The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Agnes"

Your search for posts with tags containing Agnes found 20 posts

Colouring metals in the Far East

By Agnese Benzonelli How far can someone go in the name of research? In my case quite a long way. For a month, I loosely taped tiny plates of metal to my hands and woke up every morning with green stains on them. I was investigating craft recipes employed...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Oct 2020

On behalf of quiet and the calm beauty of realism

Roger Fry — typical painting Dear friends and readers, A brief note on behalf of two qualities I find draws me into books — and movies too, though this inward source is less obvious. A still center of quiet, of thoughtfulness out of which...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 25 Nov 2017

May 1

What was advertised in a colonial newspaper 250 years ago this week? Virginia Gazette (May 9, 1766).“AGNES … is a fair straight made lusty Mulatto, and has small breasts.” When the Virginia Gazette made its debut in the Adverts 250...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 May 2016

Women of the 1916 Dublin Rising

On 14th February 2016, I gave a short overview of the Easter Rising and the role of women in it at a community event in Melbourne - Brigidfest. Brigidfest is an annual celebration of Irish and Irish Australian women and has had some great talks over the...
From: Dr Dianne Hall on 15 Feb 2016

The Heartfelt Grief of Baillie McKeand over the Wigtown Martyrs in 1704.

John M’Keand, or McKean, sat on the assize that condemned Margaret McLachlan and Margaret Wilson to drowning in 1685.What does his grief mean for the Wigtown case? He appears on the Wigtown parish list in late 1684 as ‘Baillie McKeand’....
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 20 Jun 2015

St. Agnes' Eve Tonight--Keats and Tennyson

From John Keats' narrative poem:St. Agnes' Eve—Ah, bitter chill it was! The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold; The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass, And silent was the flock in woolly fold: Numb were the...

A Bite of Joel Christian Gill’s Strange Fruit

As I mentioned back here, I scripted one of the stories in the new anthology Colonial Comics: New England, 1620-1750. I wrote that script with the artist Joel Christian Gill in mind, and was lucky enough that he agreed to work on the project.Joel is a...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Oct 2014

4 June 1536: Jane Seymour Proclaimed Queen

On this day in history, 4 June 1536, Jane Seymour, third consort of Henry VIII of England, was proclaimed Queen of England at Greenwich Palace. The herald and chronicler Charles Wriothesley reported that: 'the 4th daie of June, being Whitsoundaie,...
From: Conor Byrne on 4 Jun 2014

The Execution of Lady Jane Grey, Queen of England

On this day, February 12 1554, Lady Jane Grey, famously the Nine - or more accurately, Thirteen - Day Queen was beheaded privately on Tower Green, shortly after her teenage husband Guildford Dudley had been executed on Tower Hill. Last week I detailed...
From: Conor Byrne on 12 Feb 2013

The Eve of St. Agnes

From John Keats' narrative poem:St. Agnes' Eve—Ah, bitter chill it was! The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold; The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass, And silent was the flock in woolly fold: Numb were the Beadsman's fingers, while he...

Covenanters Captured at David Houston’s Preaching at the Polbaith Burn in 1687

At nine o’clock at night on Sunday 16 January, 1687, a new seditious field preacher, David Houston, held a conventicle at the Polbaith Burn in Kilmarnock parish, Ayrshire. In the aftermath the field preaching, thirty-eight people were identified as...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 7 Sep 2012

The Three Women of the Lesmahagow Prayer Society Banished to Barbados in 1687

In late 1685, three women who were suspected of harbouring fugitive preachers were captured. Isobel Cassils, Agnes Keir and Isobel Steel were probably involved in supporting James Renwick and other leading Society people who frequently hid in Lesmahagow...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 5 Sep 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.