The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Archaeology"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Archaeology found 322 posts

Tomb: John, Lord Cheyney (Cheyne/Cheney)

Where is the tomb? It is located in Salisbury Cathedral, under the arcade on the north side of the nave and just west of the crossing. Was it always in this location? No. The tomb was originally placed in the … Continue reading →
From: Kirsten Claiden-Yardley on 15 Sep 2021

The recipe for animal sacrifice in ancient Greece

By Flint Dibble We’re so used to modern, twenty-first century recipes. Everything is spelled out to a tee: ingredients, amounts, instructions. But, even if you look at earlier 20th century recipes, the detail is sparser. Techniques and amounts could...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 Sep 2021

Unearthing a New Acadia

Hilary Doda This post begins an occasional series on Material Histories. Using artifacts as a lens, frameworks from archaeology and other fields of material history can be extremely helpful for historians seeking to incorporate different, often non-literate,...
From: Borealia on 31 May 2021

Cherries Galore in a Cesspit

By Merit Hondelink As an archaeobotanist, an archaeologist specialised in studying plant remains found in archaeological excavations, I aim to reconstruct and interpret the relationships between humans and plants in the past. Archaeological plant remains,...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 May 2021

Cover Reveal: THE COLLECTOR'S DAUGHTER by Gill Paul

I'm excited to share with you today the cover of Gill Paul's new novel, THE COLLECTOR'S DAUGHTER: A Novel of the Discovery of Tutankhamun's Tomb. Gill is a masterful storyteller, and this novel promises to be a gripping read:Bestselling author Gill Paul...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 17 Mar 2021

Watch: Finnish divers discover well-preserved 17th century shipwreck

https://yle.fi/uutiset/osasto/news/watch_finnish_divers_discover_well-preserved_17th_century_shipwreck/11505324
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 23 Aug 2020

Box Office Bears: a new research project on animal-baiting

Box Office Bears has begun! But who were they and what does it mean? We are delighted to announce the start of the £978,319 AHRC-funded project ‘Box Office Bears (BOB): Animal baiting in early modern England’, officially starting...
From: Before Shakespeare on 3 Aug 2020

CFP: Materializing Race in #VastEarlyAmerica

Materializing Race: An Unconference on Objects and Identity in #VastEarlyAmerica August 24 and 25, 2020 1 PM EST both days (Zoom) Proposals due by August 1, 2020 Organized by Cynthia Chin and Philippe Halbert In a commitment to fostering nuanced interpretations...
From: The Junto on 20 Jul 2020

The pioneering archaeologist Dorothy Garrod

On 6 May 1939 the pioneering archaeologist Dorothy Garrod was elected to the Disney chair of archaeology at Cambridge. She was the first woman to be a professor at either Oxford or Cambridge; women were still not admitted to full degrees at the university...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

The possible discovery of the Red Lion, London’s first Elizabethan playhouse

In the latest A Bit Lit film, the theatre historian and Before Shakespeare advisor Holger Syme speaks to Andy Kesson about last month’s announcement of the discovery of the Red Lion site, complete with a possible playhouse. See the film here, and...
From: Before Shakespeare on 6 Jul 2020

‘Revolutions So Remote’: Revolutionary Thinking and Archaeological Inquiry

This piece is a part of our ongoing series, entitle “Rethinking the Revolutionary Canon.”  By Catherine J. Frieman The Marxist archaeologist V. Gordon Childe was among the highest profile archaeologists of the twentieth century. In the...
From: Age of Revolutions on 1 Jun 2020

#SaluteToStratford: Shakespeare and Welcombe

Ridge and furrow markings in the field, Clopton House behind As their contribution to Shakespeare’s Birthday this year, the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust has created #SaluteToStratford, where people can share what makes Stratford special to them....
From: The Shakespeare blog on 28 Apr 2020

How shipwreck hunter's search for a sunken galleon and lost engraved stone could rewrite Australian history by proving the Spanish landed more than a CENTURY before Captain Cook

Copywrite Ben Cropp.A shipwreck hunter has launched a new expedition to search for a sunken Spanish galleon and engraved stone lost in Queensland that, if found, could rewrite Australia's history.  Veteran documentary maker Ben Cropp is determined...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 13 Apr 2020

Publication: “The Alliance of Pirates: Ireland and Atlantic piracy in the early seventeenth century” by Connie Kelleher

Publication: The Alliance of Pirates: Ireland and Atlantic piracy in the early seventeenth century by Connie Kelleher In the early part of the seventeenth-century, along the southwest coast of Ireland, piracy was a way of life. Following the outlawing...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 8 Apr 2020

The Head of a Roman

For the past few weeks, many news outlets have reported that the skull of Pliny the Elder (Gaius Plinius Secundus, ca. 23-79 CE), the Roman naturalist and statesman who died at Pompeii, has been identified.  The latest story, in the New York Times,...
From: Anita Guerrini on 24 Feb 2020

Tanning Hides to make Leather in the 18th Century.

Tanning Hides to make Leather in the 18th Century.The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Leatherworker in Eighteenth-CenturyWilliamsburg, by Thomas K. FordThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere in the United States andmost other parts of the world at...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 24 Feb 2020

Students learn life as 18th century child. Experimental Archaeology.

Students dressed in 18th century clothing making an apple Pomander Ball.More information here: https://www.victoriaadvocate.com/news/education/students-learn-life-as-th-century-child/article_3f315b26-193b-11ea-9cce-2bc03133f052.html
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 10 Dec 2019

Bottle gourds floated to the New World from Africa

Bottle gourds floated to the New World from Africa.For thousands of years, bottle gourds have been cultivated for use the world over as drinking vessels, medicine bottles and even fishing bobs. A new study looks at how they got to the Americas from their...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 26 Nov 2019

New Additions To My Equipment.

17th-century Jamestown settlers unwind silk fiber from cocoonsdetail of a painting by NPS artist Sydney KingI know, usually I am looking to remove things from my knapsack, but I had a reason to add some things recently. A long time ago a close friend...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 13 Nov 2019

Mudlarking on the Thames, Part 2: What can we do with Fragments and Waste?

In Rubbish Theory, Michael Thompson argues that there are three kinds of value categories: ‘transient’ or ‘here today, gone tomorrow’; ‘durable’ or ‘a joy forever’; and rubbish. Things can move between categories,...
From: Middling Culture on 16 Oct 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.