The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Atlas"

Your search for posts with tags containing Atlas found 8 posts

Cary’s survey of the high roads from London to Hampton Court

Covers south east portion of England. Roads are from London to: Hampton Court, Bagshot, Oakingham, Binfield, Windsor, Maidenhead, High Wycombe, Amersham, Rickmansworth, Tring, St. Albans, Welwyn, Hertford, Ware, Bishops Stortford, Chipping Ongar, Chelmsford,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 14 Sep 2017

Atlas Obscura but Not So Accurata

Atlas Obscura seems to have reached a point that it no longer can describe itself as, well, obscura. The website enjoys more than 300,000 pageviews each day and has produced a book, which is currently the “#1 Best Seller in General Travel Reference”...
From: Darin Hayton on 10 Mar 2017

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 8

Nymph of the garden where all beauties be; Beauties which do in excellency pass His who till death looked in a watery glass, Or hers, whom naked the Trojan boy did see; Sweet garden nymph, which keeps the cherry tree, Whose fruit doth...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 21 Aug 2015

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 77

Those looks, whose beams be joy, whose motion is delight; That face, whose lecture shows what perfect beauty is; That presence, which doth give dark hearts a living light; That grace, which Venus weeps that she herself doth miss; That hand,...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 15 Jun 2015

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 51

Pardon mine ears, both I and they do pray, So may your tongue still fluently proceed, To them that do such entertainment need, So may you still have somewhat new to say. On silly me do not the burden lay, Of all the grave conceits your brain doth breed; But...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 13 Jun 2014

Colloque : « Un Atlas pour s’exercer ». La forme-atlas au XXème siècle »

« Un atlas pour s’exercer », « ein Übungsatlas ». C’est ainsi que Walter Benjamin décrit dans sa Petite histoire de la Photographie (1931) le livre de photographies d’August Sander Antlitz der Zeit (1929), première présentation publique...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 4 Oct 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.