The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Astrolabe"

Your search for posts with tags containing Astrolabe found 17 posts

Astrolabe or Mariner’s Astrolabe?

I am always happy to see bits from the history of science playing some role in contemporary political culture. So I delighted in hearing that as Portugal handed over the presidency of the EU to Slovenia, the Portuguese also gave them an astrolabe. I wonder,...
From: Darin Hayton on 3 Sep 2021

What is an Astrolabe?

Since 1991 the astrolabe has appeared on Jeopardy[1], either in the clue or as the answer 13 times.[2] After being an answer twice in 1991, the show seemed to forget about the astrolabe for more than a decade before slotting it in with some regularity....
From: Darin Hayton on 1 Sep 2021

Persian Astrolabes on Auction

Bloomberg of all places reported last month on two Persian astrolabes coming up for auction at Sotheby’s. Why I don’t really know. The article itself is brief, really just a paragraph or two, and seems to be a string of staccato like factoids:...
From: Darin Hayton on 7 Apr 2021

Monks Using Astronomical Instruments

The manuscript Ambrosiana H 57 sup. includes two texts on the astrolabe, Philoponus’s as well as an anonymous one from perhaps the late 13th century (though this copy is dated 14th century). Along with these texts are a couple Ptolemaic works and...
From: Darin Hayton on 26 Jan 2021

Prospect: The Light Ages by Seb Falk

There are few easier ways to enrage a medievalist than to refer to the era they study as ‘the Dark Ages’. But those who think of the medieval world – and medieval Catholicism in particular – as the antithesis of reason and progress,...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Nov 2020

Byzantine Astrolabe (sort of)

In a fragment attributed to John Kamateros on the astrolabe are a handful of interesting diagrams illustrating the various parts of an astrolabe. Here is the diagram showing the rete. An illustration of an astrolabe’s rete, found in a 15th-century...
From: Darin Hayton on 20 Jan 2020

Of Astrolabes and Wine

Further evidence that astrolabes are infiltrating culture is the name of winery in New Zealand: Astrolabe. A winery in New Zealand has adopted the name “Astrolabe.” Unfortunately, this winery is not really named after the instrument. Instead,...
From: Darin Hayton on 15 Oct 2019

The Byzantine Astrolabe

I can’t reconstruct how I came across this page, but now that I have I can’t let it go without some comment. A search for the pair of terms “Brescia astrolabe” or “Byzantine astrolabe” gives as the second result a link...
From: Darin Hayton on 6 Oct 2019

Astrolabes & Navigation (redux, again)

A friend recently visited Philadelphia’s Please Touch Museum and came across the reference to the astrolabe in Muslim culture. Thinking of me, she snapped a photo and sent it to me: “The Science of Navigation” panel inaccurately claims...
From: Darin Hayton on 23 Jul 2019

GoT Starbucks Cups and Astrolabes

Game of Thrones fans, and a disturbingly large part of the internet, erupted over an errant paper coffee cup, complete with plastic sippy lid that somehow found its way onto a table on set. For a few seconds during the feast celebrating the defeat of...
From: Darin Hayton on 1 Jun 2019

Pre-Modern High Tech

Last month the Washington Post ran a short article by Erin Blakemore on medieval scientific instruments, “Think smartphones are astonishing? Discover the ‘high tech’ devices of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.” It was a little...
From: Darin Hayton on 8 Jan 2019

Astrolabes and S•Town

On Thursday, February 16, at 5:36 PM I was standing in a faculty meeting when my phone vibrated. I fished it out of my pocket and looked at the screen. I had just received a voicemail and a text from the same number, a number I didn’t recognize....
From: Darin Hayton on 9 May 2017

A Spherical Astrolabe

The only spherical astrolabe that survives is this one made in A.H. 885 (1480 CE), most likely somewhere in present-day Syria. Today it is in the Museum of the History of Science, item # 49687.The most common type of astrolabe is the planispheric astrolabe,...
From: Darin Hayton on 18 Dec 2016

Astrolabes on Iraqi Banknotes

In 2003 the Coalition Provisional Authority that governed Iraq issued a new 250 dinar note decorated with an astrolabe.[1]In late 2003 the Coalition Provisional Authority governing Iraq introduced new banknotes and coins to replace the Hussein government’s...
From: Darin Hayton on 12 Dec 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS: Netherlandish Art and Luxury Goods in Renaissance Spain Trade, Patronage and Consumption

University of Leuven, Belgium, 4-6 February 2016International conferenceInitiated and organized byIlluminare – Centre for the Study of Medieval Art | KU LeuvenIn 2010, Illuminare – Centre for the Study of Medieval Art (KU Leuven) acquired...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 4 Feb 2016

Astrolabes or Mariner’s Astrolabe—A Primer

Celebrations are afoot in Ontario celebrating 400 years of Francophone presence in the region. An important part of those celebrations is Samuel de Champlain’s exploration of Ontario and his early encounter with First Nations cultures. Simcoe.com...
From: Darin Hayton on 22 Jul 2015

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.