The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "British Library"

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Your search for posts with tags containing British Library found 98 posts

British Library Selects Reynolds’s News and Miscellany for Inclusion in Digital Archive | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo and Jessica Elizabeth Thomas. Stephen Basdeo a writer and historian based in Leeds, UK and Jessica Elizabeth Thomas is a Ph.D. student at the University of Chester. A couple of months ago Jessica Elizabeth Thomas and Stephen...

LONDON, BABY!

Meta Notebook 2 (2 Meta 2 Notebook) Last week, for the first time since I got AHRC funding just as a global pandemic hit, I finally managed to travel to The British Library to do some research! Just booking the research trip was an adventure in...
From: The Romantic Ridiculous on 3 Aug 2021

John Balshaw’s Jig – an update

I’ve recently been putting the final touches to my next book – my publication of my transcription of John Balshaw’s Jig, with the context around it too. The readers suggested somequite radical structural changes which I worked on before...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 23 Apr 2021

To Dye for! Colouring the Beard in the 19th Century.

Let’s face it, spotting that first grey hair can be a slightly depressing experience. Whatever age it chooses to arrive at, it signifies a step change in the body; a reminder of the ticking clock. For men, the first grey beard hairs are sometimes...
From: DrAlun on 5 Feb 2021

Trial by Combat

Like most Americans, I am outraged by the pillaging of the Capitol on Wednesday by a mob incited by the President of the United States and his personal lawyer, once a serious figure, now a joke, who called for “Trial by Combat”. Tears and...
From: streets of salem on 9 Jan 2021

The Ashburnham House fire

The British Library’s manuscript collection is built on that amassed by antiquarian Sir Robert Cotton in the early 17th century. Gifted to the nation in 1701, it was stored at Essex House on the Strand for several years before safety concerns led...
From: Mathew Lyons on 24 Nov 2020

The Quirky World of Victorian Shaving Patents!

A major theme of my forthcoming book Concerning Beards, about the history of beards, shaving and barbers between 1650-1900, is that of the gradual commercialization of shaving. As I’ve explored in other posts, the period after 1750 saw the increasing...
From: DrAlun on 7 Jul 2020

Sir Joseph Banks and the Medieval Icelandic Saga

In this article, our social media editor Matt Firth looks at the career of Joseph Banks (1743-1820), and the collection of Icelandic texts he left the British Library… For Australians, Joseph Banks (1743-1820) is a familiar name from our colonial...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 30 Oct 2019

The Witchfinder in Salem

As tragic and interesting as the Salem Witch Trials are, they are still somewhat limited in the scope of characters and duration. So in the constant and evolving effort to market anything and everything about them, a bit of cultural appropriation always...
From: streets of salem on 3 Oct 2019

Jigs

A couple of years ago I was sitting in the British Library calling up various documents that might be ballad-related, when I came across John Balshaw’s Jig. What really captured my interest was the fact that Balshaw apparently wrote the piece in...
From: Early Modern Ballads on 1 Sep 2019

A Treasury of Early Irish Literature – BL Manuscript Egerton 178

In this article, our editor Christina Cleary takes a look at BL MS Egerton 1782, a 16th century Irish manuscript that preserves Early Irish tales that have not otherwise survived the centuries… The vellum manuscript known as Egerton 1782, housed...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 11 Aug 2019

Lucas de Heere’s Wives and Daughters

In the mid-1560s, artist and writer Lucas de Heere moved to London from Ghent in the Low Countries.  In his time in England, he produced works for leading figures at court while working with and teaching aspiring painters.  After having...
From: Middling Culture on 20 Jun 2019

The John Webster #websterthon

  Title page of The Duchess of Malfi quarto In June 2019 the Shakespeare Institute in Stratford-upon-Avon, is celebrating another of Shakespeare’s contemporaries, John Webster, in the seventh of their marathon playreadings. Webster’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 7 Jun 2019

Happy 80th birthday, Sir Ian McKellen!

25 May 2019, the 80th birthday of Ian McKellen! I was recently lucky enough to catch his one-man show Ian McKellen on Stage at the Belgrade Theatre in Coventry. He’s performing this show up and down the country for most of the year, a feat that...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 25 May 2019

Shakespeare and the Europeans in Italy

Shakespeare and Italy Summer School With the equinox now passed and spring firmly under way here in the UK it’s time to look forward to the warmth of the summer. How better than to celebrate it with the charity Shakespeare in Italy’s wonderful...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 22 Mar 2019

Regulations and Realities: Standardizing Diets in British Prisons

By Jess Clark I was recently in the British Library, and among the sources that came across my desk was a small, thin text published in 1902: Manual of Cooking & Baking for the Use of Prison Officers. Compiled by Britain’s Prison Commission...
From: The Recipes Project on 26 Feb 2019

Review: Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War at the British Library

MGM, at its zenith in the 1940s, used to boast that it had more stars than there are in heaven on its roster. It’s a phrase that came back to me walking round the current, jaw-droppingly good exhibition at the British Library, Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms:...
From: Mathew Lyons on 6 Dec 2018

Rowlandson’s Characteristic Sketches of the Lower Orders at the British Library

One of the privileges of using technology is our ability to peruse original editions online. We no longer need to travel to major city and university libraries to hunt down sources, or travel to distant states and lands, although viewing Jane Austen’s...
From: Jane Austen's World on 18 Nov 2018

The stories manuscript tell: Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms

Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms is monumental. The British Library has become accustomed to putting on ‘blockbuster’ exhibitions that cram its gallery with items — and visitors — to the point of sensory overload: feasts for the eyes which...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.