The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Biography"

Showing 1 - 20 of 262

Your search for posts with tags containing Biography found 262 posts

Lady Washington - Martha 1731-18

1771-81 Lady Washington Attributed to Samuel Blyth (English, 1744-1795)As some of the British referred to her, Lady Washington - Martha Dandridge Custis Washington was born at Chestnut Grove in New Kent County, Virginia, June 2, 1731. Her father,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 31 Mar 2020

The Art of Cookery with "frugal elegance" by Hanna Glassie 1708-1779

Elizabeth Hickman (d.1784), CookThe first American edition of The Art of Cookery by Hannah Glasse was published in Alexandria, Virginia in 1805. The English edition of the cookbook had been available in the colonies for decades.  The book was popular...
From: 18th-century American Women on 27 Mar 2020

Slave Trader Muslim Ayuba Suleiman Diallo 1701-1773 - Stolen from Africa sent to Maryland to England & back to his wives & children in Africa

Portrait of Ayuba Suleiman Diallo, (1701-1773) by William Hoare (English artist, 1707-1792)  Ayuba Suleiman Diallo [Job Ben Solomon] (c.1701–1773), Muslim cleric & slave, was born about 1701 in Bundu, west Africa, the son of a prominent...
From: 18th-century American Women on 25 Mar 2020

18C American Women - Henrietta Johnston 1674-1729

1711 Henrietta Johnston (1674-1729) Henriette Charlotte de Chastaigner (Mrs Nathaniel Broughton) Early in the 18C, many of the portraits of Southern colonial gentle ladies were done by Henrietta Johnston (1675-1729). She was the first identified pastelist...
From: 18th-century American Women on 22 Mar 2020

Gamaliel Ratsey (d.1605): The Man whose Life Kick-started the “True Crime” Genre

By Stephen Basdeo Gamaliel Ratsey was born in Market Deeping, Lincolnshire, during the late sixteenth century.[1] Little is known of Ratsey’s early life; his father, Richard, and his wife had several children and provided them all with a good education,...

Claude Du Vall: The Ladies’ Highwayman

By Stephen Basdeo In 1671 the poet and satirist wrote an ode ‘To the Memory of the Most Renowned Du-Vall’.[1] It celebrated the bravery and heroism of an English highwaymen named Claude Du Vall (1643–70): And yet the brave Du-Vall, vvhose...

Biography - 1708 Husband Rules Children & Wife - Virginia - Ann Walker

.Ann Walker's Fight To Attend ChurchIn 1708, Ann Keith Walker (1637- a 1708) appeared before the all male Royal Governor and Council in Williamsburg, Virginia, in a continuing dispute between her and George Walker (c1640-1732), her husband, over...
From: 18th-century American Women on 8 Jan 2020

Benjamin Franklin's Sister Jane Franklin Mecom

.The New York Times Opinion Pages,Poor Jane’s Almanac By JILL LEPORE, Op-Ed ContributorPublished: April 23, 2011 Poor Jane's AlmanacTHE House Budget Committee chairman, Paul D. Ryan, a Republican from Wisconsin, announced his party’s new economic...
From: 18th-century American Women on 11 Dec 2019

Biography - Marylander Ann Teresa Mathews 1732-1800 Founder of the 1st US Roman Catholic Convent

.Marylander Ann Teresa Mathews (1732-1800), founder with Frances Dickinson (1755-1830), of the 1st Roman Catholic convent for women in the United States, was born in Charles County, one of 3 children of Joseph & Susannah (Craycroft) Mathews. Her father,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 7 Dec 2019

Biography - Sophia Wigington Hume (1702-1774) South Carolina Quaker Minister & Religious Writer

.Sophia Wigington Hume (1702-1774), Quaker minister & religious writer, was born in Charleston, SC., one of the children of Henry Wigington (Wiginton), a prosperous landowner & colony official, & Susanna (Bayley) Wigington. Henry Wigington...
From: 18th-century American Women on 5 Dec 2019

Biography - Writer, Preacher, & Mantua Maker Bethsheba Bowers 1672-1718

.Quaker author and preacher Bathsheba Bowers was born in 1672, in Massachusettes, and died at age 46 in 1718, in South Carolina. She was one of 12 children born to Benanuel Bowers and his wife Elizabeth Dunster.Her mother Elizabeth was a young orphan...
From: 18th-century American Women on 3 Dec 2019

Biography - Madame Montour c 1684-c 1752 Interpreter & Indian Agent for New York & Pennsylvania

.Madame Montour (c. 1684-c. 1752), interpreter & Indian agent for the colonies of New York & Pennsylvania, spent most of her life among the Indians & was presumably of French & Indian descent. She had an air of distinction that led contemporaries...
From: 18th-century American Women on 1 Dec 2019

Quaker Inventor Sybilla Righton Masters (died in 1720) & Patents for Women

.Sybilla Masters (d. Aug. 23, 1720), inventor, sometimes called Sybella, was the 2nd daughter & 2nd of 7 children of William & Sara Murrell Righton, Quakers, of Burlington in the colony of West New Jersey. William, the son of William...
From: 18th-century American Women on 29 Nov 2019

Biography - Georgia's Indian Leader Mary Musgrove c 1700-1763 & Her Unfortunate Choice of Husbands

Mary Musgrove (c 1700-1763), Indian leader in colonial Georgia, was the child of a Creek mother & an English trader. Originally named Coosaponakeesa, she was born at Coweta town, then on the Ocmulgee River but later moved to the Chattahoochee River....
From: 18th-century American Women on 27 Nov 2019

Biography - Leading Ladies in Early American Theater Troupes

.Actresses in the 18th-century were generally not regarded with the same respect that male actors were. The stage was not a woman's world, as it was said to be better suited for men. On one hand, women were looked down upon if they acted, as it was not...
From: 18th-century American Women on 25 Nov 2019

Biography - 1780 Revolutionary Women's Relief Effort of Esther De Berdt (1746-1780) (Mrs. Joseph Reed)

. Ester De Berdt (1746-1780) (Mrs. Joseph Reed) depicted in classical republican dress by Charles Willson Peale (1741-1827).Ester De Berdt Reed (1746-1780), leader of women’s relief work during the American Revolution, was born in London, England,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 23 Nov 2019

Biography - American Shaker Founder "Mother" Ann Lee 1736-1784

Shaker Village, Canterbury, New HampshireAnn Lee (1736-1784), founder of the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, commonly called Shakers in the United States, was born in Manchester, England, one of 8 children of John Lees,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 21 Nov 2019

Biography - Cherokee Leader Nancy Ward 1738-1822 of Tennessee

.Nancy Ward (c 1738-1822), Cherokee leader, was probably born at Chota, a Cherokee village on the Little Tennessee River near Fort Loudoun in Monroe County, Tennessee. Her father is said to have been a Delaware Indian who, following the custom in the...
From: 18th-century American Women on 19 Nov 2019

Philadelphia-born Quaker Minister Rebecca Jones 1739-1818

.Rebecca Jones (1739-1818), Quaker minister, was born in Philadelphia, the only daughter of William & Mary Jones. Her father, a sailor, died at sea when she was too young to remember him, leaving 2 children, Rebecca & an older brother. Her mother,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 17 Nov 2019

Charity worker Isabella Marshall Graham 1742-1814

.Isabella Marshall Graham, (1742-1814), teacher & early charitable worker, the daughter of John & Janet (Hamilton) Marshall, was born in Lanarkshire, Scotland, & grew up on an estate at Eldersley near Paisley. Her father, a landowner, raised...
From: 18th-century American Women on 16 Feb 2012

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.