The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Anatomy"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Anatomy found 48 posts

The Dance of Death and the first printed skeleton

The earliest printed image of a human skeleton is this cartoonish image from a German block book from the 1450s. [i] It is one of a series of skeletons in the popular genre known as the danse macabre or dance of death. Art historian extraordinaire...
From: Anita Guerrini on 19 May 2020

The Turducken of Maastricht

When I gave a talk on fossils last year at the Boerhaave Museum in Leiden, my Dutch friends told me to be sure to include a mention of the Maastricht mosasaur, the most famous fossil in the Netherlands, even though I was actually talking about much more...
From: Anita Guerrini on 20 Mar 2020

The Head of a Roman

For the past few weeks, many news outlets have reported that the skull of Pliny the Elder (Gaius Plinius Secundus, ca. 23-79 CE), the Roman naturalist and statesman who died at Pompeii, has been identified.  The latest story, in the New York Times,...
From: Anita Guerrini on 24 Feb 2020

The Teeth of Theutobochus

In January 1613, workers at an estate in the Dauphiné, in southeastern France, unearthed a number of large bones.  They included two mandibles with some teeth, a couple of vertebrae, what seemed to be a sternum, a shoulder blade, the heel...
From: Anita Guerrini on 4 Oct 2019

An Anatomy Cabinet

Utrecht, Netherlands, July 2019 Among the many delights for a historian of medicine like me at the University Museum in Utrecht is a reconstructed anatomy cabinet from the late eighteenth century.  It contains objects from the collection of Jan Bleuland...
From: Anita Guerrini on 3 Jul 2019

[Studies of heads]

Artist: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, artist. Title: [Studies of heads] [art original] / Js. Gillray. Production: [England], [ca. 1795] Catalog Record  Drawings G41 no. 7 Box D120 Acquired June 2018
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 8 Apr 2019

The Possibility of Giants

Various large bones, discovered across Europe from around 1500 onward, raised the possibility among Renaissance naturalists and intellectuals that very large humans – some five or even ten meters tall – once existed in the past.  The...
From: Anita Guerrini on 16 Mar 2019

Bitesized Blog Post #1 Automata & ‘The Turk!’

The eighteenth century was one of technological innovations. Popular interest in science, new inventions and technologies, had never been so strong, and saw the rising popularity of public science lectures, which often included demonstrations and live...
From: DrAlun on 13 Mar 2019

Gender in Early Modern Anatomical Images

In 1719, the cousins of the Italian-trained wax modeller Guillaume Desnoües brought some of his anatomical waxworks to London. These were shown with the claim that they could be seen ‘without exciting the feeling of horror men usually have...
From: We-hang-out-a-lot-in-cemeteries on 13 Dec 2018

The Skeleton Trade

Although the human skeleton was well known as a symbol of mortality before 1500, the articulated skeleton does not seem to have come into its own as an object –scientific and artistic as well as symbolic – until the time of Vesalius. ...
From: Anita Guerrini on 17 Nov 2018

A Dwarf and his Skeleton

Last month I spent some time in Special Collections at the University of Glasgow Library, looking at the catalogues of the anatomical preparations of London anatomist and man-midwife William Hunter (1718-1783).  Hunter, a Scot, left his collections...
From: Anita Guerrini on 20 Aug 2018

The devil is in the details: turpentine varnish

By Marieke Hendriksen One of the first things you learn when you do reconstruction research is that the tiniest detail can make a difference. Recently, I wanted to prepare an injection wax for corrosion preparations according to a 1790 recipe. Corrosion...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Jun 2018

Exhibition and Lecture: Ceaseless motion: William Harvey's experiments in circulation

Royal College of Physicians, 11 St Andrews Place, Regent's Park, London NW1 4LE19 January 2018 to 26 July 2018Library, Archive and MuseumTelephone: +44 (0)20 3075 1543Email: history@rcplondon.ac.ukOpening January 2018, a new exhibition...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 11 Jan 2018

Romanticism in the Dissecting Room

For centuries the need for the surgeon to learn more of the anatomy of the human body and to practice his art has required students of medicine to examine and dissect the bodies of the dead – obtained legally or otherwise – in private schools...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 29 Nov 2017

Venus’s Palaces

She’s got it,Yeah baby, she’s got it—Shocking Blue For 1570s and 1580s theatregoers, love was all around. One of the defining characteristics of the earliest surviving commercial plays is the predominance of the character Venus or her...
From: Before Shakespeare on 4 Oct 2017

The Gruesome History of Making Human Skeletons

The fabulous online journal Atlas Obscura just published an article on some of my skeleton research.  This is based on the talk, “The Whiteness of Bones,” that I gave a Columbia a couple of weeks ago.  Thanks to Sarah Laskow. ...
From: Anita Guerrini on 3 Oct 2017

Vesalius in Wonderland

Last month, artist Lisa Temple-Cox had a residency at Oregon State for two weeks as part of the Horning Series on “The Material Body” that I organized this academic year. Among the numerous talks and demonstrations she gave was this collaborative...
From: Anita Guerrini on 31 May 2017

The Wandering Womb: Female Hysteria through the Ages

The word “hysteria” conjures up an array of images, none of which probably include a nomadic uterus wandering aimlessly around the female body. Yet that is precisely what medical practitioners in the past believed was the cause behind this...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 28 Apr 2017

Spare Ribs

During my PhD I had trouble with my arms. After speaking to a fantastically enthusiastic surgeon it was revealed that I have cervical ribs. An extra set of ribs growing out of my cervical spine (you can see my x-ray
From: Early Modern Medicine on 1 Feb 2017

What’s in a name: Plaster of Paris

By Marieke Hendriksen One of the problems we face as historians studying and reconstructing recipes is that the names describing ingredients, tools, and materials change over time, and that the meaning of terms itself changes over time. This is even the...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Jan 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.