The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Books & Film"

Your search for posts with tags containing Books & Film found 19 posts

An Interview of Susanne Dunlap, author of THE SPIRIT OF FIRE

Susanne Dunlap has just released THE SPIRIT OF FIRE, the second installment (already!) of her acclaimed ORPHANS OF TOLOSA trilogy, set during the 13th century during the crusade against the Cathar heresy, in a place that would soon become part of France....
From: Versailles and More on 24 Dec 2019

THE GHOST OF MADISON AVENUE, by Nancy Bilyeau

I love Nancy Bilyeau’s novels and needed a fast read to distract me from thoughts that had been weighing me down during this Advent season. So, I purchased THE GHOST OF MADISON AVENUE. A fast read it was (it’s a novella) but one that...
From: Versailles and More on 18 Dec 2019

Late Summer on Brook’s heath

By Sara Marie Westh Copyright: Peter Brook (1971) The images from Peter Brook’s cinematic version of King Lear have been burned onto the retinas of countless Shakespeareans since its release in 1971. The stark landscape of the movie shows a...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 28 Aug 2018

Author in conversation: Ian Doescher on William Shakespeare’s The Force Doth Awaken (Star Wars Part the Seventh) 25/10/2017, Shakespeare Centre, Stratford-upon-Avon [spoiler alerts]

By Dr Thea Buckley To begin with, Ian Doescher explained the origins of his series, long ago, in a country far away: “I pitched it to Quirk Books right after going to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and re-watching the original Star Wars trilogy....
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 20 Mar 2018

Shakespeare for Freedom: Why the Plays Matter

Kiernan Ryan and Ewan Fernie in  conversation. We are happy to share CUP’s recording of Ewan Fernie’s and Kiernan Ryan’s conversation on Shakespeare for Freedom. CUP states that: Shakespeare for Freedom presents a powerful,...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 27 Nov 2017

Monologues not by Shakespeare

Monologues not by Shakespeare. Tr. Marlous Lange Peters. Amsterdam: Uitgeverij International Theatre and Film Books, with Het Vijfde Bedrijf, 2016.Review by Paul Franssen (Utrecht University) As the title suggests, this book contains a collection of...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 6 Jun 2017

Henry E. Huntington, the Greatest Book Collector

In “Why America buys England’s books,” a 1927 article in the Atlantic Monthly, Philadelphia bookseller Rosenbach wrote that Henry E. Huntington was the “greatest collector of books the world has ever known.” The London Times...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 28 Mar 2017

Illustrating Shakespeare: A History of Roman Representations in Printed Texts

By Ella Hawkins, SBT Research Advocate Ella Hawkins is currently completing a Midlands3Cities-funded placement with the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust as part of her PhD studies in design for Shakespeare. In the coming weeks, Ella will be publishing...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 7 Mar 2017

Where did the idea of this adaptation come from?

By Germana Maciocci Shakespeare has been part of my story since I was very small. Reading and studying his plays and going to theaters to watch them coming to life before my eyes, at different periods of my life, and the endless considerations and...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 20 Jan 2017

Jonathan Strange and the Friends of English Verse Drama

 ‘This other magic, it will not do, sir.’ – Gilbert Norrell ‘But Shakespear’s Magick could not copy’d be, Within that Circle none durst walk but he.’ – John Dryden It’s entirely possible that...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 16 Jun 2015

Sidney Lee, Henry Folger, and the First Folio

Sidney Lee né Solomon Lazarus Lee in London in 1859 was a biographer and Shakespearean scholar. He edited the Dictionary of National Biography to which he contributed over 800 articles. He wrote a biography of Shakespeare in 1898. We Americans remember...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 25 Feb 2015

An interview of Nancy Bilyeau, author of THE CHALICE

As I read THE CHALICE, my friend Nancy Bilyeau’s new novel in the Joanna Stafford series, I found that I couldn’t put it down until I was done with it. Nancy kindly agreed to answer a few questions for the readers of Versailles and More.   The...
From: Versailles and More on 17 Jun 2014

The Berkeley Square Affair, by Teresa Grant

the berkeley square affair Today it is my pleasure to welcome as a guest blogger my friend and fellow author Teresa Grant, whose new novel, The Berkeley Square Affair, was released yesterday. Congratulations, Teresa, and welcome to Versailles and More! ====================================== After...
From: Versailles and More on 26 Mar 2014

Worlds Elsewhere

Image AlanBetts.comI am pleased to post the following on behalf of Andrew Dickson, a journalist at the Guardian and a Fellow of our exciting new project (with University of Warwick) Shakespeare on the Road: “A few years back, when I was just about...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 30 Jan 2014

Fernie’s Freetown Film!

Professor Ewan Fernie, University of BirminghamFollowing on from the recent account of Ewan Fernie’s inaugural lecture, you might like to know that you can watch a recording of it made available by the University of Birmingham by clicking here....
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 30 Jan 2014

Macdepp

Romeo played by Johnny Depp. Now that I would have liked to see. He has, to be sure, scrupulously avoided playing the gorgeous romantic leads that his looks would have made possible, but in his lost vulnerable Gilbert Grape and Sam (of Benny and Joon)...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 7 Oct 2013

Keeping up with Shakespeare

When I started blogging on Shakespeare Calling a couple of years ago I had some kind of vague ambition – alongside of reading the plays and writing short responses to them – of seeing all the movies based on the plays, going to the theater to see...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 30 Sep 2013

Swedish Shakespeare Society Course London 2013

It wasn’t what I expected, which was lectures by some British Shakespeare enthusiasts, scholarly analysis of Shakespeare’s most difficult play The Taming of the Shrew, and heated discussions of how to interpret Katherine’s last monologue. Sadly,...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 18 Jul 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.