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Search Results for "Barbers"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Barbers found 22 posts

The Quirky World of Victorian Shaving Patents!

A major theme of my forthcoming book Concerning Beards, about the history of beards, shaving and barbers between 1650-1900, is that of the gradual commercialization of shaving. As I’ve explored in other posts, the period after 1750 saw the increasing...
From: DrAlun on 7 Jul 2020

Barbers and Shaving in the Eighteenth Century

“It is the business of the barber to cut and dress hair, to make wigs and false curls, and to shave the beards of other men. In ancient times he used, also, to trim the nails; and even in the present day, in Turkey, this is a part of his employment”....
From: DrAlun on 8 Apr 2020

Beard Sculpting in the 19th Century.

Over the course of the past four or five years or so, one of the biggest growth areas in the personal grooming industry has been in products for cleaning, styling, or beautifying the beard. A whole host of options are now available, including beard oils,...
From: DrAlun on 18 Mar 2020

A Hidden History of Beard Terms!

2020 will be a milestone for me, as it sees the completion of my research, and the submission of my book Concerning Beards: Facial Hair, Health and Practice in England, 1650-1900, in many ways bringing an end to my project on the history of facial hair...
From: DrAlun on 14 Feb 2020

The Singular Case of the Tiverton Barber

We all know the feeling of paying for something that doesn’t match up with our expectations, or not receiving the service or product we expect for our money. Many of us wouldn’t think twice of complaining, and getting a refund. But would we...
From: DrAlun on 15 Oct 2019

The Barber and the Abusive Parrot!

In the 18th and 19th centuries, the chattering barber was a comic stereotype. All sorts of satires and images lampooned the loquacious shaver, more intent on the sound of his own voice than the customer’s comfort. But in 1869 an unusual case...
From: DrAlun on 12 Jun 2019

Unnatural Fashions: Wigs and Beards in the 18th Century.

I’m showing my age now, but watch the 1981 Adam and the Ants promo video for ‘Stand and Deliver’ and, during a few scenes showing the ‘Dandy Highwaymen’ amongst a group of outlandishly-dressed Georgians, look closely and...
From: DrAlun on 10 Jan 2019

A crop shop

The interior of barber shop: On the left a man stands before a mirror, face contorted as he wipes his jaw, unaware of the boy behind him pointing and laughing at him as he holds the man’s pigtail in his hand. Another customer is shown in the center...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 14 Nov 2018

Barbers and Advertising in the 18th century.

Over the past few years, I have spent a lot of time looking at polite advertising in the 18th century. During that period, a whole range of retailers advertised their goods and services to appeal to ladies and gentlemen of taste. Without discussing anything...
From: DrAlun on 9 Mar 2018

What About Whiskers? The forgotten facial hair fashion of 19th-century Britain.

In 1843, an article appeared in the New Orleans ‘Picayune’ newspaper, titled ‘Whiskers. Or, a clean shave’. Dwelling on their utility as ‘ornamental appendages to the human face’, the authors sought to discuss how they...
From: DrAlun on 21 Jun 2017

18th-Century Barbers at the Old Bailey.

As my project on the health and medical history of facial hair rolls ever Belforward, I’ve recently turned my attention to barbers and their role in shaping and managing facial hair through time. Amongst the many questions I’m looking at are...
From: DrAlun on 28 Apr 2017

Barbers and Shaving in early modern Britain.

As the beards project rolls merrily forward, I’ve recently been turning my attention to barbers in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Over the past few months I’ve been looking at a large number of sources relating to barbers and barber-surgeons,...
From: DrAlun on 3 Apr 2017

The Cutter’s Art: A Brief History of Bloodletting

  When King Charles II suffered a sudden seizure on the morning of 2 February 1685, his personal physician had just the remedy. He quickly slashed open a vein in the king’s left arm and filled a basin with the royal blood. Over the next few...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 28 Jul 2016

Beards…or no Beards?

(Image from Wikimedia Commons) It’s summer 2016, and beards are still pulling headlines in the news. A report on last week’s Financial Times website suggested that men are spending 20% more year on year, on niche products. One observer notes...
From: DrAlun on 1 Jun 2016

Slashing Throats for 170 Years: The “Real” Sweeney Todd

To most people, Sweeney Todd needs no introduction, thanks in part to Tim Burton’s 2007 adaptation of Stephen Sondheim’s musical, starring Johnny Depp as the throat-slashing barber of Fleet Street. In the movie, Todd dumps the bodies of his...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 30 Oct 2015

Many a good razor has been cast aside as useless…

At foot of the first page: “Sold by the proprietor, G. Packwood, 16, Gracechurch-street London.” On the verso: “Vended in London by the following perfumers” and “Vended in the country by the following perfumers.” ...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 5 Oct 2015

Brand new for BBC Arts: The Barbershop in the 18th century – presented by Dr Alun Withey

Click the link below and the programme should load in a separate window.Then, to play the programme, click the red square in the bottom left, or else you’ll be left with a massive image of me that doesn’t move…and that can’t be...
From: DrAlun on 1 Apr 2015

Zounds how you scrape! Being shaved in Georgian Britain.

Last week, for the first time in my life, I was the lucky recipient of a wet shave with a cut throat razor. As part of my duties as a BBC/AHRC ‘New Generation Thinker’ I was making a short film about shaving in Georgian Britain, the conclusion of...
From: DrAlun on 1 Mar 2015

Policing Medical Practice in the 17th Century

A brief note before jumping into the newest post: Apologies, I’ve been (mostly) AWOL from both the blog and  Twitter for just over a month now.  Regular updates/posts will resume shortly.  p.s. the thesis defense went well – I’m finally...

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Caveats and Work in Progress

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.