The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Battles"

Showing 1 - 20 of 33

Your search for posts with tags containing Battles found 33 posts

The Court Martial of Major Henry Lee

Aside from Gen. Anthony Wayne’s successful assault upon a British garrison at Stony Point in July, military activity in the first eight months of... The post The Court Martial of Major Henry Lee appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“Four Battleflags of the Revolution: Captured by Lt.-Col. Banastre Tarleton”

On a late summer afternoon in 2005 representatives from Sotheby’s, the world’s most prestigious Fine Art auctioneers, pulled up outside the Hampshire home of... The post “Four Battleflags of the Revolution: Captured by Lt.-Col. Banastre...

The Battle between Bonhomme Richard and Serapis

Author’s note: Continental Navy midshipman Nathaniel Fanning’s eyewitness account of the American Revolution’s most famous naval battle is among the most detailed available. This... The post The Battle between Bonhomme Richard and Serapis...

Fiasco: The Disastrous Raid on Montresor’s Island

By the evening of September 30, 1776, George Washington was, as he put it, “bereft of every peaceful moment.” During the previous month, his... The post Fiasco: The Disastrous Raid on Montresor’s Island appeared first on Journal of the...

Commemoration of the four great naval victories…

Plates engraved by F. Bartolozzi, I. Landseer, J. Parker, Geo. Noble, Lenney, and W. Bromley after paintings by R. Smirke, miniatures by John Smart, and after portraits by Ryder, Stow, and Worthington. Title: Commemoration of the four great naval...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 3 Jan 2019

Bengal troops on the line of march : a panaoramic sketch

Plate 1 of 6 Printmaker: Ludlow, William Andrew. Title: Bengal troops on the line of march : a panaoramic sketch / by an officer of that army [i.e. Capt. Ludlow]. Published: [London] : Day and Haghe’s Zincy, [1850?] Catalog Record...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 3 Oct 2018

Sounding the Trumpet

I don’t often review books to which I’ve contributed, but this week, I’m going to make an exception and do a bit of trumpet blowing. During the last couple of weeks, the post has brought, inter alia, two complimentary copies of...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 13 Aug 2018

“the roads filld with frighted women & children”

HANNAH WINTHROP continued her letter to MERCY OTIS WARREN in May of 1775 describing the flight from Concord to a place of safety. She is saddened by the closure of Harvard and the disruption of education for its students. She fears for the library and...
From: In the Words of Women on 15 Apr 2018

“the horrors of that midnight Cry”

HANNAH WINTHROP continued her correspondence with MERCY OTIS WARREN, sharing news of the occupation of Boston by the British: “Loads of english goods…the fortifying of Boston neck, [and] the huge canon now mounted there,” that has led...
From: In the Words of Women on 9 Apr 2018

Recommendation: Two Articles of Interest

There are two articles in the Journal of the American Revolution that I would like to recommend. One is by Michael Sheehan who writes about Stony Point Battlefield and Lighthouse State Historic Site on the Hudson River where my friend Julia Warger is...
From: In the Words of Women on 25 Mar 2018

Washington’s Encampment at Verplanck 178

Having recently visited the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia and written about it in this post, I am tempted to return to see a special limited-run exhibit there from January 13 to February 19. On display will be a newly discovered seven-foot-long...
From: In the Words of Women on 5 Dec 2017

Swedish King's 'forgotten' 17th-century warship found in central Stockholm

Stefan Płużański's painting of the Battle of Oliwa in 1627, in which Scepter may have participated. Photo: Wikimedia Commons. https://www.thelocal.se/20170906/swedish-kings-scepter-shipwreck-17th-century-warship-found-in-central-stockholm
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 7 Sep 2017

Cannons and Concord

As a subscriber to J.L. Bell’s blog Boston 1775, and an admirer of his work, I am pleased to note that he has a book just out. Entitled The Road to Concord: How Four Stolen Cannon Ignited the Revolutionary War, it tells the story of four cannons...
From: In the Words of Women on 26 May 2016

“there is a God of Battle, as well as a God of peace”

As the year 1776 came to a close, MARGARET HILL MORRIS confessed to fluctuating emotions: pity for the soldiers of all sides and gratitude that her family had a roof over its head. On December 27, news was received about an action that took place on Christmas...
From: In the Words of Women on 28 Dec 2015

“Where sleeps the Virtue & Justice of the English Nation?”

This post is a repeat of one dated February 6, 2012 as it properly belongs in this extended examination of Esther DeBerdt Reed. In July, 1775, increasing danger as well as the poor health of her daughter Martha forced Esther to move in with a friend in...
From: In the Words of Women on 19 Oct 2015

“Nothing is heard now . . . but the trumpet and drum”

When I was a student at Barnard in the 50s, I had the opportunity of attending lectures at Columbia by Henry Steele Commager. I was thrilled because the two-volume work The Growth of the American Republic by Commager and Samuel Eliot Morison was my favorite...
From: In the Words of Women on 14 Sep 2015

The Wyoming Massacre

I was born and grew up in northeastern Pennsylvania, not far from Wilkes-Barre. My earliest impressions of the Wyoming Valley, bisected by the Susquehanna River, were physical. Of the anthracite or hard-coal fields in the area: a landscape dotted with...
From: In the Words of Women on 30 Jul 2015

“Rout that Impious Army”

MARY WHITE MORRIS wrote again from Aberdeen, Maryland (see previous posthref>), where she had fled with her children against the expected advance by the British on Philadelphia in the winter of 1776, to her husband Robert who had remained behind. December...
From: In the Words of Women on 4 Jun 2015

“a pair of brass Candle-sticks”

The Battle of White Plains, New York, occurred on October 28, 1776. General Washington was moving his troops northward from New York City into Westchester County after having suffered a major defeat by the British. It proved impossible to defend his position...
From: In the Words of Women on 4 May 2015

Most underrated battle?

Most underrated battle of the Revolutionary War? Why?   The most underrated battle of the war was Springfield, New Jersey, in 1780. If the Americans had lost, the war would have been virtually over. -Thomas Fleming   In the Battle of Pollilur on...

Page 1 of 212Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.