The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "America"

Showing 1 - 20 of 1996

Your search for posts with tags containing America found 1996 posts

This Week on Dispatches: John Rees on African American Soldiers in the American Revolution

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews author and JAR contributor John Rees on the enlightening history of African American soldiers in the American... The post This Week on Dispatches: John Rees on African American Soldiers...

February 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “List of Commissioners and other Officers of the Revenue, WITH THEIR SALARIES!” In the third week of February 1770, many printers continued to advertise almanacs, hoping...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Feb 2020

Miskitu Moravians in Mesoamerica: Indigeneity, Faith, and Revolution in the 1980s

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Emily Snyder Somewhere in Nicaragua, there are forty lost...
From: Age of Revolutions on 17 Feb 2020

February 14

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Messrs. JOHN SKETCHLEY, & Co.” Robert Wells, the printer of the South-Carolina and American General Gazette, apparently experienced a disruption in his paper supply...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Feb 2020

Maj. Gen. John Sullivan and the Occupation of Easton, Pennsylvania, May 7–June 18, 1779

For a brief seven weeks, the Pennsylvania frontier village of Easton became the second largest community within the state. With an estimated 25,000 inhabitants,... The post Maj. Gen. John Sullivan and the Occupation of Easton, Pennsylvania, May 7–June...

The Age of Revolutions and the Impeachment of President Trump: A Post-Mortem

By Malick W. Ghachem The impeachment process just concluded in Washington made remarkable use of the eighteenth century as a source of political and legal authority. Progressive law professors confidently proclaimed an emphatically originalist approach...
From: Age of Revolutions on 13 Feb 2020

The Redcoat in America: The Diaries of Lieutenant William Bamford, 1757–1765 and 1776

A Redcoat in America: The Diaries of Lieutenant William Bamford, 1757-1765 and 1776 edited by John B. Hattendorf (Helion & Company, 2019) Writings of... The post The Redcoat in America: The Diaries of Lieutenant William Bamford, 1757–1765 and...

Anáhuac & Rome: Converging Indigeneity and Religiosity in Mexico’s Republican Moment

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Arturo Chang After having read Fray Servando Teresa de...
From: Age of Revolutions on 10 Feb 2020

February 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “He continues to follow the Business of an INSURANCE-BROKER.” Like many colonists who placed newspaper advertisements, John Benfield did not confine his notice in the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Feb 2020

Stirring the Revolutionary Teapot

.1765 Joshia Wedgwood Success to Trade in America and No Stamp Act1765 No Stamp Act and American Liberty Restored.
From: 18th-century American Women on 7 Feb 2020

America’s First Ally: France in the Revolutionary War

Norman Desmarais, professor emeritus at Providence College, is one of America’s most important scholars of French involvement in the American Revolution. Desmarais has long... The post America’s First Ally: France in the Revolutionary War...

African Americans and the Problems of Faith in the Age of Revolutions

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By James Sidbury The play on words embedded in the title...
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 Feb 2020

January 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “For SPAIN, PORTUGAL, LONDON … The SHIP MARY.” Deciphering the copy in these advertisements may be difficult or even impossible, but the visual images remain...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Jan 2020

19 Journal of the American Revolution Book of the Year Award Announced

The Journal of the American Revolution is pleased to announce Quarters: The Accommodation of the British Army and the Coming of the American Revolution by... The post 2019 Journal of the American Revolution Book of the Year Award Announced appeared...

Happy Birthday, Isaiah Thomas!

Isaiah Thomas, patriot printer and founder of the American Antiquarian Society, was born on January 30 (January 19 Old Style) in 1749.  It’s quite an historical coincidence that the three most significant printers in eighteenth-century America...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 30 Jan 2020

Happy Birthday, Mathew Carey!

Though Benjamin Franklin is often considered the patron saint of American advertising in the popular press, I believe that his efforts pale in comparison to the contributions made by Mathew Carey (1760-1839) in the final decades of the eighteenth...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Jan 2020

The 1619 Project and the Work of the Historian

Joseph M. Adelman explores how the craft of historical research can help us understand the interpretive debates about the 1619 Project and the American Revolution.
From: The Junto on 23 Jan 2020

Female Slaves & Rice Cultivation in Georgetown County, South Carolina

Female Slaves and Rice Cultivation in Georgetown County, South CarolinaThe intricate steps involved in planting, cultivating, harvesting, and preparing rice required an immense labor force. Planters stated that African slaves were particularly suited...
From: 18th-century American Women on 22 Jan 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.