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Your search for posts with tags containing Article found 581 posts

The Ashburnham House fire

The British Library’s manuscript collection is built on that amassed by antiquarian Sir Robert Cotton in the early 17th century. Gifted to the nation in 1701, it was stored at Essex House on the Strand for several years before safety concerns led...
From: Mathew Lyons on 24 Nov 2020

The first Svengali

Whenever Dominic Cummings makes the headlines, commentators reach for the same word to describe his relationship with the prime minister: he is Boris Johnson’s Svengali, they write. But who was the original Svengali? Svengali is one of those rare...
From: Mathew Lyons on 20 Nov 2020

Rodrigo, “Influence of Meteorological Conditions on the Yellow Fever Epidemic,” “Atmosphere,” April

Fernando S. Rodrigo, “The Influence of Meteorological Conditions on the Yellow Fever Epidemic in Cádiz (Southern Spain) in 1800: A Historical Scientific Controversy,” Atmosphere 11/4 (2020).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 17 Nov 2020

Hildegard of Bingen

The visions began when Hildegard of Bingen was young – perhaps as young as three. But unlike many mystical religious experiences, the visions did not come in dreams or ecstatic states; ecstasy, she thought, was a defect. They came like a cloud of...
From: Mathew Lyons on 17 Nov 2020

A philosopher queen remembered

Ahilyabai Holkar, queen of the Malwa kingdom in north-west central India, part of the Maratha empire, died on 13 August 1795, having reigned for nearly thirty years. She came to power in 1767 after the deaths of her father in law, Malhar Rao Holkar, and...
From: Mathew Lyons on 16 Nov 2020

The Constitutional Convention Debates the Electoral College

In the last two decades, the Electoral College has come under harsh, though derivative, criticism as a result of the presidential elections in 2000... The post The Constitutional Convention Debates the Electoral College appeared first on Journal of the...

Print Quarterly, September

Johann Jakob Mettenleiter, Double Portrait of Johann Elias Haid and Johann Jakob Mettenleiter, ca. 1778–84, oil on copper, 31 × 38 cm (image courtesy Boris Wilnitsky Fine Arts, Vienna). ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊  ◊...
From: Enfilade on 2 Nov 2020

Bertomeu-Sánchez, “Colic of Madrid” in Social History of Medicine, Aug

José Ramón Bertomeu-Sánchez, “Colic of Madrid (1788-1814): Experts, Poisons, Politics, and War at the End of the Ancien Régime in Spain,” Social History of Medicine 33/3 (2020).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 21 Oct 2020

Seminar on John Dickinson and the Constitution, Starting 21 Oct.

Back in 2012 I made a point about the steady flow of books on Thomas Paine by comparing that output to the sparse number of books on John Dickinson.I counted over a dozen recent books on Paine and only two on Dickinson—one published by an outfit...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Oct 2020

Rhodes, “Indecent Theology” in RQ Fall

Elizabeth Rhodes, “Indecent Theology: Sex and Female Heresy in Counter-Reformation Spain,” Renaissance Quarterly 73/3 (2020).
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 3 Oct 2020

St Kilda: the last and outmost isle

The small archipelago of St Kilda, fifty miles west of Harris, has long attracted romantic attention for its remoteness, with the sense of deep strangeness and difference such remoteness implies. it is the last and outmost isle, the island on the edge...
From: Mathew Lyons on 1 Oct 2020

When graduates voted twice

With support for the EU significantly higher among those with a university education, it’s interesting to recall that well into the 20th century graduates could vote twice in UK general elections: once in their local constituencies and again through...
From: Mathew Lyons on 30 Sep 2020

Manuela Sáenz: the Liberator’s saviour

On the night of September 25 1828, a small group of armed men approached the presidential palace in Bogotá. Inside, Simón Bolívar lay in bed asleep beside his mistress, Manuela Sáenz. Bolívar – known as El Liberator...
From: Mathew Lyons on 29 Sep 2020

De Vivo, “Micro-Histories of Long-Distance Information,” P&P 242/14, Nov 2019

Filippo de Vivo, “Micro-Histories of Long-Distance Information: Space, Movement, and Agency in the Early Modern News,” Past & Present, 242, Special Supplement 14, 2019.
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 11 Sep 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Christopher Warren on Documents of the American Revolution

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews Christopher Warren, historian and Curator of American History in the Rare Book & Special Collections Division of the... The post This Week on Dispatches: Christopher Warren on...

The end of a European union

A decades-long union of European countries is supported by the respective national elites; but its destruction comes through the ruthless exploitation of popular nationalism by an autocratic leader. Does that sound familiar? It is, of course, the Kalmar...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp: the film Churchill tried to kill

It’s 10 September 1942. The German army is at Stalingrad. Bomber Command is sending 479 planes to bomb Düsseldorf. And Winston Churchill is writing to Brendan Bracken, his Minister of Information, about a British film already in production....
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

Literary Review: Sons of the Waves by Stephen Taylor

At their peak, early in the 19th century, there were some 262,427 of them across Britain’s naval and merchant fleets. People called them Jacks, but they are nameless mostly. Or nameless to history. Even on surviving musters, their identities can...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

The pioneering archaeologist Dorothy Garrod

On 6 May 1939 the pioneering archaeologist Dorothy Garrod was elected to the Disney chair of archaeology at Cambridge. She was the first woman to be a professor at either Oxford or Cambridge; women were still not admitted to full degrees at the university...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

How two Greek monks remade the English church

Five of the first six archbishops of Canterbury to be consecrated were not native to this country. None came from as far afield as the seventh: Theodore, born in 602, was a Greek-speaking monk from Tarsus – the modern Turkish city of Gözlü...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.