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Search Results for "Ben Jonson"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Ben Jonson found 49 posts

Isaac Hollandus

 J. Hollandus,Chymische Schriften, (Vienna: 1773)In early 1603, Glassmaker Antonio Neri traveled from Italy to Flanders, to visit his friend Emmanuel Ximenes. Neri would stay for seven years and in that time he worked on...
From: Conciatore on 11 Dec 2020

Isaac Hollandus

J. Hollandus,Chymische Schriften, (Vienna: 1773)In early 1603, Glassmaker Antonio Neri traveled from Italy to Flanders, to visit his friend Emmanuel Ximenes. Neri would stay for seven years and in that time he worked on a number...
From: Conciatore on 24 Jun 2020

Edward Reynolds, A Treatise of the Passions and Faculties of the Soul of Man (1656); Ben Jonson, The Works (1692)

One of the aims of Early Modern Female Book Ownership is to document women owners in the hope of discerning patterns of ownership, whether broader or localized to an individual. In Katherine Blount’s case, I had drafted a post in spring 2019 about...

Isaac Hollandus

J. Hollandus,Chymische Schriften, (Vienna: 1773)In early 1603, Glassmaker Antonio Neri traveled from Italy to Flanders, to visit his friend Emmanuel Ximenes. Neri would stay for seven years and in that time he worked on a number...
From: Conciatore on 7 Aug 2019

Isaac Hollandus

J. Hollandus,Chymische Schriften, (Vienna: 1773)In early 1603, Glassmaker Antonio Neri traveled from Italy to Flanders, to visit his friend Emmanuel Ximenes. Neri would stay for seven years and in that time he worked on a number...
From: Conciatore on 10 Dec 2018

Shakespeare, Drayton, and Pigeons

Shakespeare’s Death 402 years ago next Monday the Playwright William Shakespeare died – well he is thought to have died on the 23rd April 1616. Aged just 52, he had recently retired to his hometown of Stratford-upon-Avon in Warwickshire, where...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 18 Apr 2018

Isaac Hollandus

J. Hollandus,Chymische Schriften, (Vienna: 1773)In early 1603, Glassmaker Antonio Neri traveled from Italy to Flanders, to visit his friend Emmanuel Ximenes. Neri would stay for seven years and in that time he worked on a number...
From: Conciatore on 5 Feb 2018

Mary, Countess of Shrewsbury: poetry, patronage and power

This is, more or less, the text of the talk I gave earlier this month at the Wilton History Festival. Mary, Countess of Shrewsbury and the Pembroke family were the most influential patrons of the Elizabethan and Jacobean era. Let’s begin with a...
From: Mathew Lyons on 27 Sep 2017

Of God and Jonson: theatre history, new things and non-events

I was fortunate to be able to attend some of the superb Before Shakespeare conference at Roehampton last week. I came away with a range of thoughts and ideas, some of which I hope to pursue in one form or another. Perhaps the thing that struck me most,...
From: Mathew Lyons on 11 Sep 2017

CONFERENCE RESPONSE: Of God and Jonson: writing about new things and non-events by Mathew Lyons

I was fortunate to be able to attend some of the superb Before Shakespeare conference at Roehampton last week. I came away with a range of thoughts and ideas, some of which I hope to pursue in one form or another. Perhaps the thing that struck me most,...
From: Before Shakespeare on 4 Sep 2017

Isaac Hollandus

J. Hollandus,Chymische Schriften, (Vienna: 1773) In early 1603, Glassmaker Antonio Neri traveled from Italy to Flanders, to visit his friend Emmanuel Ximenes. Neri would stay for seven years and in that time he worked on a number...
From: Conciatore on 24 Mar 2017

Jonson in Sheffield: as it happened

Last weekend, Sheffield Centre for Early Modern Studies hosted a celebration of Ben Jonson and the 400th anniversary of his Workes. With more than a dozen people presenting, this was a full and thought-provoking symposium. Speakers reflected on Jonson’s...
From: SCEMS on 17 Nov 2016

Celebrating Ben Jonson’s First Folio

Ben Jonson As well as being the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, 1616 is also a significant date for anyone interested in the theatre and writing of the period. Between 6 and 25 November 1616 Ben Jonson’s Workes was published, a...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 10 Nov 2016

Performing Jonson – Sejanus

Finally, there was time to begin exploring the performance challenges and demands of Sejanus. The workshops were supported by a Culture and Communications Research Priming award from the University of York. Back: Watch the Volpone workshop....
From: Early Modern Theatre on 11 Oct 2016

Performing Jonson – Every Man In His Humour

In the second workshop, Henry Goodman and Professor Michael Cordner explored the performance challenges and demands of Every Man In His Humour, in which Henry played the role of Kitely in John Caird’s 1986 production with the Royal Shakespeare...
From: Early Modern Theatre on 11 Oct 2016

Performing Jonson – Volpone

In the first workshop,  Henry Goodman and Professor Michael Cordner explored the performance challenges and demands of  Volpone, which Henry played for the Royal Shakespeare Company in Trevor Nunn’s production at the Swan...
From: Early Modern Theatre on 11 Oct 2016

Performing Jonson for the 21st Century

In July we were joined by Olivier-award winning actor Henry Goodman to begin to explore performing Jonson’s First Folio. Goodman, who has played the titular role in Volpone and Kitely in Every Man in His Humour, worked with Mike Cordner on speeches...
From: Early Modern Theatre on 12 Sep 2016

CALL FOR PAPERS: The Cultural Influence of Lucy Harington Russell, Countess of Bedford

“Life of the Muses’ day, their morning star!” The Cultural Influence of Lucy Harington Russell, Countess of Bedford 11–12 August 2016, Lincoln College, OxfordPaper proposals are invited for a conference dedicated to the cultural...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 11 Aug 2016

The Alchemist (Ben Jonson; dir. Polly Findlay) RSC/Swan, Stratford-upon-Avon, August 2015

This will be short. You walk into the Swan. It might as well be the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse. There’s smoke in the air and lots of candles, and soon a bunch of people in Jacobean outfits will enter; there’s also a table laden with nicely antiqued...
From: dispositio on 2 Aug 2016

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By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.