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Your search for posts with tags containing CHE found 2502 posts

Michel Montaigne

Michel MontaigneAnonymous (17th century).Michel Montaigne (1533–1592) was the proprietor of a vineyard and later a mayor of Bordeaux, France. However, his claim to fame in history is as popularizer of the writing form known as the essay. In 1580,...
From: Conciatore on 15 Jul 2019

This Week on Dispatches: Philip D. Weaver on the Court-Martial of New York Captain Joel Pratt

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor, independent researcher, and living historian Philip D. Weaver on the story of New York Captain... The post This Week on Dispatches: Philip D. Weaver on the Court-Martial...

Trail food bags & containers.

Trail Food Bags & Containers. "I have travelled with neere 200. of them at once, neere 100. miles through the woods, every man carrying a little Basket of this [Nokehick] at his back, and sometimes in a hollow Leather Girdle about his middle,...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 12 Jul 2019

Publication – Perspective : actualité en histoire de l’art. Les Pays nordiques no 2019 – 1

Perspective se tourne ici vers un vaste territoire – l’espace nordique européen, étendu au Danemark, à la Finlande, à l’Islande, à la Norvège et à la Suède – dont il s’agit...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 11 Jul 2019

July 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Gazette or Weekly Post-Boy (July 10, 1769). “No CURE No PAY.” As part of his marketing efforts, Mr. Hamilton, “Surgeon Dentist and Operator for the Teeth,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 10 Jul 2019

Kepler was wot, you don’t say?

  The Guardian is making a serious bid for the year’s worst piece of #histsci reporting or as Adam Shapiro (@tryingbiology) once put it so expressively, #histsigh! The article in question has the shock, horror, sensation headline: Groundbreaking...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 10 Jul 2019

A Wilkes Cufflink from Brunswick Town

Just a few hours after I posted about the archeological discovery of a tavern in Brunswick Town, North Carolina, a tweet from Warren Bingham alerted me to a new announcement from that team.One artifact when cleaned up turned out to be a cufflink ornamented...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jul 2019

Golden Yellow Glass

Yellow Neon Chandelier, 1995Dale Chihuly.(Columbus, Indiana Visitors Center). "Very few people know how to make colors like golden yellow and solid red well. These are difficult and troublesome in the art of glassmaking, since in making them you...
From: Conciatore on 8 Jul 2019

John Winstanley’s Robin Hood Poems

By Stephen Basdeo This article originally appeared on the IARHS Website) Rosemary Mitchell argues that during the eighteenth century, artists and writers when representing the medieval period did not strive for historical authenticity but instead sought...

A New Tavern Opened in Brunswick Town

Archeologists from East Carolina University announced that they are exploring the site of an eighteenth-century tavern in Brunswick Town, North Carolina, once capital of that colony. The building was located by a student using ground-penetrating radar....
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jul 2019

July 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Connecticut Journal (July 7, 1769). “Hugh Glassford … now carries on his Business, at Glen and Gregory’s.” Moving to a new location prompted Hugh Glassford,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Jul 2019

Versailles: a Bedroom of style

Photo tour!The Queen's bedroom at Versailles saw its fair share of lady occupants. The style of the furnishings rotated with the fashions, which were kept up for the ladies, naturally.  They could update the decor and commission works for the rooms...

This Week on Dispatches: Michael Gadue on Naval Strategies of the Saratoga Campaign

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews law professor and US Army officer Michael Gadue about naval strategies during the Saratoga campaign, including the construction of... The post This Week on Dispatches: Michael...

Kisses and Embraces in Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice by Rachel Dodge

Much has been said about proper greetings, curtsies, nods, and bows in Jane Austen’s novels, but familiar greetings that occur between close friends and family members are just as fascinating. In fact, a close inspection of the novels reveals more...
From: Jane Austen's World on 30 Jun 2019

Elizabethan Witch Trials: More Evidence (and a Map)

Posted by Krista J. Kesselring, 30 June 2019. Most of what we know of accusations of felony witchcraft in early modern England comes from the few surviving assize court records, supplemented by printed news pamphlets that detailed some such trials. Judges...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 30 Jun 2019

David Holmes, Timothy Barnard, and Questionable Loyalties

With the Revolutionary War in full swing by August 1776, George Galphin penned a letter to his nephew, Timothy Barnard. Galphin started his letter... The post David Holmes, Timothy Barnard, and Questionable Loyalties appeared first on Journal of the American...

The Paracelsans

Image of ParacelsusIn the late sixteenth century, the writings of an obscure physician started to become very popular around Europe. Born in 1493 with the name of Theophrastus von Hohenheim, "Paracelsus"[1] was the son of a German physician living...
From: Conciatore on 26 Jun 2019

The Duchess of Devonshire’s Public Breakfast at Chiswick House, 18

Today, we’re taking you back in time to a public breakfast given by Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire at the end of June 1802, at her villa, Chiswick House. Public it might have been, but entry was only for those ‘of note’ in the fashionable...
From: All Things Georgian on 25 Jun 2019

This Week on Dispatches: Michael J. Sheehan on the Battle of Stony Point

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews Michael J. Sheehan, contributor and senior historian at the Stony Point Battlefield State Historic Site, about misconceptions and... The post This Week on Dispatches: Michael J. Sheehan...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.