The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Alfred"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Alfred found 35 posts

Astrology & Earthquakes

Since at least Aristotle scholars have sought to discover the connections between earthquakes and planetary motions. Aristotle noted in Book 2 of his Meteorology that there seemed to be coincidental link between eclipses and earthquakes. His coincidental...
From: Darin Hayton on 10 Nov 2021

New Book: Ruiz Fernández, “England & Spain in the Early Modern Era”

Óscar Alfredo Ruiz Fernández, England and Spain in the Early Modern Era: Royal Love, Diplomacy, Trade and Naval Relations 1604-25 (Bloomsbury, 2019).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 26 Aug 2021

France (1838) | G. W. M. Reynolds

George W. M. Reynolds spent his teenage years and early twenties in France working for the Libraire des Etrangers, a bookseller and publisher. While in France he made the acquaintance of several of the country’s famous authors and poets such as Eugene...

New Book: “Fruits of Early Globalization: Iberian Perspective”

The Fruits of the Early Globalization: An Iberian Perspective, Rafael Dobado-González and Alfredo García-Hiernaux, eds (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021). Pim de Zwart, “The Significance of Early Globalization: Arguments and Evidence.” Herbert S....
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 25 Jun 2021

The Revolutionary War Origin of the Whistleblower Law

The so called “whistleblower law” had a salty source. It did not emanate from the shrill sound of a boatswain’s pipe, but rather a... The post The Revolutionary War Origin of the Whistleblower Law appeared first on Journal of the American...

New Book: Alvar Esquerra, Felipe IV El Grande

Alfredo Alvar Esquerra, Felipe IV El Grande (Madrid, 2018).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 6 Jun 2018

New Book: Chamorro Esteban, “Barcelona y el Rey”

Alfredo Chamarro Esteban, Barcelona y el Rey: Las visitas reales de Fernando el Católico a Felipe V (Ediciones de la Tempestad, 2017).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 15 Dec 2017

The Death of Princes Alfred & Octavius and Queen Charlotte’s mysterious pregnancies

Our present Queen was not the only one to have an ‘Annus horribilis’, for King George III and Queen Charlotte theirs, however, lasted somewhat longer than one year. For them, the years between 1781-1783 could, without a doubt be described...
From: All Things Georgian on 19 Sep 2017

Shakespearean replicas then and now

A few weeks ago at a local book fair I bought a collection of engravings of Shakespeare’s Birthplace all dating from the nineteenth century. Shakespeare’s Birthplace was a major tourist attraction, and one which changed in appearance several...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 24 Mar 2017

Reviews in the Winter 2016 SCJ

Sixteenth Century Journal 47/4 (2016): R. Po-Chia Hsia reviews Carlos M.N. Eire, Reformations: The Early Modern World, 1450-1650 (Yale, 2016). Linda K. Williams reviews Nancy E. van Deusen, Global Indios: The Indigenous Struggle for Justice in Sixteenth-Century...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 10 Mar 2017

A Fast Calendar

A Seasons clock showing an astronomical year. Courtesy  of  worth1000.com Yesterday was the fourth of October. Imagine waking up this morning to discover that it is not the fifth but the fifteenth of the month; ten days have gone missing. This...
From: Conciatore on 5 Oct 2016

New Translation: López Austin, “Myth of Quetzelcoatl”

Alfredo López Austin, The Myth of Quetzelcoatl: Religion, Rulership, and History in the Nahua World, trans. Russ Davidson with Guilhem Olivier (University of Colorado Press, 2015; orig. 1973).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 27 May 2016

Article & Reviews in JJS 3/2 (2016)

Journal of Jesuit Studies 3/2 (2016): Antonio Ruiz de Montoya, Apostle of the Guaraní Author: Barbara Ganson pp.: 197–210 (14) Catholic Orientalism. Portuguese Empire, Indian Knowledge (16th–18th Centuries), written...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 12 Apr 2016

First Monday Library Chat: The Brotherton Library at the University of Leeds

Welcome to the March 2016 edition of the First Monday Library Chat. This month we have the great pleasure of traveling to Leeds and talking to Karen Sayers, Assistant Archivist at the University of Leeds. The Cookery Collection is one of the key collections...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Mar 2016

A Fast Calendar

A Seasons clock showing an astronomical year.Courtesy  of  worth1000.com Yesterday was the fourth of October. Imagine waking up this morning to discover that it is not the fifth but the fifteenth of the month; ten days have gone missing. This...
From: Conciatore on 5 Oct 2015

St. Agnes' Eve Tonight--Keats and Tennyson

From John Keats' narrative poem:St. Agnes' Eve—Ah, bitter chill it was! The owl, for all his feathers, was a-cold; The hare limp'd trembling through the frozen grass, And silent was the flock in woolly fold: Numb were the...

A. R. Wallace and “preter-human intelligences”

In “Wallace’s Woeful Wager” Dana Hunter tells the story of A. R. Wallace’s bet with John Hampden about the shape of the earth. In her version, Wallace—“venerable 19th century man of science”—was duped by scheming, doltish, young-earth...
From: Darin Hayton on 14 Jan 2015

J. Franklin Jameson Superstar

Michael D. Hattem closes our weeklong roundtable on the legacy of Al Young by looking at his historiographical essay, "American Historians Confront 'The Transforming Hand of the Revolution.'"
From: The Junto on 7 Nov 2014

The Masquerade

Roy Rogers revisits "Masquerade: The Life and Times of Deborah Sampson" for our weeklong roundtable on the legacy of Alfred F. Young.
From: The Junto on 6 Nov 2014

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.