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Search Results for "Boston Tea Party"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Boston Tea Party found 121 posts

The Aftermath of the Second Boston Tea Party

Yesterday I discussed the political effect of the second Boston Tea Party in London. Today I’ll wrap up this topic with a look at the ripples from the event in Massachusetts. Five local men were linked to the shipment of tea on the Fortune. All...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Mar 2021

“What natural right, whether that of smuggling, or of throwing tea overboard?”

The second Boston Tea Party on 7 March 1774 made a smaller splash than the first on the preceding 16 December.There was much less tea involved—fewer than thirty chests as opposed to more than three hundred.The tea was much less valuable. It was...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Mar 2021

“Whereas Tea is an Indian Plant…”

Yesterday I quoted a couple of press reports and a diary entry showing how Bostonians used the trope of “Indians” to discuss the men who dumped tea in the harbor, both in December 1773 and March 1774.Another document of that sort was printed...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Mar 2021

“King of the Narragansett tribe of Indians”?

The second Boston Tea Party cemented the “Indian disguises” aspect of the events. On the morning after the Fortune arrived in Boston harbor, the report in Edes and Gill’s radical Boston Gazette ended by saying: The SACHEMS must have...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Mar 2021

Tales of the Second Boston Tea Party?

Boston’s first tea crisis lasted two months. The town heard about East India Company tea coming to certain merchants by 18 October, when the Boston Gazette published the news. The men and boys who destroyed that tea headed home late at night on...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Mar 2021

“Emptied and threw the Tea into the Water”

On Sunday, 6 Mar 1774, as described yesterday, the brig Fortune carried 28 1/2 chests of tea into Boston harbor, along with “Gun-Powder, Duck and Hemp.” “The next day,” Gov. Thomas Hutchinson wrote, “the vessel was haled...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Mar 2021

“Chests of Bohea tea consigned to several persons”

At three o’clock in the afternoon of Sunday, 6 Mar 1774, Bostonians were jolted by the arrival of the brig Fortune.More specifically, people were jolted by the news that that ship was carrying chests of tea. This was about ten weeks after the Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Mar 2021

Ripples from the Boston Tea Party in 1774

Without the Boston Massacre reenactment looming over my schedule this year, I’ll devote the next few days to the events of early March 1774. That was less than three months after the Boston Tea Party, and the ripples from that big splash in the...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Mar 2021

Some Say the Tea Will End in Fire

Today’s the 247th anniversary of the Boston Tea Party, which is impressive, though not quite at Sestercentennial level.Earlier this month a student working on a History Day project asked me why the Sons of Liberty tossed the East India Company tea...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Dec 2020

Historic Holiday Presentations

Lots of local historical organizations are offering special online events to make staying healthy at home this season more interesting. Here’s a selection that caught my eye.Sunday, 6 December, 5:00 P.M.Virtual Traditions of the SeasonPaul Revere...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Dec 2020

A Painter Abroad: John Singleton Copley Writes to His Wife

It may have been Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s patriotic paean that belatedly canonized a heroic horseman as a key figure of the American Revolution, but... The post A Painter Abroad: John Singleton Copley Writes to His Wife appeared first on Journal...

Tea in 18th Century America

Tea in 18th Century America by Kimberly K. Walters. (K. Walters at the Sign of the Gray Horse, 2019) Best-selling author Lucinda Brant offers enthusiastic... The post Tea in 18th Century America appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Amos Lincoln and His Prayerful Master

When Amos Lincoln died in 1829, the Columbian Centinel newspaper described him as “one of the intrepid band who consigned the Tea to the ocean, in 1773.” But it took another couple of decades before details of Lincoln’s story got into...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Dec 2019

Amos Lincoln at the Tea Party

Back in 2006, I posted the first list of men who participated in the Boston Tea Party, published at the back of Traits of the Tea Party in 1835, followed by my best guess about who came up with that list. I posited that those names came from Benjamin...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Dec 2019

Joseph Lovering Out Late

Francis S. Drake’s Tea Leaves (1884) is our source for Joseph M. Lovering’s tale of the Boston Tea Party—as passed on by admiring neighbors. Lovering was born in 1758, so he was still in his early teens in 1773. He lived near the corner...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Dec 2019

John Crane “knocked down by a chest of tea”

The story of John Crane at the Boston Tea Party comes to us through the Drake brothers.Samuel Adams Drake (1833-1905) and Francis S. Drake (1828-1885, shown here) were sons of a Boston antiquarian, and they followed his path in writing multiple books...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Dec 2019

John Crane at the Tea Party

As shown yesterday, the Boston Whigs played down the crowd violence against Richard Clarke and other tea consignees in early November 1773. That effort became easier when those merchants decided it was safer to be out of town, either in the countryside...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Dec 2019

Turkey Figs

I was researching the major tea importers and purveyors in Salem in light of the upcoming anniversary of the Boston Tea Party, but another commodity kept popping up in the sources: turkey figs. I didn’t look at any customs records, but...
From: streets of salem on 14 Dec 2019

December Events in Boston

Last week’s analysis of the Boston Tea Party leads us to the annual reenactment of that event and another event coming up in Boston this December. Saturday & Sunday, 7-8 December, noon to 4:00 P.M.Meet the Makers: A Colonial Craft FairePaul...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Nov 2019

Inspecting the Tea Party House

In the 1890s the old Bradlee house at the corner of Hollis and Tremont Streets became known as the “Tea Party House.” Until it was leveled in 1898, it was on lists of what tourists should see in Boston. Even after that, people sold souvenir...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Nov 2019

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