The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "British Empire"

Showing 1 - 20 of 68

Your search for posts with tags containing British Empire found 68 posts

The Age of Revolutions and the Impeachment of President Trump: A Post-Mortem

By Malick W. Ghachem The impeachment process just concluded in Washington made remarkable use of the eighteenth century as a source of political and legal authority. Progressive law professors confidently proclaimed an emphatically originalist approach...
From: Age of Revolutions on 13 Feb 2020

George Orwell’s Time as a Policeman in British India

By Angelo Calfo George Orwell’s ‘Shooting an Elephant’, first published in New Writing in 1936, is a recollection in first person of an experience that George Orwell had while serving as a policemanin Burma, British India (present day...

Revolution and Counterrevolution Among the Methodists in Early Nineteenth Century British North America

This post is a part of our “Faith in Revolution” series, which explores the ways that religious ideologies and communities shaped the revolutionary era. Check out the entire series. By Todd Webb By the time the American Revolution ended in...
From: Age of Revolutions on 13 Jan 2020

The Real-Life Aeronauts

By Jason Pearl Flight was invented not by the Wright brothers in the early twentieth century but by the Montgolfiers, also brothers, in the late eighteenth. Over a hundred years of ballooning—for show, for fun, for war, for science—precede...
From: Age of Revolutions on 23 Dec 2019

Across Borders: The Canadian Rebellion and Jacksonian America

By Maxime Dagenais A few weeks ago, a book that my good friend Julien Mauduit and I have been working on for years, Revolutions Across Borders: Jacksonian America and the Canadian Rebellion, was published with McGill-Queen’s University Press (MQUP)....
From: Age of Revolutions on 22 Jul 2019

Anon. ‘Robin Hood’ (1828)

The following poem, written anonymously and titled simply as ‘Robin Hood’, appeared in The Oriental Observer and Literary Chronicle in 1828. The newspaper, printed in Calcutta during the rule of the East India Company, went through a number...

Jack Harkaway: The Victorian Harry Potter

By Stephen Basdeo The Victorians in many ways were just like us: they enjoyed a good scandal whenever it was reported in the press, they liked both trashy and high-brow entertainment, and like today, they had their popular heroes adored by both adults...

The Crime of Sati

By Stephen Basdeo Britain and India have a long and interconnected history. Queen Elizabeth I was by no means an imperialist monarch, but her one major contribution to the rise of the British Empire was the granting of a Royal Charter to the Governor...

Prickly Presbyterianism? A Review of Boundless Dominion: Providence, Politics, and the Early Canadian Presbyterian Worldview

Todd Webb  Denis McKim, Boundless Dominion: Providence, Politics, and the Early Canadian Presbyterian Worldview (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2017). Writing about Wesleyan Methodism in Canada, or most anywhere else...
From: Borealia on 4 Feb 2019

“A hot dinner and a bloody supper”: St. Helena’s Christmas Rebellions of 1783 and 1811

By Felix Schürmann Did news of revolutions in the Atlantic world spark revolts on a South Atlantic island in 1783 and 1811, or did a combination of alcohol and Christmas festivities drive soldiers to rebellion? During the Age of Revolutions, the...
From: Age of Revolutions on 17 Dec 2018

Cabotia and Fredonia

Amanda Murphyao [This is the ninth essay of the Borealia series on Cartography and Empire–on the many ways maps were employed in the contested imperial spaces of early modern North America.] In his 1814 “Map of Cabotia,”...
From: Borealia on 28 Nov 2018

Colonizing St. John Island: A History in Maps

S. Max Edelson This essay examines the Board of Trade’s survey and plan for St. John Island (renamed Prince Edward in 1798). It is part of a larger study of British surveying and colonization in the maritime northeast, which is the focus of chapter...
From: Borealia on 14 Nov 2018

Free Communities of Color in the Revolutionary Caribbean

By Robert D. Taber and Charlton W. Yingling The tumult of the Age of Atlantic Revolutions provided new opportunities for people of color in the Caribbean, and recent scholarship has emphasized remarkable individuals who pursued their freedom and respectability...
From: Age of Revolutions on 22 Oct 2018

Recovering Refugees from 1794 Toulouse to Today

ByJoshua Meeks One of the seemingly inevitable outcomes of any revolutionary period is the creation of refugees. We are reminded of this daily with news of the ongoing refugee crisis in the Mediterranean, as thousands of persecuted or forgotten migrants...
From: Age of Revolutions on 2 Jul 2018

Perpetual Motion: Fantasies of Technology, Slavery, and History

Once we stop thinking of the past as a failed but noble attempt at the present, many of its inexplicable, repulsive, or ridiculous aspects take on a new colour. A good example is alchemical transmutation, an evident impossibility that nevertheless occupied...
From: memorious on 24 Jun 2018

Q&A with Daniel Livesay, author of Children of Uncertain Fortune: Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833

Daniel Livesay is Associate Professor of History at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, CA.  His research focuses on questions of race, slavery, and family in the colonial Atlantic World. His first book, Children of Uncertain Fortune:...
From: The Junto on 20 Apr 2018

New Brunswick Lighthouses and Colonial Spaces, 1784-1867

Zachary A. Tingley Lighthouses, once a lifesaving beacon of hope for mariners facing the elements, are themselves now in need of rescue. In communities up and down the Atlantic coast, local communities have organized to preserve lighthouses that, while...
From: Borealia on 19 Mar 2018

Crispus Attucks: American Revolutionary Hero?

This post is a part of the “Race and Revolution” Series. By Mitch Kachun Crispus Attucks is a name that twenty-first century American schoolchildren usually learn in their introduction to the American Revolution and its heroes. Attucks—a...
From: Age of Revolutions on 5 Mar 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.