The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Adino Paddock"

Your search for posts with tags containing Adino Paddock found 12 posts

June 8

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston Weekly News-Letter (June 8, 1769). “He will take second-hand Chaises in Pay for new.” Adino Paddock offered several methods for consumers to acquire carriages...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 8 Jun 2019

“The fire was fast approaching the building”

Returning to The Saga of the Brazen Head, I’ll share some Bostonians’ experiences of the Great Fire of 20 Mar 1760, which began after dark in that brazier’s shop.At that time David Mason was a decorative painter four days short of his...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Feb 2019

“It hath been Reported in this Town Meeting”

At 9:00 A.M. on Monday, 12 Sept 1768, Bostonians (well, white men with enough property to qualify for the vote and the economic freedom to take a morning off from work) gathered at Faneuil Hall for an emergency town meeting.The event started with...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Sep 2018

Celebrating the King’s Birthday in 1768

June is so full of Sestercentennial developments that I’ve fallen behind the anniversaries already. So let’s get right to what happened in Boston 250 years ago today, on 4 June 1768.That date was King George III’s thirtieth birthday....
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Jun 2018

May

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Massachusetts Gazette (May 19, 1768).“Said Paddock will take second hand Chaises in part Pay for new.” In the late 1760s Adino Paddock operated a workshop “Where...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 22 May 2018

“Paddocks Coach was shut out of Boston”

We left Sarah Deming and her family on the morning of 21 Apr 1775 at the house of the Rev. William Gordon in Roxbury, relieved that the British army had not attacked that site as feared.Nevertheless, Deming and her female companions decided they had to...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Apr 2017

“The peopel hear gott 2 of mr Paddocks cannon one night”

Here’s another report of the removal of cannon from Charlestown and Boston in September 1774 which I came across only last week. It’s a letter from Deborah Cushing to her husband Thomas Cushing (shown here), speaker of the Massachusetts House....
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Apr 2017

Revisiting Castle William through the Commonwealth Museum

This summer the Commonwealth Museum at the Massachusetts Archives is featuring a small exhibit titled “Castle Island: A Storied History.”It features documents from the government’s collection related to the harbor island first fortified...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jun 2016

June 24

What was advertised in a colonial newspaper 250 years ago this week? Boston Post-Boy (June 23, 1766).“Said PADDOCK has always a Number of second-hand Chaises to dispose of.” Coachmaker Adino Paddock made a variety of appeals intended to incite...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 24 Jun 2016

“Unaffected Gaiety” on the Repeal of the Stamp Act

News that Parliament had repealed the Stamp Act arrived in Boston on 16 May 1766, as described yesterday. That quickly set off a public celebration.The town’s newspaper printers collaborated on a broadside announcing the news from London (readable...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 May 2016

Gore Place’s Open Carriage House, 14 June

On Sunday, 14 June, Gore Place in Waltham is inviting the public to view its newly renovated (and recently relocated) carriage house. This structure dates to 1793, thus making it even older than the brick mansion that defines the Gore Place estate.Christopher...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jun 2015

Reports of Lt. Col. James Abercrombie’s Death

The highest-ranking British officer to be killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill was Lt. Col. James Abercrombie, commander of a special battalion of grenadiers. Sometimes Salem Poor is credited with shooting Abercrombie rather than the most popular target...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jun 2014

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.