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Revisiting He Bian’s Fetch Me at Pearl Nest Street: Rhubarb Pills as Panacea in Qing China

Today we revisit He Bian’s fascinating post from 2018. Here, He tells us about the global trade in Chinese rhubarb (dahuang) roots, panaceas and notions of difference in premodern theories of the body. Fascinated by this post and want to learn more...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Jul 2020

Online Archives Unlocked: What’s in it for Crime Historians?

By Cassie Watson; posted 13 June 2020. At a time when none of us can go to any archive, I decided to investigate the online contents of collections made temporarily available to university staff and students during the Covid-19 pandemic. I also purchased...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 13 Jun 2020

Getting to know John Balshaw – Part

This is the second in a short series of posts on my research into John Balshaw’s Jig. It’s a short ‘musical comedy’ written by a man in Brindle, Lancashire, in the mid-seventeenth century.  I found the manuscript in the British...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 12 Jun 2020

Revisiting Diana Luft’s Treating the Stone in Sixteenth-Century Wales

Today we revisit a post originally published in 2017 by Diana Luft on a sixteenth-century recipe against the stone ascribed to a certain Vicar of Gwenddwr, Wales. The recipe is in Welsh, but includes names of some ingredients in English, perhaps indicating...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 May 2020

New Deal Salem

A couple of years ago I complained about the lack of WPA murals in any of Salem’s public buildings: this struck me, as an impression and little else, as a lack of New Deal investment in Depression-era Salem. I’ve had time to survey the paper...
From: streets of salem on 11 May 2020

Revisiting Lisa Smith’s Coffee: A Remedy Against the Plague

Editor’s note: Today, we revisit a post by our editor Lisa Smith on the use of coffee as an eighteenth century cure-all against smallpox and the plague. The botanist Richard Bradley claimed that coffee would be effective in treating such diseases...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 May 2020

Madame d’Aulnoy’s productive confinement

According to many critics today, Madame d’Aulnoy’s contes des fées originated in the sociable setting of her salon. Jack Zipes, the doyen of American fairy-tale studies, summarizes the prevailing view: In 1685 she received permission...
From: Anecdota on 2 May 2020

Meet the Byrons! A scandalous 18th-century dynasty

Lovely readers, I have been very quiet on here as late – partly because I am a shy & retiring wallflower but MAINLY because I have been writing my first big fat history book: The Fall of the House of Byron.  In the midst of – *gestures...
From: The History of Love on 9 Apr 2020

Appel à candidatures – Atelier de formation doctorale – Archives de la recherche archéologique

L’École française de Rome et le Centre Jean Bérard en partenariat avec l’Institut national d’histoire de l’art organise un atelier de formation doctorale sur l’apport des archives historiques à...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 2 Apr 2020

Quarantines in Salem

I’m pretty familiar with the origins of the quarantine, having taught classes on or in the era of the Black Death for twenty years: quaranta (40) days that ships were required to anchor in the harbor off Venice before they could unload their...
From: streets of salem on 31 Mar 2020

Corona Courses: My Top Ten Sources of Digital Content

So I have just finished converting my lecture courses into online formats: difficult to do midstream. A well-designed online course is a beautiful thing, but if a course is based on a more personal form of delivery and has to become virtual overnight...
From: streets of salem on 24 Mar 2020

Around the Table: Events

This month on Around the Table, we will learn about the Folger Shakespeare Library’s tradition of teatime. Since renovations recently began at the Folger, the Library’s afternoon tea has also undergone some changes in order to keep the Folger...
From: The Recipes Project on 17 Mar 2020

Tales from the Archives: Community Conversations

The theme for this month is community, inspired by the UK university strikes in February and March.  Community is at the heart of the dispute: what do we want universities to look like? The wonderful sense of community that emerges on picket lines...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Mar 2020

Around the Table: Museum Exhibitions

By Sarah Peters Kernan The Christian liturgical season of Lent is upon us. Centuries ago, this was a long and difficult period of fasting in Europe. Some Christians still abstained from all meat and animal products for the forty days of Lent, others undertook...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Mar 2020

A Snapshot of the Food Studies Community

By Christian Reynolds From October to December 2019, the US-UK Food Digital Scholarship Network ran a community survey asking what (and how) food scholars are currently using analogue and digital material. We were also interested how the community thought...
From: The Recipes Project on 3 Mar 2020

Appel à candidature : « Les sources au travail : Galeries-anti-Galeries » (Paris, 1-10 juillet 2020)

Gordon Matta-Clark, Fonds Biennale de Paris, 1975, BDP 135 © Bibliothèque Kandinsky, Mnam-Cci, Centre Pompidou 1-10 Juillet 2020 UNIVERSITÉ D’ÉTÉ de la BIBLIOTHÈQUE KANDINSKY Appel à candidature/ Call...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 27 Feb 2020

Conférence : « Time in Fashion » de Caroline Evans – Association Sartoria (Paris, 20 février 2020)

Rencontre avec Caroline Evans (University of the Arts London), 20 février 2020, INHA, Salle Demargne, 18h-20h A l’occasion de la sortie de son nouvel ouvrage Time in Fashion (prévue le 06/08/2020), nous avons le plaisir de recevoir...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 18 Feb 2020

Sisters in Arms

I’ve been searching high and low for Salem suffragists, and I have found some, but it’s been a difficult search as there are no extant papers of the “Woman Suffrage Club” of Salem that I can find: newspaper articles, a few flyers,...
From: streets of salem on 1 Feb 2020

The End of Mill Hill?

Place names are a topic I have not explored much on this blog, which is odd, as they represent a major entry into the local past. There’s a great article in the old Essex Institute Historical Collections (Volume 31, 1894-95; it was also printed...
From: streets of salem on 28 Jan 2020

January 2020: a Taste of “Before ‘Farm to Table'” Part IV

Dear Recipes Project community, Happy 2020! This month we’ll mark the new year by highlighting some discoveries from the Before “Farm to Table”: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures project, a Mellon initiative in collaborative research...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Jan 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.