The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "British Empire"

Showing 1 - 20 of 93

Your search for posts with tags containing British Empire found 93 posts

The Quebec Act, Two Fights, and Relative Subjecthood

Mark R. Anderson The king’s face had been “smeared with tar, with a necklace of potatoes around the neck from which was suspended a wooden Cross with this inscription— VOILÁ LE PAPE DU CANADA ET LE SOT ANGLOIS [This is the Pope of Canada and the...
From: Borealia on 20 Jun 2022

“What would Lord Durham advise?”

E.A. Heaman No, “not assimilate your French”: I think he’s been misread. Lord Durham would have better advice than that because he lived in a world not unlike our own. Devastating and state-discrediting pandemic? Check. Disaffected fringe looking...
From: Borealia on 15 Feb 2022

The Irish Charter Schools and the Long History of Residential Schooling in the British Empire

Peter William Walker Earlier this year, activists in Canada toppled statues of Queen Victoria and Queen Elizabeth II amid nationwide protests at the Canadian residential school system. In Canada, much of the conversation surrounding the residential schools...
From: Borealia on 15 Nov 2021

Teaching the American Revolution in the United Kingdom

Teaching the American Revolution in the United Kingdom comes with baggage. But British students respond to it ways that an American might not expect.... The post Teaching the American Revolution in the United Kingdom appeared first on Journal of the American...

Mary Wollstonecraft and the Question of French Character

This piece is a part of our ongoing series, entitled “Rethinking the Revolutionary Canon.” By Megan Gallagher In his masterwork of comparative political thought, The Spirit of the Laws (1748), Montesquieu had observed that “if there were...
From: Age of Revolutions on 18 Oct 2021

John Beaumont’s Boudicca (1647) | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a historian and writer based in Leeds, UK. This post is adapted from recent research conducted into early modern cultural portrayals of British imperialism. Introduction British popular culture’s relationship with imperialism...

A Lay from the Trenches: A Poem of the Crimean War (1855) | P. J. Questel

‘A Lay from the Trenches’ was a poem, written in 1855, by a soldier serving in the Crimean War. It was first published in the London Journal and has been transcribed by Stephen Basdeo.[1] We have the vigour yet, That nerv’d our sires of yore:...

Victorian Killer Snakes | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK. The British Empire (Stephen Basdeo Personal Collection) Introduction During the days of the British Empire, colonial officers and civil servants enjoyed hunting wild animals: tigers,...

Join, or Die: Why Did It Have to Be Snakes?

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By J....
From: Age of Revolutions on 5 Jul 2021

George W.M. Reynolds’s Exposure of Army Brutality | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK, and in this post he examines G.W.M. Reynolds’s novel The Soldier’s Wife (1852-53). First issue of G.W.M. Reynolds’s The Soldier’s Wife (personal collection) The radical novelist...

Brave Canadians! (1839) | S.R.G.

This song was originally written by someone known only by their initials “S.R.G.” and was included Hugh Williams’s National Songs and Poetical Pieces (1838), a radical, pro-Chartist poetry collection. The song itself is written in commemoration...

Red Meat for Empire: New England Cattle, the British Empire, and the Disruption of Revolution

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By Strother...
From: Age of Revolutions on 24 May 2021

Entangling the Quebec Act: Transnational Contexts, Meanings, and Legacies in North America and the British Empire – A Review

Ollivier Hubert and François Furstenberg, eds., Entangling the Quebec Act: Transnational Contexts, Meanings, and Legacies in North America and the British Empire (Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2020). Adam Nadeau...
From: Borealia on 10 May 2021

The British Constitution in Crisis: The Gordon Riots and the American Revolution

By Lauren Michalak In the first week of June 1780, London was nearly brought to its knees by a week-long riot. Rioters destroyed all but one prison, attacked the properties and bodies of judges and politicians, and attempted to sack the Bank of England....
From: Age of Revolutions on 3 May 2021

Review of Resisting Independence: Popular Loyalism in the Revolutionary British Atlantic by Brad A. Jones (2020)

Review by Kacy Dowd Tillman Jones, Brad A. Resisting Independence: Popular Loyalism in the Revolutionary British Atlantic. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2020. 324 pp. Resisting Independence by Brad A. Jones explores loyalism as it played...
From: Age of Revolutions on 28 Apr 2021

Transnational News and the Irish Free Trade Crisis of 1779

By Joel Herman The gravitational pull of the American Revolution has been given new focus by the transnational turn, as scholars have begun to uncover the influence of the revolution elsewhere in the world.[1] One place where the American revolutionary...
From: Age of Revolutions on 8 Feb 2021

Interview: Ruma Chopra on “Almost Home: Maroons between Slavery and Freedom in Jamaica, Nova Scotia, and Sierra Leone”

Ruma Chopra’s recent book is Almost Home: Maroons between Slavery and Freedom in Jamaica, Nova Scotia, and Sierra Leone (Yale University Press, 2018). This interview was conducted by Roberto Sirvent, and was originally published at the Black Agenda...
From: Borealia on 20 Jan 2021

Land Grants, Religious Exemptions, and Aid on the Ground: The Role of Local Government in the Resettlement of Loyalist Refugees after the American Revolution

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Alexandra Mairs-Kessler                        ...
From: Age of Revolutions on 14 Jan 2021

“That great Sacrifice was made, through sad Necessity”: Charles Willson Peale’s William Pitt and the Emblemology of Tyrannicide

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By J. Patrick Mullins In the summer of 1768,...
From: Age of Revolutions on 11 Jan 2021

A philosopher queen remembered

Ahilyabai Holkar, queen of the Malwa kingdom in north-west central India, part of the Maratha empire, died on 13 August 1795, having reigned for nearly thirty years. She came to power in 1767 after the deaths of her father in law, Malhar Rao Holkar, and...
From: Mathew Lyons on 16 Nov 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.