The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Amsterdam"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Amsterdam found 21 posts

The Night Watch Restoration 2019

Commisioned in 1639 and first displayed in the Kloveniersdoelen (Musketeers’ Meeting Hall) in Amsterdam in 1642, The Night Watch by Rembrandt van Rijn is perhaps the most famous painting of the Dutch Golden Age. In July 2019 […]
From: Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Centraal on 16 Oct 2018

“it is as quiet as Charleston”

On January 26, 1797, the Pinckneys were ordered to leave France; they moved to Amsterdam to await further instructions from home. MARY STEAD PINCKNEY, in a letter to her niece Mary, reflects on the change of abode. Amsterdam March 16th 1797. . . . I should...
From: In the Words of Women on 21 Jun 2018

What I did this summer

Summer has officially been and gone, and almost as if on cue the leaves here in Stratford have started to redden and fall. A new cohort of students has arrived, and just three days into the term it feels as if they’ve always been here. The only...
From: Digital Shakespeares on 27 Sep 2017

Amsterdam Good Time, Part 1

And so it continued. Not content with fireworks, rowing contests, schoolchildren’s chain-making competitions, and exhibitions galore, it was finally time for the historians to have their four-penn’orth about the 350th anniversary of the Battle...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 28 Jun 2017

Monologues not by Shakespeare

Monologues not by Shakespeare. Tr. Marlous Lange Peters. Amsterdam: Uitgeverij International Theatre and Film Books, with Het Vijfde Bedrijf, 2016.Review by Paul Franssen (Utrecht University) As the title suggests, this book contains a collection of...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 6 Jun 2017

Public Thesis Defence on 20 June: ‘Spiritual Alchemy from the Age of Jacob Boehme to Mary Anne Atwood, 1600-1900’

After a long journey, my PhD dissertation is finally finished, approved, and printed, albeit only in a very small, privately published run. The only thing that now stands between me and my doctorate is the public defence on Tuesday, 20 June 2017,...
From: Praeludia Microcosmica on 25 May 2017

Second view: Roman Tragedies (Toneelgroep Amsterdam) @ The Barbican

I last saw Roman Tragedies eight years ago, when I was a teeny and energetic PhD student for whom theatrical marathons were par for the course. The production was, at the time, one of the biggest influences on my understanding of theatre; it remains on...
From: The Bardathon on 20 Mar 2017

My Studio at the Rijksmuseum

Whenever I have a moment to spare, I go to the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam and get to work. I roam the halls of the museum alone (yes, after hours!), and whenever I see a painting […]
From: Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Centraal on 3 Jan 2017

Free Trade and the Golden Age

The Golden Age, spectacular as it was, was based largely on the success of Dutch trade in the ‘Spice Islands’. However romantic that may sound, the spice trade actually tarnishes the Golden Age deeply. In the […]
From: Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Centraal on 31 Dec 2016

Kings of War (Toneelgroep Amsterdam) @ The Barbican Theatre

In 2009 I was lucky enough to see Toneelgroep Amsterdam perform Ivo van Hove’s Roman Tragedies at the Barbican. That mammoth reworking of Coriolanus, Julius Caesar and Antony and Cleopatra remains one of my lifetime theatrical highlights –...
From: The Bardathon on 1 May 2016

Photographer Paulette Tavormina: Seizing Beauty

Today Paulette Tavormina and the Monacelli Press have released her new book, Seizing Beauty. Taking inspiration from the Golden Age still-life masters, Tavormina lists her influences as being the artists Giovanna Garzoni, Francesco de Zurbarán,...
From: Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Centraal on 26 Apr 2016

The Wadden Sea Wardrobe

The island of Texel, off the north coast of the province of North Holland, The Netherlands, is the first island forming the Texelreede (Texel Roads) which for centuries formed a sheltered haven for ships leaving the many ports in the Zuider Zee. It was...
From: Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Centraal on 21 Apr 2016

His most potent art: the library of John Dee

Portrait of John Dee, at the Ashmolean Museum Oxford A new exhibition has just opened in London that explains more about one of the most intriguing people in Elizabethan London, John Dee. The Royal College of Physicians in Regents Park is hosting Scholar,...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 25 Jan 2016

The recipes of an eighteenth-century Amsterdam alchemist(?)

By Marieke Hendriksen Over the past two decades, it has become increasingly clear that alchemy, chemistry and medicine were still deeply intertwined in the early eighteenth century. Mostly rhetoric attempts by scholars to establish chemistry as a respectable,...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Feb 2015

Call for Papers: Geographies of Alchemy and Chemistry (5th SHAC Postgraduate Workshop)

As the international student representative of the Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry and lead organizer of this year’s postgraduate workshop, I would like to draw my readers’ attention to the following call for papers. It would...
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 5 May 2014

A Sound Dutch Beating for Fraudulent German Alchemy

Writing for the Amsterdam stage, David Lingelbach (b. 1641)—himself the son of a German expatriate and artist—published a play entitled The Converted Alchemist, or: The Betrayed Fraud in 1680. It is but one out of eleven plays he wrote under the...
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 31 Mar 2014

Rev. Henry Putman

The Rev. Henry Putman (1725—1797) is an astonishingly obscure person, especially for someone who was minister of the Dutch Reformed Church at Austin Friars for 48 years and a Fellow of the Royal Society for thirty. He doesn’t rate a mention in...
From: Kirby and his world on 23 Mar 2014

Bibliography prize, and a newly-discovered early edition of Voltaire’s works

With so many good reasons for visiting Amsterdam, the idea of going there to read 70 or so bibliographies in two days might not seem the most compelling. None the less, I and five other people interested in book history did exactly that in October, as...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 7 Nov 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.