The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Animals"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Animals found 331 posts

The peacock “at home”

Author: Dorset, Catherine Ann Turner, 1750?-1817? Title: The peacock “at home” : a sequel to The butterfly’s ball / written by a lady, and illustrated with elegant engravings. Edition: New ed., with new plates. Published: London : J. Harris,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 9 Sep 2021

The recipe for animal sacrifice in ancient Greece

By Flint Dibble We’re so used to modern, twenty-first century recipes. Everything is spelled out to a tee: ingredients, amounts, instructions. But, even if you look at earlier 20th century recipes, the detail is sparser. Techniques and amounts could...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Sep 2021

The Hare, the Hound, the Chicken, the Pig … Meet Ireland’s Revolutionary Animals

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By Ann...
From: Age of Revolutions on 2 Aug 2021

Liberty, Utility, Proximity: Animals and Animaliers at the Jardin des Plantes Menagerie in Paris

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By Maria...
From: Age of Revolutions on 26 Jul 2021

Chinese American Herbal Medicine: A History of Importation and Improvisation

By Tamara Venit Shelton “Chinese herbalists imported everything from China.” This is what I consistently heard from herbalists I interviewed when writing Herbs and Roots: A History of Chinese Doctors in the American Medical Marketplace. As far as...
From: The Recipes Project on 22 Jul 2021

Absolute Animals: The Royal Menagerie and the Royal Labyrinth at Versailles

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By Peter...
From: Age of Revolutions on 19 Jul 2021

Animals in Jane Austen’s Novels

Inquiring readers, I recently wrote a post about the important but largely unseen parts servants played in Jane Austen’s novels. As I looked into the topic, animals were also mentioned. So much information exists that I decided to write about their...
From: Jane Austen's World on 6 Jul 2021

Join, or Die: Why Did It Have to Be Snakes?

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By J....
From: Age of Revolutions on 5 Jul 2021

A Peek at Peale’s Mastodon

Earlier this month, Ben at Extinct Monsters shared a report on Charles Willson Peale’s mounted mastodon skeleton, now on exhibit at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C. Ben wrote: Exhumed in 1799 near the banks of the Hudson River...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jun 2021

The Regimental Goat and “Memory Creep”

The stories of the Royal Welch Fusiliers’ goat and the Battle of Bunker Hill are a good example of what I call “memory creep.”As one writer picks up a story from another, he or she can change it slightly—either through error or through wishfully...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Jun 2021

“A poor drum-boy, killed by the goat on St David’s Day”

In 1832 the United Service Journal, and Naval and Military Magazine ran an unsigned article titled “Record of the Services of the Twenty-Third Regiment, or Royal Welsh Fusileers." In describing that regiment’s losses at the Battle of Bunker Hill,...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Jun 2021

The Dogs of War: The Animals of the Internal Armed Conflict in Peru (1980-2000)

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By Fritz...
From: Age of Revolutions on 21 Jun 2021

“Hardly men left enough to saddle their goat!”

Francis Grose (1731-1791, shown here) had a short career in the British army, filling the lowest officer’s rank of cornet during the 1740s. He later became a militia captain and adjutant. But his heart was in historical research. Grose, a hard-working...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jun 2021

“Mounted on the goat richly caparisoned for the occasion”

Robert Donkin was born in 1727 and by the eventful year of 1745 was an officer in the British army. In the Seven Years’ War he served as an aide to Gen. Thomas Fowke and Gen. William Rufane. In 1772 Capt. Donkin married Mary Collins, daughter of a clergyman....
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jun 2021

“St. David, mounted on a Goat”

In investigating the myths and realities of goat mascots in the 23rd Regiment of Foot, or Royal Welch Fusiliers, I’ll start with a fine inside source on that unit in the Revolutionary War, the diary of Lt. Frederick Mackenzie (c. 1731-1824, shown here...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jun 2021

A Goat from Bunker Hill?

Because today is the anniversary of the Battle of Bunker Hill, I’m stepping away from the topics of medical diagnosis and post-traumatic stress in the Revolutionary War to address a different burning question:Was there a goat at the Battle of Bunker...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Jun 2021

The Phillips House

I can’t believe that I’ve been blogging here for eleven+ years and have not featured 1) the only house museum; 2) the only house belonging to Historic New England; and 3) the only house which was (partially) moved to its site on the street where I...
From: streets of salem on 8 Jun 2021

Red Meat for Empire: New England Cattle, the British Empire, and the Disruption of Revolution

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By Strother...
From: Age of Revolutions on 24 May 2021

“At the time the said Horse and Sulky was furnished”

The challenges of managing Lt. Col. Abijah Brown drew me away from the episode that initially drew my attention to him—Col. Richard Gridley’s 1786 request to the Continental Congress to reimburse him for the cost of a horse killed at Bunker...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 May 2021

“The Horse so furnished was Killed at the Battle”

Yesterday I discussed Richard Gridley’s petitions to the post-war Continental Congress to keep compensating him for the loss of his Crown pension from the previous wars. Both Gridley and the Congress were caught in the 1780s economy, when there...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 May 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.