The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "African-American history"

Showing 1 - 20 of 25

Your search for posts with tags containing African-American history found 25 posts

Not so Ephemeral

I was a casual collector of ephemera for years, so I’ve always been impressed with the more serious seekers and crafters of entire collections, most prominently Eric C. Caren, founder of the Caren Archive of paper Americana. With its tagline “History...
From: streets of salem on 14 Jul 2020

The African-American History & Culture Museum: an experience that can alter the way you think about US history & culture

Tape Recorder used by Malcolm X. Wollensak Stereo-tape magnetic recorder, Model T-1515 Revolution is not a one-time event — Audre Lorde Friends and readers, People, if you’re in any doubt, go. It’s not only worth it, it is not as upsetting...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 10 Mar 2019

New Orleans at 300: A Year in Review and a Look to the Future

As 2018 comes to a close, I can’t help but reflect on this year and its meaning for a place that has become near and dear to my heart (and in-progress dissertation): New Orleans. Founded by the French in 1718, Louisiana’s largest city has...
From: The Junto on 28 Dec 2018

Black Patriotic Masculinity in the Letters of Impressed Sailor Jacob Israel Potter

Adam McNeil explores the dimensions of patriotism, citizenship, and masculinity in the letters of impressed sailor Jacob Israel Potter.
From: The Junto on 8 May 2018

Guest Post: Review of the National Museum of African-American History and Culture

Guest poster Evelyne Martial is a retired civil rights attorney. She received her JD from the Cincinnati College of Law. She is currently enrolled in the Gender and Cultural Studies Program at Simmons College. Early on a cold, frigid morning in Washington,...
From: The Junto on 15 Mar 2017

Guest Post: Racial Violence and Black Nationalist Politics

About the Guest Poster: Keisha N. Blain (@KeishaBlain) is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Iowa. She is a regular blogger for the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS). She is currently completing her first book entitled,...
From: The Junto on 18 Aug 2015

Graphic Novels Roundtable Q & A: Ari Kelman, Battle Lines: a Graphic Novel of the Civil War

We continue day three of our graphic novels roundtable with an interview with historian Ari Kelman, who co-authored Battle Lines: a Graphic History of the Civil War. Previously Jessica Parr discussed using graphic novels to explore painful...
From: The Junto on 15 Jul 2015

Teaching Trauma: Narrative and the Use of Graphic Novels in Discussing Difficult Pasts

Roy Rogers kicked off yesterday’s 4-day roundtable with a review of the graphic novel Rebel. For day two of our roundtable on graphic novels and history, I will discuss the use of graphic novels in teaching traumatic histories. As anyone who...
From: The Junto on 14 Jul 2015

This Week in Early American History

Welcome to another edition of This Week in American History. It has been a busy, yet troubling two weeks. We would like to begin by offering our condolences to the family, friends, and colleagues of Christopher Schmidt-Nowara, of Tufts University. Dr....
From: The Junto on 28 Jun 2015

The Charleston Shooting and the Potent Symbol of the Black Church in America

Last night, Dylann Storm Roof entered the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, sat through an hour-long meeting, and then opened fire on those in attendance. Reverend Clementa Pinckney, a state senator,...
From: The Junto on 18 Jun 2015

This Week in Early American History

Welcome to another addition of This Week in Early American History! This past week, there was some rumination on the ways social media is changing academic publishing. In a similar vein, we have two calls for contributors. The American Historian, which...
From: The Junto on 7 Jun 2015

On Remembrance and Resurrection: Commemorating Portsmouth’s (NH) African Burying Ground

“I am the resurrection and the life.” This passage from John 11.25 comes the Bible passage describing Lazarus’s miraculous rise from the death, as he addressed Martha, the sister of Lazarus. For Christians, this lesson is supposed to...
From: The Junto on 1 Jun 2015

Page 1 of 212Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.