The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing Book History found 145 posts

Renaissance Science – VII

In the last post we looked at the European re-invention of moveable-type and the advent of the printed book, which played a highly significant role in the history of science in general and in Renaissance science in particular. I also emphasised the various...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 7 Apr 2021

Renaissance Science – VI

There is no doubt that the fifteenth and sixteenth century introduction of print technologies in Europe, making possible the advent of the printed book, was one of the most important developments in the history of not just Renaissance science, but the...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 24 Mar 2021

Renaissance Science – II

The so-called Scientific Renaissance at the beginning of the High Middle Ages was truly a renaissance in the sense of the rediscovery or re-emergence of the, predominantly Greek, intellectual culture of antiquity albeit, much of it in this case,...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 27 Jan 2021

The man who printed the world of plants

Abraham Ortelius (1527–1598) is justifiably famous for having produced the world’s first modern atlas, that is a bound, printed, uniform collection of maps, his Theatrum Orbis Terrarum. Ortelius was a wealthy businessman and paid for the publication...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 20 Jan 2021

The Readers called Methodists: A Review of Pulpit, Press, and Politics

Todd Webb Scott McLaren, Pulpit, Press, and Politics: Methodists and the Market for Books in Upper Canada (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2019) By the early 1860s, Methodism had become the largest Protestant denomination in the future provinces...
From: Borealia on 14 Sep 2020

VIDEO: Re-Reading Milton Re-Reading Shakespeare (SRS • June 30, 2020)

Yesterday, Jason Scott-Warren (Cambridge University) and I presented some updated findings about—and readings of—the marked up copy of Mr William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies (1623), aka the First Folio, housed in the Rare...

The Unquiet Hymnbook in the Early United States

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Christopher N. Phillips It’s not much to look at....
From: Age of Revolutions on 2 Mar 2020

Winter School: Archival Research Skills and Book History, 2-3rd December, University of Limerick

The Centre for Early Modern Studies, Limerick, presents the 2nd Winter School in Archival Research Skills & Book History 2nd – 3rd December 2019 Supported by the AHSS Teaching Board   Venue: University of Limerick, Glucksman Library...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 12 Nov 2019

Milton's Shakespeare: A Digest of Media Coverage

Suggested emendations to the text of ‘Romeo & Juliet’ in the Free Library of Philadelphia’s First Folio. [Reproduced with kind permission of the Free Library of Philadelphia’s Rare Book Department.] ...

With(out) Milton: Dating the Annotations in the Free Library of Philadelphia's First Folio

Detail of manuscript emendation and bracketing in the Free Library of Philadelphia’s copy of Mr William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies (1623). [Image reproduced with kind permission of the Free Library of Philadelphia.] ...

Archives Lost: The French Revolution and the Destruction of Medieval French Manuscripts

“Revolutionary Material Culture Series” This series examines the Age of Revolutions through its material markers, reminding us that materials themselves reflected and shaped political cultures around the revolutionary Atlantic and World. By...
From: Age of Revolutions on 29 Apr 2019

Henry Christophe Rebound: Juste Chanlatte’s Lost Play ‘Néhri’ and the Afterlife of the Kingdom of Haiti

“Revolutionary Material Culture Series” This series examines the Age of Revolutions through its material markers, reminding us that materials themselves reflected and shaped political cultures around the revolutionary Atlantic and World. By...
From: Age of Revolutions on 1 Apr 2019

Translating Cultures in Early Modern Europe – What’s Next?

Myriam-Isabelle Ducroq (Paris), Thomas Munck (Glasgow) and Gaby Mahlberg (Berlin) (from left). Sometimes a workshop is only a workshop, and sometimes it is the beginning of a whole new project. With the recent Translating Cultures event held at the Herzog...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 4 Aug 2018

Seminar paper – 14 June 2018, 5.30pm, Institute of Historical Research – The profit of bees and honey: beekeeping manuals on the cusp of scientific study, 1568-1657

On Thursday 14 June, I’ll be presenting for the first time a part of my early modern beekeeping research. This is at the Food History seminar, Institute of Historical Research, Senate House, University of London. The seminar is free and open to...
From: Sixteenth Century Scholars on 11 Jun 2018

"Depth of Field: New Dimensions in the Study of Early Modern Books" #mla19

The deep bite of type on the recto of the title page of The Trial of Chivalry (1605), STC 24935a, Folger Shakespeare Library. It has been a while since I have posted anything here, but my writing...

Translating Cultures – Workshop at the Duke August Library, 26/27 June

An eighteenth-century German edition of Algernon Sidney’s Discourses Concerning Government (1683) If you are an early modernist interested in translation, print and the book trade in Europe and you can make it to Wolfenbüttel this summer, drop...
From: The History Woman's Blog on 16 Mar 2018

Teaching English composition with early modern-style “commonplace books”

This fall, I have been trying out a number of strategies to integrate writing exercises, literary readings, and Special Collections visits in my undergraduate pedagogy. These experiments – that’s the word I prefer to use – allow the...
From: Vade Mecum on 20 Nov 2017

Inscriptions in the Galway Dominican convent library collection

In an earlier blog I discussed three seventeenth-century books from the Galway Dominican convent library collection which has recently been acquired by the James Hardiman Library. A substantial acquisition, consisting of over 150 books and volumes in...
From: RECIRC on 10 Aug 2017

Digital receptions of Esther Inglis

Esther Inglis (1570/71-1624) is now regarded as one of the finest calligraphers to have worked in England and Scotland during the early modern period. As Gillian Wright on the Perdita Project (2004) points out, Inglis may have learnt her calligraphic...
From: RECIRC on 23 Jun 2017

Four early modern books from the James Hardiman Library, NUI Galway – as seen at #recirc17

In the preceding post, Bronagh McShane discussed three early modern books from the Galway Dominican convent library, now preserved in the James Hardiman Library. This post discusses four additional books from the exhibition that we co-curated with Special...
From: RECIRC on 19 May 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.