The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "British Museum"

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Your search for posts with tags containing British Museum found 36 posts

Dress Hooks of the Middling Sort

We are grateful to Michael Lewis, Head of Portable Antiquities & Treasure at the British Museum, for this guest post on “dress hooks.” Identifying the ‘middling sort’ through their material culture is fraught with difficulties,...
From: Middling Culture on 14 Aug 2019

David Garrick at 3

A print of David Garrick as Richard III Events to mark the 300th anniversary of David Garrick’s birth have been taking place all year. Born in 1717, Garrick burst onto the London stage in 1841 in the role of Richard III. The Museum of London has...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 24 Nov 2017

Q&A with Coll Thrush

Today Coll Thrush speaks with The Junto about his most recent book, Indigenous London: Native Travelers at the Heart of Empire, which examines that city’s history through the experiences of Indigenous travelers—willing or otherwise—from...
From: The Junto on 12 Sep 2017

Winter Dress

Another distraction; it happens to me every time I venture into a digital archive. This time I was looking for Lutheran “cartoons” from the early sixteenth century, and somehow I ended up fixated on a critical caricature of women’s winter...
From: streets of salem on 15 Feb 2017

Another brilliant idea

I had a great idea, but not one so great that my foot fell off. Why not make a copy of the bracer in the British Museum?, I thought. It will be easy, I thought. I have the report with a nice clear drawing. Dalton, Antiquities Journal, Volume 2, 1922...

Drawing down the Moon

One artist whose work I have admired for quite a while but never really knew how to contextualize in a topical or thematic way is Samuel Palmer (1805-1881). He seems to be one of those people who was not of his time. I guess you would call him a Victorian...
From: streets of salem on 17 Sep 2016

Full of sound and fury: recording Shakespeare

An early gramophone There are few things that take people back to their past more effectively than sound recordings. Mostly, of course, it’s recordings of favourite songs. Last week Radio 4 broadcast a series of programmes entitled His Master’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 2 Dec 2015

Code, control, and making the argument in the Humanities

The case often made for humanists (and indeed librarians, archivists, et al) to learn some code is that with programming comes control. That is, control to do what is possible within the bounds of possibility and talent (as opposed to within the bounds...
From: cradledincaricature on 24 Jul 2015

Imitation

THOMAS GEN MADE THIS FOR LWBritish Museum, 1889,0930.5 This shoehorn is in the British Museum collection and to my mind is a clear imitation of Mindum’s work. Made by Thomas Gen, it was acquired by the museum in 1889 from the collection of Henry...

The Many & the One

How is a map a first draft of history?
From: The Junto on 15 Jun 2015

The Lincoln Magna Carta in the early 19th Century

In the first decade of the 1800’s, a centuries old copy of the Magna Carta was rediscovered in the archives of Lincoln Cathedral.   Cathedral Church at Lincoln exhibited 1795 by Joseph Mallord William Turner, exhibited 1795. (www.tate.org.uk)     Magna...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Apr 2015

Weekly Witch: Witches and Wicked Bodies – British Museum Exhibition 2014

  Someone at the British Museum did a great job in publicizing this exhibition last year (2014). Or maybe it was just that everyone who knew me thought fit to mention it. Either way, it was on my radar for quite some time before I dragged myself...
From: Witchcraft in Poland on 22 Mar 2015

Doing things in proxies for prints: trends in the British Museum Catalogue of Satires (1770-1830)

Since my last post on research using with the Catalogue of Political and Personal Satires in the British Museum (hereafter BMSat) as a dataset I’ve been working on various threads, including Named Entity Extraction (I hope to write about this in...
From: cradledincaricature on 10 Feb 2015

Metadata for all the British Museum Satires: part five

In my previous post I mentioned that the first thing I’d do as I embarked on research using metadata for satirical prints catalogued by the British Museum would be to try to distinguish whether the data I had represented the prints or the cataloguers,...
From: cradledincaricature on 17 Dec 2014

Metadata for all the British Musuem Satires: part two

Last week I received from the lovely people at the British Museum a subset of metadata for the Catalogue of Political and Personal Satires Preserved in the Department of Prints and Drawings in the British Museum the definitive – if far from comprehensive...
From: cradledincaricature on 16 Nov 2014

Metadata for all the British Museum Satires in one query

A feature of the British Museum collection database is that you can build a SPAQRL query to return the collection data in a different and machine readable form. So if you head to http://collection.britishmuseum.org/sparql and enter… PREFIX crm:...
From: cradledincaricature on 12 Nov 2014

Shakespeare and the memories of the German nation

The statue of Shakespeare in Weimar, Germany The British Museum is just about to launch its new exhibition Germany: Memories of a Nation.  Following a successful formula, the Museum’s Director Neil MacGregor has a Radio 4 series under way that...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 13 Oct 2014

Presenting Shakespeare’s Venice on stage

St Mark’s Square, Venice. Italian School The RSC recently announced its Summer 2015 season, beginning in March. They’ll be focusing on the Italian city Venice, with three plays that are fully or partly set there: The Merchant of Venice, Othello,...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 6 Oct 2014

How to Build a Universal Collection, or Nicknackatory

By James Hawkes The sheer immensity of Sloane’s collection poses a daunting challenge for the researcher, especially given its present division among different institutions. It might be useful to consider Sloane’s collection alongside smaller...
From: The Sloane Letters Blog on 20 Aug 2014

Live relays and encore showings: representing the live event

Vikings, life and legend A week or so ago I attended the live relay for Vikings: life and legend, the British Museum’s current blockbuster exhibition. I expected it to consist mostly of TV historians Bettany Hughes and Michael Wood walking us round...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 2 May 2014

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