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Your search for posts with tags containing Animals found 306 posts

Van Horn on “The Power of Objects,” Plus a Panel on “Caribbean Connections”

Tonight, on Monday, 30 November, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host an online talk by Jennifer Van Horn on “The Power of Objects in 18th-Century British America.” The event description says: Over the course of the eighteenth century,...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Nov 2020

Canine Cures or Our Best Friend…

By Marc Bruck To paraphrase the old adage: dogs are humanity’s best friend. Loving, loyal and protective, they are often considered members of the family. They are symbols of wealth and power, love and affection. Recent accounts in the popular press,...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Nov 2020

Snails in medicine – past and present

By Claire Burridge  A treatment for teary eyes (Ad lacrimas oculorum): Grind together frankincense, mastic, and snails with their shells. Apply to the forehead in laurel leaves in two parts. It is tried and tested. (Tus et mastice et cocleas cum...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Sep 2020

“I have removed H——n out of the house”

As I quoted yesterday, in July 1775 John Adams sent his wife Abigail confirmation in writing that their tenant hand, an “old Man” named Hayden, should move out of the rooms he occupied in one of their Braintree houses. Hayden had refused Abigail’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Jul 2020

Revisiting Laurence Totelin’s Fevers and the Dog Star in Antiquity

Well, the Dog Days of summer are upon us once again…To help us cope with the heat, we revisit Laurence Totelin’s wonderful post from 2018.  In “Fevers and the Dog Star in Antiquity”, Laurence tells us about the origins of...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Jul 2020

An Effigy on Horseback in Marlborough

When we left merchant Henry Barnes sometimes in June 1770, his Marlborough neighbors had just hanged him in effigy.A letter from Marlborough dated 20 July and published in Edes and Gill’s Boston Gazette for 30 July gave some Whiggish townspeople’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jul 2020

Revisiting Chelsea Clark’s The Wonders of Unicorn Horns: Preventions and Cures for Poisoning

Editor’s note: Today, we revisit a wonderful post from Chelsea Clark in 2012 on the intersection of magic and medicine from Early Modern England. Drawing on the seventeenth century  manuscript ascribed to the herbalist Johanna St. John, Clark...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Jun 2020

Another Recovered Source on Bunker Hill

In late 1825 the historian Samuel Swett sent the Boston Daily Advertiser two accounts of the Battle of Bunker Hill sworn to before a Newburyport magistrate in 1818. I shared one yesterday.The other was undoubtedly published in the Boston Daily Advertiser...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jun 2020

“On Election Day a Sermon will be preached”

Election Day was a holiday in colonial Massachusetts. Not the day that people voted for their General Court representatives—that happened in town meetings, and each town could choose its own date.Rather, Election Day was when the new legislature...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 May 2020

The Influenza Epidemic of 176

Yesterday I quoted Dr. Ernest Caulfield on the dysentery epidemic of late 1775. Caulfield wrote a few years later on influenza epidemics in colonial New England. Not only did the British subjects of that time not understand the disease, they didn’t...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 May 2020

Revisiting Erik Heinrichs’ The Live Chicken Treatment for Buboes: Trying a Plague Cure in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Today we revisit a post originally published in 2017 by Erik Heinrichs on a seemingly odd treatment for plague buboes: the feathers from a chicken’s backside. Erik notes that there is a very long history of using chickens and chicken broths in medicine,...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 May 2020

The Ownership of Swans in English History: Does the Queen Own all the Swans?

Guest post by Katy Barnett, 18 May 2020. This blog has recently featured a fascinating post on whether it is possible to steal a peacock. In this post, I’m going to look at the laws surrounding a different kind of bird: the strange historical English...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 18 May 2020

Can You Steal a Peacock? Animals in Early Modern Law

Posted by Krista J. Kesselring, 22 April 2020. Can you steal a peacock? Jurists once debated this question and, for a time at least, said ‘no’. As animals meant for pleasure rather than for profit, peacocks were not ‘larcenable’....
From: Legal History Miscellany on 22 Apr 2020

Legends of Paul Revere’s Departure from Boston

After the publication of “Paul Revere’s Ride” by Henry W. Longfellow in 1860, there was a lot more attention on the silversmith and his activity on 18-19 Apr 1775.Little stories that Paul Revere’s descendants had told within the...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Apr 2020

William, the ‘Wicked Lord’ Byron – actress abducter & cowardly killer?

Dearest readers, A new video is UP! See below for a quick intro to the angry, dissipated career of William, 5th Lord Byron – known to history as ‘the Wicked Lord’ or ‘Devil Byron’/ Features actress abduction, a wolf, &...
From: The History of Love on 10 Apr 2020

Meet the Byrons! A scandalous 18th-century dynasty

Lovely readers, I have been very quiet on here as late – partly because I am a shy & retiring wallflower but MAINLY because I have been writing my first big fat history book: The Fall of the House of Byron.  In the midst of – *gestures...
From: The History of Love on 9 Apr 2020

Animal Victims of Crime

By Cassie Watson and Laura Sellers; posted 27 March 2020. In our previous work on the Leeds–based forensic expert Dr Thomas Scattergood, we noted that he performed toxicological analyses on more animal than human victims, including horses, cattle,...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 27 Mar 2020

The Turducken of Maastricht

When I gave a talk on fossils last year at the Boerhaave Museum in Leiden, my Dutch friends told me to be sure to include a mention of the Maastricht mosasaur, the most famous fossil in the Netherlands, even though I was actually talking about much more...
From: Anita Guerrini on 20 Mar 2020

“Not to trust the said boy out of his sight”

After young Charles Bourgate accused both his master, Edward Manwaring, and his master’s alibi witness, John Munro, of participating in the Boston Massacre, as I related here, Manwaring summoned “a third person who happened to be that Evening...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Mar 2020

The Needle’s Currency

I’ve been meaning to do a post on embroidery for a while. Needlecraft hardly seems new, or current, but I have students knitting in class, I follow a great twitter account (#womensart & also a great blog) which features amazing textile...
From: streets of salem on 10 Mar 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.