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Search Results for "Apothecaries"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Apothecaries found 52 posts

‘It Brought Much Slime Out of the Gutts and Made Me Cheerfull’: Defining Intoxicants in the Diary of Robert Hooke

The word ‘intoxicant’ has a central place in this project, as in wider scholarship. But what does the term really mean, and why do historians use it so regularly? Intoxicant is mainly used mainly to describe products which intoxicate – that ‘fuddle...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 5 Mar 2022

Worlds of Opiates Webinar

The project rounded out 2021 with a ‘big bang’ in Amsterdam, when work on opium by our Utrecht research team was translated into a unique project in public space: Worlds of Opiates, a pop-up exhibition co-created with artist Corne van der Stelt, Het...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 6 Jan 2022

New Project Exhibition: Worlds of Opiates

From 3–31 December, our Utrecht research team will hold a free pop-up exhibition for the general public at Amsterdam Central Station, one of the city’s major thoroughfares. The interactive show, organised in conjunction with the Poppi Drug Museum...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 20 Dec 2021

Loten’s Dagwyser (1783): A Notebook of a Reluctant Dutch Opium Eater

In Utrecht University Library there is a Dagwyser, or almanac, for the year 1783, which formerly belonged to Joan Gideon Loten (1710–1789), a Dutchman, who had been Governor of Makassar [Sulawesi, Indonesia] (1744–1749) and Ceylon [Sri Lanka] (1752–1757)...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 17 Nov 2021

Remembering Terry Turner (1929-2019): Pharmaceutical History Collector Extraordinaire

By Laurence Totelin, with input from Briony Hudson A few years ago, my colleagues Heather Trickey (social sciences), Julia Sanders (midwifery) and I decided to put together a small exhibition on the history of infant feeding, with a focus on Wales where...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Jun 2021

Bulk Medicine and Waged Labor in Eighteenth-Century London

By Zachary Dorner In the eighteenth century, druggists, chemists, and apothecaries began producing medicines in larger quantities for sale in a variety of markets, resulting in a more coherent manufacturing sector in Britain. Making medicines at...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Dec 2020

Exploring London’s Intoxicating Spaces Through Mudlarking

The River Thames as it flows through London is tidal, meaning twice per day part of the riverbed is exposed for a few hours. This area, known as the Thames foreshore, is a rich archive of (among other things) the remnants of two millennia of the city’s...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 2 Dec 2020

Canine Cures or Our Best Friend…

By Marc Bruck To paraphrase the old adage: dogs are humanity’s best friend. Loving, loyal and protective, they are often considered members of the family. They are symbols of wealth and power, love and affection. Recent accounts in the popular press,...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Nov 2020

Precious Secrets – Pearls & Coral in Early Modern Recipes

By Juliet Claxton Pearls and coral have been worn on the body not only for adornment, but also for the belief in their powerful and mysterious properties as an effective prophylaxis against injury and disease. In literature, Elaine the lily maid of Astolat...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Nov 2020

Beer, Wine, and Spirits: Reflections on Intoxicants and Ghosts

This spooky season – while holed up in an isolated North Yorkshire farmhouse in the shadow of a Bly-esque seventeenth-century manor – I’ve been thinking about the connections between intoxicants and ghosts, which don’t seem to...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 31 Oct 2020

Revising Tillmann Taape’s Recipes against the plague – in pharmaceutical code?

Editor’s note: Today we revisit a post originally published in 2013 by Tillmann Taape on plague remedies given by the apothecary Hieronymus Brunschwig in his Liber pestilentialis (1500). The book included an interesting mix of recipes in the...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 May 2020

Intoxicating Pharmacies? Apothecary Shops and New Intoxicants in Amsterdam, 1600–185

Thinking about intoxicating spaces, apothecary shops are probably not what first springs to mind. Yet, these places are very relevant in discussing the assimilation of new intoxicants into European diets. It may seem strange to us today, but they virtually...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 6 Mar 2020

Basel Pharmacy Museum: An Interview

The Recipes Project heads to Basel, Switzerland, to learn about the collections of the Pharmacy Museum. Laurence Totelin spoke with Philippe Wanner,  Barbara Orland, Corinne Eichenberger and Martin Kluge. Could you give us a brief overview of your...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 Nov 2019

Tales from the Archives: Drinkable Gold for the King of Siam

In my first months of co-editing duties here at The Recipes Project, one of my many delights has been the opportunity to dig back in our archives to rediscover posts I’ve loved over the years, to see them with fresh eyes. As a historian of Japan,...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Apr 2019

The Apothecary Fold.

The apothecary fold is an 18th century paper container that apothecaries made to hold prescriptions. These same containers can be used to hold herbs or spices in your knapsack.My thanks to weaver, one of our group members for bringing this item to my...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 4 Dec 2018

Tales From the Archives: A Recipe for Disaster: How Not to Distill Turpentine

In September 2018, The Recipes Project will be six years old. There’s been a lot of blogging on this platform, and we are so grateful to all our wonderful contributors. But with so much material on the site, it’s easy for earlier...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 Aug 2018

The Senses of the Apothecary in Early Modern Italy

By Barbara Di Gennaro Splendore The making of remedies today, especially industrial pharmaceuticals, relies very little the human senses, or at least this is how we imagine it. Industrial pharmaceutical recipes, we believe, are and should be impersonal...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Apr 2018

Recipes and the Senses: An Introduction

By Hannah Newton   Our enjoyment of food depends not just on how it tastes and smells, but also on what it looks, feels, and sounds like. Crispness, for instance, is perceived when we hear a ‘snap’ as the food breaks between our teeth....
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Apr 2018

The First Blackfriars: A Workshop Reflection

On Sunday, we, the Dolphin’s Back, and a room-full of participants were lucky enough to see the history of the Blackfriars and the First Playhouse brought to life on the very spot on which it once stood. Thanks to the Society of Apothecaries, London,...
From: Before Shakespeare on 23 Feb 2018

The First Blackfriars Playhouse 1576-84: Ownership, Repertoire, Audience

On the 18th February, Before Shakespeare and The Dolphin’s Back will return Elizabethan drama to the site of the First (and Second) Blackfriars Playhouse(s).  We are hosting a workshop in the Apothecaries’ Hall, built on what was formerly...
From: Before Shakespeare on 24 Jan 2018

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