canvas, 1.180 x 942 mm Not painted until midway through the 19th century, but a great image of two 18th-century icons: Mary Wortley Montagu...

The Monkey’s, a satirical print published in 1804. How...

The Monkey’s, a satirical print published in 1804. How comforting to learn that the use of apostrophe-s in place of the regular plural with a simple S has been going on for such a long time. I don’t know what that dog is doing, so I’ve...

Miss Mouser’s Cat, early 19th century. Each of...

Miss Mouser’s Cat, early 19th century. Each of these gentlemen is responding to the lady’s advertisement describing her lost cat and offering a reward for its return. She claims that none of these felines is hers. (Emily West photographer.)...

A tinsmith helped people repair and extend the life of their...

A tinsmith helped people repair and extend the life of their household utensils and vessels. A much thriftier practice than our toss-and-buy-new philosophy nowadays. This engraving is from James Godby, Italian Scenery: representing the manners, customs,...

Laundromat in Italy, 1805-style. Most of these women are wearing...

Laundromat in Italy, 1805-style. Most of these women are wearing some sort of clog or sandal, perhaps to avoid slipping in this wet, stone room, or to keep their regular footwear from getting soaked on laundry day. So many costume details can be discovered...

Although this engraving identifies the game as “Bomble...

Although this engraving identifies the game as “Bomble [Bumble] Puppy,” it looks more like bocce to me. This engraving is from James Godby, Italian Scenery: representing the manners, customs, and amusements of the different states of Itlay containing...

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.