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Your search for posts with tags containing Blog posts found 174 posts

St. David’s Day Daffodils

1 March is St. David’s Day, Dydd Gŵyl Dewi Sant celebrating the patron saint of Wales, St. David, who was a bishop of Mynyw in the 6th century. As a part of this celebration social medial has been flooded with images of daffodils (Narcissus)...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 1 Mar 2021

Forget Leaving Room for Jesus: Fornication and Community Control in Transitional New England

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 23 Feb 2021

Gender Concealed: How to get a boy in the early modern era

Gender reveal parties, which started some time in the 2000s, have become increasingly elaborate and Instagram worthy. Some excessive stunts have even caused raging wildfires. When I was younger these parties weren’t around but I do remember old...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 10 Feb 2021

Learning to Walk

The baby walker is a device to support an infant who is not yet independently mobile to ‘walk’ around. In the past they were thought to aid the child’s development as she learned to walk. Images of the baby walker date back at least...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 12 Jan 2021

Weight loss Wonders

Fad diets are  perhaps a modern concept, but if we look back to the seventeenth century we can find some pretty interesting weight loss remedies. As we have seen previously some medical writers felt that the shape of your belly had a lot to say about...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 11 Sep 2013

Mad Dogs and Bindweed Cures.

As we start to see light at the end of this long Covid tunnel, thanks to the new vaccines on the horizon, we thought we’d bring you the story of a book about rabies, another disease in which vaccination has been effective. Like the new Covid vaccines,...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 9 Dec 2020

Black Mothers Matter: Social Media can Shift the Agenda for Black Maternal Health

On 25th May 2020 the murder of George Floyd, a 46-year-old Black American man, by police officer Derek Chauvin, sent social media into an uproar that reignited the Black Lives Matter Movement. The use of the global hashtag ‘#BLM’ was everywhere:...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 26 Oct 2020

It cost me a cold

Travelling and bathing In June 1645 John Evelyn travelled from Rome to Venice. The journey left him extremely weary and so he decided to visit the ‘Bagnias’ to take a bath. He described the experience as follows: [The bath] treat after the...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 7 Oct 2020

Maternal Impressions

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 28 Sep 2020

Women’s Writing Special Issue

Sara and I are editing a special issue of Women’s Writing! See the details here or head to the Women’s Writing website for more. Women’s Writing on Illness and Disease In light of the current Covid-19 pandemic, it seems timely to consider...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 4 Aug 2020

Drumming wombs & fanny farts: Listening to the widow’s belly in seventeenth-century Ireland.

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 25 Jun 2020

Making a Medical Commonwealth

Abigail Harley and Brampton Bryan: Making a Medical Commonwealth By Emma Marshall How were illness and healthcare entangled with power in the past? Abigail Harley (c.1664-1726) of Brampton Bryan, Herefordshire, was part of a famously political family....
From: Early Modern Medicine on 10 Jun 2020

Bloodletting and Pleurisy

Writing in his autobiography Sir Simonds D’Ewes explains that on the 22 February 1631 his father, Paul Dewes a barrister and government official, ‘fell sick of a fever, joined with a pleurisy, of which disease he lingered three weeks before...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 27 May 2020

Pear Power

Being stuck inside the house on lock-down is certainly very challenging, but it has meant that I have had ample time to enjoy my rather petite pear tree explode into blossom. Eating Fruit Eating fruit in the early modern period was complicated in terms...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 13 May 2020

Midwives and Gossips

Tuesday 5 May 2020 is International Day of the Midwife, which falls during the World Health Organisation’s Year of the Nurse and Midwife making it a double celebration. Midwifery and childbirth is something we’ve discussed a few times on this...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 5 May 2020

‘Trouble and Expense’: The Pregnant Woman and the Asylum

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 30 Apr 2020

Historic Hostility and the Search for a Smallpox Vaccine.

A guest post by Jo Willet As the Coronavirus crisis continues, seemingly daily we get news of the scramble to find a vaccine and ineffective antibody tests. Today we have a guest blog by Jo Willet pointing out the parallels between the search for a vaccine...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 27 Apr 2020

Living through lockdown: Julian of Norwich, TS Eliot and the life-shaped hole in our hearts

For those who don’t feel inclined to watch the film I made for A Bit Lit on life during lockdown, here’s a rough transcript. My name is Mathew Lyons, and I am a freelance writer and historian. In practice, that means I am lucky enough to mostly...
From: Mathew Lyons on 15 Apr 2020

Snail salves, waters, & syrups

In an old blog post about treating urinary conditions we included a remedy made of snail shells. Mary Fleetwood’s sunburn recipe also contained snail. Snails perhaps because they were easily accessible animal products, were a regular ingredient...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 15 Apr 2020

The life-shaped hole in our hearts: thoughts on living under lockdown

A couple of weeks ago I was invited to contribute a brief film to the A Bit Lit YouTube channel, created by Andy Kesson and others as a forum for thoughts on literature, history and culture during lockdown. So here I am, talking about freedom and confinement,...
From: Mathew Lyons on 14 Apr 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.