The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Alchemy"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Alchemy found 353 posts

A Roman Vegetarian Substitute for Fish Sauce

By Edith Evans Roman cookery has been one of my research interests since the 1980s; I’ve accumulated a large repertoire of ancient recipes and usually do at least one live demonstration a year.  Most of the recipes include garum or liquamen – fish...
From: The Recipes Project on 20 May 2021

George Parker, Double Ephemeris (1700)

Paul Salzman In 2015 The State Library of Victoria acquired a spectacular collection of early modern books and manuscripts, bequeathed by the physicist and barrister John Emmerson.[1] The collection has a focus on the Civil War but ranges well beyond...

Tracking the alchemical gospel through Medieval and Early Modern England

This is going to be yet another of those book reviews where I start by explaining how much the history of science has changed since I first became engaged in it, in my youth. Back in the not so good old days, the so-called occult sciences we not really...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 31 Mar 2021

A flawed survey of science and the occult in the Early Modern Period

There is no shortage of good literature on the relationships between science and magic, or science and astrology, or science and alchemy during the Early Modern Period so what is new in Mark A. Waddell’s Magic, Science, and Religion in Early Modern...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 3 Mar 2021

Alchemist Cardinal

 Portrait of Francesco Maria del MonteOttavio Leoni (1578–1630)In the early seventeenth century, Cardinal Francesco Maria del Monte served as the unofficial Florentine cultural ambassador in Rome. He regularly entertained visiting dignitaries...
From: Conciatore on 3 Feb 2021

Neri and the Kabbalah

  Kabbalistic Sephiroth Tree,from Portae Lucis, Paulus Ricius (Trans.)Augsburg, 1516.Kabbalah is a form of mysticism practiced within the Jewish tradition. In the early seventeenth century, there was a great deal of interest in Kabbalistic...
From: Conciatore on 27 Jan 2021

Don Antonio de' Medici

 Don Antonio de' MediciFrontispiece from Pierfilippo Covoni 1892In 1612, Priest Antonio Neri published his book of glassmaking recipes. L'Arte Vetraria went on to become a primary reference for glass artisans throughout Europe. He dedicated...
From: Conciatore on 22 Jan 2021

Art and Science

 Jacopo Ligozzi,1518,  fanciful glass vessels,ink and watercolor on paper.Antonio Neri's writing on glassmaking and alchemy was distinguished from that of many contemporary authors in that his work was all deeply rooted in hands-on experience. He...
From: Conciatore on 4 Jan 2021

Gold Ruby Glass

 A gold florin.Legend claims gold ruby glass was discovered when a nobel threwa gold coin into a glass maker's crucible.Antonio Neri is best remembered for writing L'Arte Vetraria. It was the first printed book entirely devoted to the formulation...
From: Conciatore on 23 Dec 2020

The Fire and the Furnace: Making Recipes Work

By Thijs Hagendijk While working on the Ars Vitraria Experimentalis (1678), the principle book on seventeenth-century glass, I came a across a peculiar remark. The author of the book, the German alchemist and glassmaker Johann Kunckel (1630-1703) composed...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Dec 2020

Witches Brew of Glass

 Glass pumpkin evocative of chalcedony glassCourtesy of  Smithsonian Museum store.In honor of Halloween, we will take a detailed look at chalcedony glass; this is one of, if not the most colorful types of glass ever made. In the seventeenth...
From: Conciatore on 30 Oct 2020

The Magic of Socotran Aloe

By Shireen Hamza “The people of this island are without faith — and they are strong magicians. They originate from Greece.” What? I had been flipping through Ikhtiyārāt-i Badī‘ī, a Persian pharmaceutical manuscript...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Oct 2020

Crocus Martis

The many different alchemical symbols used to denote crocus martis.In order to understand the seventeenth century glass recipes of Antonio Neri and for that matter, any alchemical recipes, it is first necessary to have a grasp of the chemical...
From: Conciatore on 14 Oct 2020

Vitriol of Venus

 Crystals of Copper Sulfate Pentahydrate(Vitriol of Venus)Vitriol of Venus was one of the most cherished items in Antonio Neri’s chemical library. In his book, L'Arte Vetraria, he describes its effect in glass this way:To your great contentment,...
From: Conciatore on 12 Oct 2020

Caterine Sforza

 Caterina Sforza, by Lorenzo di Credi(now in the Museum of Forlì.)We remember Antonio Neri mostly for his book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria. However, he thought about himself a bit differently; he considered himself...
From: Conciatore on 7 Oct 2020

Alchemy School

 Frontispiece woodcut from De Chemia Senioris, by Zadith ben Hamuel, 1566A common notion holds that alchemists were eccentrics, lone practitioners working in dingy basements, cut off from the rest of the world. This was a myth already well established...
From: Conciatore on 2 Oct 2020

An Alchemist's Kitchen

 Tesoro del Mondo, "Ars Preparatio Animalium"Antonio Neri 1598-1600, f. 10r (MS Ferguson 67).Between 1598 and 1600, Antonio Neri wrote a manuscript filled with alchemical recipes. He entitled it Tesoro del Mondo or "Treasure of the World"...
From: Conciatore on 28 Sep 2020

Powerful Bundles: The Materiality of Protection Amulets in Early Modern Switzerland

By Eveline Szarka If you shop around for a protection amulet today, you will most likely stumble upon ornamental jewellery. More often than not these pieces are round in shape, and pieces featuring Kabbalistic or runic symbols are especially popular....
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Sep 2020

Neri and the Kabbalah

 Kabbalistic Sephiroth Tree,from Portae Lucis, Paulus Ricius (Trans.)Augsburg, 1516.Kabbalah is a form of mysticism practiced within the Jewish tradition. In the early seventeenth century, there was a great deal of interest in Kabbalistic teachings...
From: Conciatore on 9 Sep 2020

Microscopes & Submarines

The development of #histSTM in the early decades of the Dutch Republic, or Republic of the Seven United Netherlands, to give it its correct name, was quite extraordinary. Alongside the development of cartography and globe making, the most advanced in...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 2 Sep 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.