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Your search for posts with tags containing British soldiers found 436 posts

The Speakman Chronicles, or, That Escalated Quickly

Last month, I said I didn’t know whom Christian Barnes was referring to when she wrote in June 1770 about “a young gentleman who has formilly headed the mob in Boston and now resides” in Marlborough.I’ve since figured out who that...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jul 2020

“Enraged upon reading Capt. Preston’s Narrative”

The publication of Capt. Thomas Preston’s “Case” in Boston in June 1770 heightened the danger that had prompted the captain to write to the British government in the first place: the possibility that he would be killed for the Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Jun 2020

Another Recovered Source on Bunker Hill

In late 1825 the historian Samuel Swett sent the Boston Daily Advertiser two accounts of the Battle of Bunker Hill sworn to before a Newburyport magistrate in 1818. I shared one yesterday.The other was undoubtedly published in the Boston Daily Advertiser...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jun 2020

Walpole on Young Washington

Horace Walpole, the son of British prime minister Robert Walpole and at the end of his life the fourth Earl of Orford, died in 1797. A quarter-century later, Baron Holland edited and published Walpole’s review of the 1750s, ultimately titled...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 May 2020

Lt. Jacob Rogers and the “Confusion” in Charlestown

One of the more unusual accounts of the start of the Revolutionary War came from Jacob Rogers, former commander of the Royal Navy ship Halifax.In 1774 Lt. Rogers left the navy (more on that eventually), married Anne Barber, and settled in her home town...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Apr 2020

The Story of the Soldier and the Spoons

In The Battle of April 19, 1775, Frank W. Coburn included this anecdote about the aftermath of the British march:About a sixth of a mile yet farther along, stood the home of Samuel Hastings, near the Lexington boundary line, yet within the town of Lincoln....
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Apr 2020

Some Out of Town Jasper

As I quoted yesterday, in 1853 a story surfaced saying that Josiah Waters, Jr., had delivered intelligence about the impending British army march on 18 Apr 1775.This story is significant in predating Henry W. Longfellow’s poem “Paul Revere’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Apr 2020

Was Josiah Waters Obtain the News of the British March?

Some accounts of the Battle of Lexington and Concord in April 1775 credit Josiah Waters of Boston with helping to provide intelligence about the British army’s plans to Dr. Joseph Warren. How did Waters enter the historical picture?Waters’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Apr 2020

“In like manner killed by two balls”

As discussed yesterday, there’s good evidence that Crispus Attucks was the first person shot at the Boston Massacre.There’s even stronger evidence that he was hit with two musket balls. The 12 Mar 1770 Boston Gazette reported that Attucks...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Apr 2020

“busily employd in communicating the Infection”

Another view of the smallpox epidemic in 1776. Having returned to Cambridge from Concord, HANNAH WINTHROP wrote to her friend MERCY OTIS WARREN in July after the British had evacuated Boston in March. Last Saturday afternoon we went into Boston the first...
From: In the Words of Women on 8 Apr 2020

Was Crispus Attucks Really the First Man Shot at the Massacre?

Another question about the Boston Massacre that I saw come up this Sestercentennial season is whether Crispus Attucks was really the first man to be killed in that event.Attucks is certainly remembered as the “First Martyr of Liberty,” as...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Apr 2020

“A number of Soldiers with their Baggage landed”

On Monday, 12 Mar 1770, Bostonians assembled for a town meeting to elect officers for the coming year and transact other business.In fact, there was so much other business that that meeting kept going by adjournment for over two weeks, with sessions starting:Monday,...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Mar 2020

Capt. Preston and the Town of Boston

On Monday, 12 Mar 1770, one week after the Boston Massacre, the Boston Gazette ran this letter:Boston-Goal, Monday, 12th March, 1770.Messieurs Edes & Gill,PERMIT me thro’ the Channel of your paper, to return my Thanks in the most publick Manner...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Mar 2020

The Departure of Commissioner John Robinson

Although the Boston Whigs indicted the Customs officer for the port of Gaspé; a passing notary; and a couple of bottom-level Customs employees for the Boston Massacre, those men weren’t their real targets.The anonymous person reporting on...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Mar 2020

Robert Patterson’s Memory of the Massacre

On 20 Mar 1770, 250 years ago yesterday, a sailor named Robert Patterson testified to his memory of the Boston Massacre.Patterson was one of the men wounded in that shooting—badly wounded in one arm. Furthermore, he had also been at the Christopher...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Mar 2020

The Troops’ Schedule for “embarkation for the castle”

One of the great things about the Sestercentennial of the Boston Massacre earlier this month is that I got to hear questions and new perspectives I could investigate. In the coming days I’ll go back over some of those points, starting with the question...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Mar 2020

The Boston Town Meeting Takes Action

On Tuesday, 13 Mar 1770, 250 years ago today, Boston took a couple of major steps in its official response to the Boston Massacre.The town had started its annual meeting the day before, reelecting the seven selectmen and then moving on to overseers of...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Mar 2020

David Lamson, a Middle-Aged Man of Menotomy

David Lamson was among the men from Cambridge who served in the French and Indian War, according to provincial muster rolls examined by local historian Lucius R. Paige. Lamson himself had some Native ancestry and probably some African since he was later...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Mar 2020

Hsiung on “The Metabolism of Military Forces,” 10 Mar.

On Tuesday, 10 March, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host a joint session of its Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar and Boston Seminar on Environmental History series.Prof. David Hsiung of Juniata College will present a paper on “The...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Mar 2020

“They all four were buried in one grave”

On the afternoon of Thursday, 8 Mar 1770—250 years ago today—Boston had a huge public funeral for the first four people to die after the Boston Massacre. This was only eleven days after the funeral for Christopher Seider, reportedly attended...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Mar 2020

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By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.