The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Boston"

Showing 1 - 20 of 698

Your search for posts with tags containing Boston found 698 posts

Smoking the Smallpox Sufferers

At about midnight on September 29, 1792, Ashley Bowen and his young assistant, Tucker Huy, heard a carriage clatter up the Boston Road and... The post Smoking the Smallpox Sufferers appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Fear of Domination: Resistance Against Tyranny

The threat of continued oppression and an encroaching condition of slavery was central to the American colonists’ call for separation from Great Britain and... The post The Fear of Domination: Resistance Against Tyranny appeared first on Journal...

January 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The whole taken from the Boston Chronicle, in which they were first published.” Newspaper printers participated in networks of exchange in eighteenth-century America,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Jan 2020

January 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Imported from LONDON (before the Non-Importation Agreement took Place).” Cyrus Baldwin hoped for prosperity in the new year, greeting 1770 with an invitation for prospective...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 1 Jan 2020

December 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Induce those Gentlemen who have long been Customers, to renew their Subscription.” Richard Draper, printer of the Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News-Letter,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Dec 2019

Aphra Behn, The Counterfeit Bridegroom (1677)

We have only showcased a few books on this website so far that were both owned and written by a woman, and as we have seen in the case of Hannah Woolley, attribution can be problematic. Here is another instance of problematic attribution: a play that...

EXTRA: Radio Interviews This Week

I’m scheduled to do two radio interviews this week.In the hour after midnight on Tuesday morning, I’ll speak to Bradley Jay at WBZ, Boston’s 1030 AM. Our topic will be Henry Knox’s expedition to the Lake Champlain fortifications...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Dec 2019

When Balch Came Back

In early October 1775, Nathaniel Balch the hatter left London and sailed back home to America.On 23 December, the Providence Gazette reported on news from the preceding days:Captain Gorham is arrived at Nantucket from London, after a Passage of eleven...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Dec 2019

December 28

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Advertisement in Reply to Mr. Samuel Anthony’s, inserted in the first Page of this Paper.” It began as an advertisement concerning “a Negro Man named Cuffe,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Dec 2019

The Voyage of Nathaniel Balch

Earlier this year I introduced the figure of Nathaniel Balch, a hatter who was prominent in Boston society before and after the Revolutionary War. Balch was close to Revolutionary leaders, particularly John Hancock. In August 1769, Balch entertained at...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Dec 2019

Split Scene Christmas

For the past couple of years, our family has split our Christmas holiday between Boston and Salem: we all want to be home for the holidays but also at the Copley Plaza! My husband and I started a Christmas Eve tradition at the Oak Room tradition a few...
From: streets of salem on 26 Dec 2019

December 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Many Years experience in the most eminent Shops in London.” As 1769 drew to a close, the residents of Boston and many other cities and towns throughout the colonies...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Dec 2019

“I keept Christmas at home this year”

Young Anna Green Winslow, whose parents lived in Nova Scotia, was being schooled in Boston and living with her aunt. In these excerpts she describes the weather on Christmas Eve 1771, how she spent Christmas itself, as well as January 1. Decr 24th.—...
From: In the Words of Women on 24 Dec 2019

Amos Lincoln and His Prayerful Master

When Amos Lincoln died in 1829, the Columbian Centinel newspaper described him as “one of the intrepid band who consigned the Tea to the ocean, in 1773.” But it took another couple of decades before details of Lincoln’s story got into...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Dec 2019

Amos Lincoln at the Tea Party

Back in 2006, I posted the first list of men who participated in the Boston Tea Party, published at the back of Traits of the Tea Party in 1835, followed by my best guess about who came up with that list. I posited that those names came from Benjamin...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Dec 2019

Joseph Lovering Out Late

Francis S. Drake’s Tea Leaves (1884) is our source for Joseph M. Lovering’s tale of the Boston Tea Party—as passed on by admiring neighbors. Lovering was born in 1758, so he was still in his early teens in 1773. He lived near the corner...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Dec 2019

December 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Will engage to make any Piece of Work as compleat as can be imported.” In December 1769, Daniel MacNeill, a “Saddler and Cap-maker from DUBLIN,” turned...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Dec 2019

John Crane “knocked down by a chest of tea”

The story of John Crane at the Boston Tea Party comes to us through the Drake brothers.Samuel Adams Drake (1833-1905) and Francis S. Drake (1828-1885, shown here) were sons of a Boston antiquarian, and they followed his path in writing multiple books...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Dec 2019

December 17

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The lowest Price of Lemmons.”   John Crosby’s advertisements were a familiar sight for readers of the Massachusetts Gazette and Boston Weekly News-Letter...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Dec 2019

John Crane at the Tea Party

As shown yesterday, the Boston Whigs played down the crowd violence against Richard Clarke and other tea consignees in early November 1773. That effort became easier when those merchants decided it was safer to be out of town, either in the countryside...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Dec 2019

Page 1 of 35123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.