The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Battle of Camden"

Your search for posts with tags containing Battle of Camden found 16 posts

The Battle of Shallow Ford, October 14, 178

In September 1780, writing from Hillsborough, North Carolina, just one month after the disastrous defeat at Camden, Maj. Gen. Horatio Gates penned a disconcerted... The post The Battle of Shallow Ford, October 14, 1780 appeared first on Journal of the...

The Slings and Arrows of Outrageous Misfortune: The Fall of Fort Motte

The Revolutionary War in the Carolinas after the fall of Charleston was a great arena of war with hundreds of small battlefields. Some were... The post The Slings and Arrows of Outrageous Misfortune: The Fall of Fort Motte appeared first on Journal of...

Mapping the Battle of Eutaw Springs: Modern GIS Solves a Historic Mystery

When dealing with available sources to investigate questions related to historical events, the researcher has at his disposal a limited set from which to... The post Mapping the Battle of Eutaw Springs: Modern GIS Solves a Historic Mystery appeared first...

A French “King of America”?

In the chaos of war, there are, and have always been, schemers who will try to take advantage of disorder to enrich themselves, either... The post A French “King of America”? appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Midsummer 1780 in the Carolinas and Georgia—Events predating the Battle of Camden

Besides dealing with events elsewhere, this article relates in particular the plight of the Carolina loyalists and the way in which British ascendancy in... The post Midsummer 1780 in the Carolinas and Georgia—Events predating the Battle of Camden...

To the End of the World: Cornwallis Pursues Morgan to the Catawba

As Daniel Morgan collected his prisoners on the morning of January 17, 1781, he knew Charles, Lord Cornwallis, could not be far behind. “The... The post To the End of the World: Cornwallis Pursues Morgan to the Catawba appeared first on Journal...

Major James Wemyss: Second Most Hated British Officer in the South

No British officer was more reviled by Patriots in the South during the American Revolution than Lt. Col. Banastre Tarleton. Based partly on fact... The post Major James Wemyss: Second Most Hated British Officer in the South appeared first on Journal...

Continental Congress vs. Continental Army: Strategy and Personnel Decisions

When the American Revolution became a shooting war, it was left to the Continental Congress to become the body of state for the thirteen... The post Continental Congress vs. Continental Army: Strategy and Personnel Decisions appeared first on Journal...

Baron de Kalb’s Last Campaign

In 1777, Baron Johann de Kalb sailed to America from Bordeaux with the Marquis de Lafayette and a number of French officers who all expected to receive high ranking positions with the Continental Army. A veteran of many several European conflicts, the...

The 25 Deadliest Battles of the Revolutionary War

Name calling, fearing mongering and demonizing the enemy were all on the propaganda menu during the American Revolution. Once hostilities commenced, another game played a significant role in the war for mind control. A game of numbers. Simply inflating...

Unlucky or Inept? Gates at Camden

At the battle of Camden in August of 1780, Lord Cornwallis dealt the Americans under General Horatio Gates a shocking defeat.  Also known as the Hero of Saratoga, General Gates had recently proven a serious competitor to George Washington’s command...

Winner or Runner? Gates at Camden

Lord Cornwallis dealt General Horatio Gates a terrible defeat at Camden in South Carolina.  The battle represented a rather rude jolt to the reputation of the American general who had orchestrated the victory at Saratoga a few years earlier; to make...

Peter Francisco: Distinguishing Fact from Fiction

Engraving of Peter Francisco fighting the cavalry of Banastre Tarleton in Virginia, July 1781. Source: Library of Congress Dear Mr. History: I’ve heard that no private soldier did more to enable the rebel victory in the American Revolution than...

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.