The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Black Death"

Your search for posts with tags containing Black Death found 14 posts

The Protocols of Zion and the roots of a racist forgery

Down the centuries Jewish people have been blamed for everything from the Black Death to the Russian Revolution. But rarely has such race hate found more cogent expression than in The Protocols of the Elders of Zion. The Protocols purports to be the verbatim...
From: Mathew Lyons on 28 Oct 2021

Painting a Pandemic: Michiel Sweerts’s “Plague in Ancient City” (1652) | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. Michiel Sweerts, Plague in an Ancient City, 1652. Oil on canvas. Los Angeles County Museum of Art (Public Domain Reproduction Licensed under Wikimedia Commons) Michiel Sweerts (1618–64)...

Painting a Pandemic: Domenico Gargiulo’s “Plague at Naples” (1656)

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. Domenico Gargiulo, Largo Mercatello a Napoli durante la peste del 1656. Oil on canvas. Museo Nazionale di San Martino.(Public Domain Reproduction Licensed under Wikimedia Commons) It is...

Painting a Pandemic: Napoleon Visiting the Sick

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. He has published books and articles on various subjects including the history of crime, radicalism, and socialism. Antoine-Jean Gros, Bonaparte visitant les pestiférés de Jaffa. 1804....

Painting a Pandemic

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK Nicolas Poussin, The Plague at Ashdod, 1631. Oil on canvas. Paris, Louvre (Public Domain Reproduction licensed under Wikimedia Commons) Plagues have left their mark on popular culture:...

First Appearance of Bubonic Plague in History

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. Plague, or Yersinia pestis, has “plagued” humankind throughout history. Since at least the reign of Byzantine Emperor Justinian in the 500s—and likely for much longer before that—it...

Eat, Drink & Be Merry

For the most part, I’ve managed to avoid dwelling on the pandemic and I must admit that I haven’t been that affected by it either, apart from the radical reconfiguration of my work environment! My struggle is to improve my online communication...
From: streets of salem on 21 Jul 2020

How the Black Death reshaped Medieval England

Jane Whittle was approached by History Extra to take part in a podcast after the publication of her article by The Many-headed Monster You can listen to it on History Extra -The Black Death and social change and find further details with links to more...
From: Forms of Labour on 22 Apr 2020

Quarantines in Salem

I’m pretty familiar with the origins of the quarantine, having taught classes on or in the era of the Black Death for twenty years: quaranta (40) days that ships were required to anchor in the harbor off Venice before they could unload their...
From: streets of salem on 31 Mar 2020

Blood and Buboes – The Black Death in Classrooms

  By Joanna Tyler, The University of Western Australia Joanna Tyler teaching students how to apply special effects make-up during a ‘Black Death’ workshop.When most people think of a history classroom, they probably imagine something...
From: Histories of Emotion on 25 May 2018

Catching the plague

  Medical staff treating an Ebola victim The outbreak of Ebola in West Africa has been one of the most alarming continuing stories of 2014. Seven thousand people have died and the West has been accused of being slow to respond. It is heartening to...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 15 Dec 2014

Plague Movie

I recently had the chance to talk to sixth-graders about the Black Death. I really enjoyed translating scholarship on the plague into terms that middle-school students would both understand and enjoy. Some of it is easy—Gabriele de’ Mussis’s account...
From: Darin Hayton on 4 Feb 2014

Ordinary People and Serfdom in the High Middle Ages

How did ordinary people resist serfdom in 13th and 14th century England?In thirteenth and fourteenth century England, economic difficulties and social unrest could be seen to account for intensifying conditions of serfdom in villages. Although serfdom...
From: Conor Byrne on 23 Mar 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.