The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Ballroom"

Your search for posts with tags containing Ballroom found 7 posts

Waltzing

Six couples, some awkwardly matched, dance with varying skill in a ballroom.   Title: Waltzing [graphic]. Publication: [London] : Published by the proprietor, June 15, 1815. Catalog Record 815.06.16.01+ Acquired March 2020
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 26 Aug 2021

Dancers at a ball

An exoticly dressed man and wild hair dances with a woman in a large headdress and flowing gown as three figures look on   Artist: Cruikshank, Robert, 1789-1856, artist. Title: [Dancers at a ball] [art original] / R. Cruikshank. Production: [England],...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 15 Jun 2021

Outside the Ballroom

(“Ainsi l’Hôtel de Ville illumine.”)[1] {VI., May, 1833.} By Victor Hugo Behold the ball-room flashing on the sight, From step to cornice one grand glare of light; The noise of mirth and revelry resounds, Like fairy melody on...

A stunning 18th-century building – Newark Town Hall

Newark is an ancient market town in Nottinghamshire and taking pride of place in the town’s centre is the Georgian Town Hall, built by John Carr (1723 – 1807) in 1774, using pale grey Mansfield stone. John Carr by Sir William BeecheyCarr gained...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 Sep 2018

Madame de Staël in London

14th July 1817 saw the demise of the Swiss author, woman of letters and political thinker, aged 51, Madame Germaine de Staël.  She was regarded as a witty socialite and always wore the most fashionable if daring clothing. Living through the...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 Jul 2018

Sketch of a Ball at Almack’s, 1815

There were a number of establishments known as Almack’s over the years; today we are focusing on the famous Assembly Rooms on King Street, St James. Opened in 1765 by a Yorkshireman named William Almack (often mistakenly claimed to be a Scot named...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Jun 2018

A guide to entertaining in Regency London

Social Meetings The social meetings of the fashionable world consist of balls, musical parties, and routs. The latter appear to be formed on the model of the Italian conversaziones; except that they are in general so crowded, as entirely to preclude conversation....
From: All Things Georgian on 22 Mar 2018

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.