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Your search for posts with tags containing Book Reviews found 462 posts

Book Review: ‘Margaret the First’ by Danielle Dutton

Margaret Lucas Cavendish, Duchess of Newcastle-upon-Tyne (1623–1673) was one of the most interesting women of the Stuart era. She was a philosopher, the author of The Blazing World, and was the first woman to attend a Royal Society meeting. No wonder...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 2 Oct 2022

Book Review: ‘Sex, Love & Marriage in the Elizabethan Age’ by R.E. Pritchard

‘Sex, Love & Marriage in the Elizabethan Age’, written by R.E. Pritchard, is a fascinating read, full of excerpts from primary source material from the Elizabethan period, it is well worth a read. Even though the title implies that the book is...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 30 Sep 2022

Book Review: ‘Hamnet’ by Maggie O’Farrell

Although set only a few years before the seventeenth century, Hamnet is well worth a review on this website. It has been an enormously successful novel and I was intrigued about it since I first heard about it. As many know, William Shakespeare (1564-1616)...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 24 Sep 2022

History of science is global history

The simple statement that the history of science is global history is for me and, I assume, for every reasonably well-informed historian of science a rather trivial truism. So, I feel that James Poskett and the publishers Viking are presenting something...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 17 Aug 2022

The sixteenth century dispute about higher order algebraic equations and their solution

The Early Modern period is full of disputes between scholars about questions of priority and accusations of the theft of intellectual property. One reason for this is that the modern concepts of copyright and patent rights simply didn’t exist then,...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 20 Jul 2022

Astrology, data, and statistics

Is western astrology a big data science, or even the very first big data science? Data scientist Alexander Boxer thinks it is and has written a book to back up his claim, A Scheme of Heaven: The History of Astrology and The Search for Our Destiny in...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 23 Jun 2022

Review: The Voyages and Manifesto of William Fergusson. Edited w/ introduction & notes by Derek L. Elliott (The Hakluyt Society, 2021)

by Lionel Knight Review forthcoming in The Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society Reposted with permission This volume will join more than forty travel accounts focused wholly or in part on South Asia which the Hakluyt Society has published over...
From: Richard who? on 9 Jun 2022

Around the World in One Thousand and Eighty-three Days 

Growing up in the UK in the 1950s, history lessons in primary school, that’s elementary school for Americans, still consisted to a large extent of a glorification of the rapidly fading British Empire. The classroom globes were still covered in swathes...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 25 May 2022

Illuminating the Middle Ages

It is probably true that no period in European history had been so misconceived, misconstrued, misrepresented, as the Middle Ages. Alone the fact that a period of history that is often considered to have lasted a thousand years from 500 to 1500 CE is...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 27 Apr 2022

A Cock is a Thing that Ticks

As I have mentioned a few times in the past, I came late to the computer and the Internet. No Sinclairs, Ataris, or Commadores in my life, my first computer was a Bondi Blue iMac G3. All of which is kind of ironic, because by the time I acquired that...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 30 Mar 2022

Book review: ‘My Queen, My Love’ by Elena Maria Vidal

This is the first novel I’ve read by E.M. Vidal, although I’ve known her on social media for several years now. With ‘My Queen, My Love’, the first in her trilogy of Henrietta Maria, E.M. Vidal has brought Henrietta Maria’s passion and character...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 18 Mar 2022

Chronology, history, or prophecy?

Bible chronology is a fascinating Early Modern intellectual phenomenon that combines science, history, and theology. Put simply, it is basically the attempt, assuming the Old Testament to be true and historically accurate, to develop the time frame of...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 2 Mar 2022

Occult studies towards a modern approach.

This review is very much a co-production with Dr Petra Schmidl, an expert on Islamicate occult studies, and she is in fact the lead author The last couple of decades has seen a steady increase in both the volume and the quality of the studies of the...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 2 Feb 2022

Book Review: Wentworth Woodhouse: The House, the Estate and the Family

Happy New Year, gentle readers! Published in May 2021 by Pen & Sword History, Wentworth Woodhouse: The House, The Estate, & The Family by Melvyn Jones, Joan Jones, and Stephen Cooper, is a readable and well-researched overview of the history of...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 29 Jan 2022

A new book on Vauxhall Gardens!

If you have loved Bridgerton, Vanity Fair, Sanditon and the many other books and TV series to feature a twirl around Vauxhall Gardens you will welcome this new volume of essays by David E. Coke, a leading expert in London’s pleasure gardens of the 18th...
From: Naomi Clifford on 6 Jan 2022

Review: DOWN A DARK RIVER by Karen Odden

Any novel that quoted Victorian poet Matthew Arnold's "Dover Beach" would be a favorite of mine, but when one of the victims in Karen Odden's just-released mystery DOWN A DARK RIVER (Crooked Lane) offers the poet's famous admonition--"Ah, love, let us...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 15 Nov 2021

Would you like a new body for that brain, sir?

Brain transplants are the subject of science fiction and Gothic horror, right? One of the most famous Gothic horror stories, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus features a brain transplant, of which much is made in the various...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 10 Nov 2021

Putting women back into the history of science

Readers who have been around here for a long time will know that for several years I was editor in chief of On Giants’ Shoulders the monthly history of science blog carnival. They will also know that I buried it when its time had come and replaced...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 13 Oct 2021

Not just an elder sister

How do you write a biography of an intellectual woman, who was a major, significant figure in the scientific, social, and political circles of her time, but who, although she wrote extensively, published almost nothing and whose personal papers were scattered...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 13 Oct 2021

Book Review: ‘The Guardian’ by Maeve Greyson

Sometimes we need a bit of escapism and, for me, that sometimes means a romance—and this book totally fit the bill. I have to be honest, I wasn’t really interested in the beginning, but that might just be down to me not being in the right frame of...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 29 Aug 2021

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