The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "British Royal Family"

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Your search for posts with tags containing British Royal Family found 40 posts

The Funeral of King George III

King George III died on 29 January 1820 but it was to be a little over two weeks before his funeral took place on February 16, 1820, thus allowing time for everything to be put in place for such a grand event.  The funeral arrangements were made...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 Feb 2020

Christmas 1819

Well folks, today sees our final article for this year, in fact for this decade. We’ve had such a busy ten years, since starting All Things Georgian a few years ago, we’ve written over 550 articles on a whole host of subjects; researched and...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 Dec 2019

Prinny’s Brighton, Piccadilly by the Sea-side By Regan Walker

We are thrilled as always, to welcome back Regan Walker, whose latest book in the Agents of the Crown series, ‘Rogue’s Holiday‘ has just been released and for which there are further details of how to obtain a copy at the end of her...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 Nov 2019

The Royal Diets of George III and George IV

Unlike George IV, known for his excesses in all matters, his father was the complete opposite and abstained from any form of excess in the food department, so much so that even the newspapers felt obliged to write about it. George III was a creature...
From: All Things Georgian on 24 Oct 2019

The Gold State Coach

LONDON, January 8. Yesterday the old State Coach, built for King George I and the Carriages of his late Majesty, given by the late Master of the Horse to the Servants, were sold at Bever’s Repository; it is remarkable the Gold Lace of the State...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Jul 2019

The scramble for a royal heir

Although George III had 15 children, and all but two of them survived to adulthood, grandchildren – at least legitimate ones – were thin on the ground. In 1817, when the Prince Regent’s daughter, Princess Charlotte of Wales died in childbirth...
From: All Things Georgian on 2 Jul 2019

The First Duke of Edinburgh

In 1726, a new title was created in the peerage, the Duke of Edinburgh, and the recipient was Prince Frederick Louis, George I’s grandson. The new duke was second in the line of succession to the throne behind his father, George Augustus who was,...
From: All Things Georgian on 10 Jun 2019

King George III’s 70th birthday

King George III celebrated his 70th birthday on 4 June 1808. George III on on of Windsor Castle’s terraces; Peter Edward Stroehling; Royal Collection Trust The king was losing his eyesight and, because of this, wasn’t present at his birthday...
From: All Things Georgian on 4 Jun 2019

Princess Charlotte of Wales’ account books

Amongst the wonderful resource of the ‘George III Papers’ which are now in the public domain, we came across some early account books for the teenager, Princess Charlotte of Wales, which make fascinating reading. Perhaps it’s just us,...
From: All Things Georgian on 30 May 2019

The birth of the future Queen Victoria 25th May 1819

To mark the birth 200 years ago today of the future Queen Victoria we thought you might like to know a little more about the event itself. Interestingly, she was born on the same date as her paternal grandfather, King George III, whose birthday was later...
From: All Things Georgian on 24 May 2019

Princess Charlotte of Wales’ Russian dress, 1817

We recently ran a post on our Facebook page which shared images of Princess Charlotte of Wales in a blue Russian style dress. It proved really popular, so we thought we’d take the opportunity to look at the dress, and the portrait of Charlotte where...
From: All Things Georgian on 21 May 2019

The fête at Frogmore House, 19 May 1795

On Tuesday 19 May 1795, King George III held a grand fête at Frogmore House in the grounds of Home Park, Windsor and only around half a mile from Windsor Castle, celebrating both Queen Charlotte’s 51st birthday and the recent arrival and marriage...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 May 2019

How George III’s 1809 Golden Jubilee was celebrated in Bath

On the 25th October 1809, the jubilee of King George III was celebrated across the nation. Opinion was divided as to whether the jubilee had been celebrated a year too early; 25th October 1809 was the first day of the 50th year of George III’s reign,...
From: All Things Georgian on 25 Oct 2018

The review in Hyde Park attended by the Allied Sovereigns, 20 June 1814

The Tsar of Russia, the King of Prussia and other European sovereigns landed at Dover on the 6th of June 1814 for a visit lasting just over two weeks to celebrate the Peace of Paris and the abdication of Napoléon Bonaparte, who had been exiled...
From: All Things Georgian on 19 Jun 2018

The First Duke of Susse

In light of the news that His Royal Highness, Prince Harry, will become the Duke of Sussex upon his marriage to Meghan Markle, we thought we should take a brief look at the previous holder of the title. Prince Augustus, Duke of Sussex (1773-1843). Royal...
From: All Things Georgian on 19 May 2018

Windsor Castle in the Georgian Era

Having looked at the landau and royal weddings, how could we not report on Windsor Castle. So, we have some news for you from the Georgian Era. The Norman Gate and Deputy Governor’s House, Windsor Castle; Paul Sandby; Yale Center for British Art,...
From: All Things Georgian on 18 May 2018

Royal weddings in the Georgian era

On Tuesday 8th September 1761, in the Chapel Royal at St James’s Palace, the new King George III (he had ascended the throne a little less than a year earlier) married Princess Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. The wedding took place only a few...
From: All Things Georgian on 17 May 2018

The Death of Princess Charlotte 1796-1817

Prince George (later King George IV) and Princess Caroline’s daughter, Princess Charlotte, tragically died shortly after the birth of her still-born son on 6th November 1817. As the original ‘people’s princess’, we thought we would...
From: All Things Georgian on 6 Nov 2017

How George III’s Golden Jubilee, 1809, was celebrated in Lincolnshire

Following on from our previous post, the heroine of our new book, A Georgian Heroine, was a Mrs Rachel Charlotte Williams Biggs, and one of the many fascinating things she achieved in her life was that she virtually single-handedly and anonymously instigated...
From: All Things Georgian on 26 Oct 2017

The Ringers of Launcells Tower

The Ringers of Launcells Tower; Frederick Smallfield; Royal Institution of CornwallWe came across this piece of art whilst researching the heroine of our latest book, Mrs Rachel Charlotte Williams Biggs. The painting was inspired by a poem called ‘The...
From: All Things Georgian on 24 Oct 2017

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