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Search Results for "Benjamin Rush"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Benjamin Rush found 28 posts

The Yellow Fever Outbreak of 1793: Nine Observations and Lessons

“I often thought that the situation of a people in a bombarded city, was not much worse, and on some accounts not so bad;... The post The Yellow Fever Outbreak of 1793: Nine Observations and Lessons appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

John Morgan vs. William Shippen: The Battle that Defined the Continental Medical Department

John Morgan and William Shippen, Jr. stood shoulder to shoulder in the crowd outside of old Westminster Hall on September 22, 1761. They were... The post John Morgan vs. William Shippen: The Battle that Defined the Continental Medical Department appeared...

S.H.E.A.R. Comes to Cambridge, 18-21 July

On 18-21 July, the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic will have its annual meeting in Cambridge. S.H.E.A.R. was founded in 1977 as “an association of scholars dedicated to exploring events and meanings of United States history...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 May 2019

Resolutions Shared by Two Towns 300 Miles Apart

The year was 1773. On May 10, Parliament had passed the Tea Act allowed the East India Company to sell tea directly to the... The post Resolutions Shared by Two Towns 300 Miles Apart appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Speakers at 2019 Revolutionary War Conferences

Here are the line-ups of speakers and topics at two conferences on the Revolutionary War coming later this year.Though some of the speakers are academics and they’re presenting high-quality research, these aren’t academic gatherings. The focus...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Jan 2019

Rush: Revolution, Madness, and the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father

Stephen Fried, Rush: Revolution, Madness, and the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father (New York: Crown, 2018) BUY THIS BOOK FROM AMAZON When... The post Rush: Revolution, Madness, and the Visionary Doctor Who Became a Founding Father appeared...

General Thomas Conway: Cabal Conspirator or Career Climber?

“French Officers hate him” and “none of the English Officers . . . love him.”[1] The American Revolution produced the names of great individuals who... The post General Thomas Conway: Cabal Conspirator or Career Climber? appeared...

A Season of Talks at the David Library

Here’s the lineup of upcoming talks at the David Library of the American Revolution in Pennsylvania. That’s a striking venue with a loyal audience, and its offerings cover the entire war—note how many different people and events proved...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Sep 2018

Guest Post: Spencer McBride, Benjamin Rush and the Divine Right of Republics

[We are thrilled to have another guest post from Spencer McBride, a historian an editor with the Joseph Smith Papers Project. You can read Spencer’s previous two posts here and here. More importantly, you can order his hot-off-the-press book, Pulpit...
From: The Junto on 13 Jan 2017

Political Science in Fever-Stricken Philadelphia

H-Net just ran Jan Golinski’s review of Feverish Bodies, Enlightened Minds: Science and the Yellow Fever Controversy in the Early American Republic by Thomas A. Apel.As Golinski explains, no one in 1790s Philadelphia understood the cause of the...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Sep 2016

The Tale of Benjamin Harrison and Elbridge Gerry’s Signatures

In its description of the Continental Congress’s main signing of the Declaration of Independence on 2 Aug 1776, the Course of Human Events blog listed “a number of quotations from the signing for which we have no evidence.” Among them...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Aug 2016

Are Your People Getting Mad?

"Are your people getting mad?," George Washington asked Benjamin Lincoln when he heard the news of what was happening in New England in the autumn of 1786. "Many of them appear to be absolutely so," the Massachusetts general replied. Today's post explores...
From: The Junto on 6 Aug 2015

Christopher Ludwick and the Prisoners of War

Yesterday I spotlighted a new picture book called Gingerbread for Liberty!, about a baker named Christopher Ludwick and his activity during the Revolutionary War. Author Mara Rockliff’s main source for that book was Dr. Benjamin Rush’s friendly short...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Jan 2015

Behind Gingerbread for Liberty!

Gingerbread for Liberty!: How a German Baker Helped Win the American Revolution is a picture book due to be released next month. Author Mara Rockliff tells the story of the Philadelphia baker Christopher Ludwick, whom the Continental Congress appointed...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Jan 2015

John Hancock and the Bombarding of Boston

On 4 July 1812, the young Attorney General of the United States, Richard Rush, delivered an Independence Day oration to the House of Representatives. His main message was about how wise it was to go to war with Great Britain again. For that speech Rush...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Jan 2015

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.