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Search Results for "Candide"

Your search for posts with tags containing Candide found 18 posts

Voltaire… True or false?

Art historians have developed sophisticated techniques to detect forgeries. Sotheby’s has its own ‘fraud-busting’ expert. Most of the world’s leading museums have whole departments devoted to distinguishing the real from the fake. Thanks to modern...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 13 Jan 2022

Candide revealed – a Voltairean oddity

Candide was published in 1759; 232 years later… Perhaps no other work of literature from the eighteenth century has entered popular culture to the extent achieved by Voltaire’s Candide. After a shaky start in 1956 Leonard Bernstein’s operetta,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 30 Sep 2021

‘The princely progress of the human race’: Guido Maria Brera’s new Candido

La Nave di Teseo, the François vase (Museo Archeologico, Florence). La nave di Teseo – The ship of Theseus: that is the name of the publishing house which brought out, no more than a few months ago, Guido Maria Brera’s latest novel: Candido. The...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 22 Jul 2021

Digitising Candide

Candide, title page of edition 299L (see OCV, vol.48, p.88). In what is arguably his most widely known work, Voltaire describes the extraordinary journey that his eponymous hero undertakes through geography and understanding, and for us digitising the...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 3 Sep 2020

Au programme des agrégations de Lettres en 2020: Zadig, Candide, L’Ingénu

Les ‘contes philosophiques’ de Voltaire sont aujourd’hui la partie émergée d’un iceberg aux multiples facettes. D’abord poète, mondain, tragique et épique, Voltaire a beaucoup écrit, dans...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 14 Nov 2019

Ceci n’est pas Candide…

Translating Voltaire: past and present In his study of Voltaire and England (1976), André-Michel Rousseau gives Voltaire’s contemporary translators short shrift. He dismisses most English translations of the contes out of hand. They are ‘platement...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 31 Oct 2019

Voltaire among the popes

The Avignon festival: July 2019 Walking through Urban V’s orchard-garden in the shadow of the Palais des Papes, I didn’t expect to find the faces of Voltaire and Madame Du Châtelet fluttering to the ground on a publicity flier. But...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 19 Sep 2019

Voltaire’s 18th century Candide — versus Bernstein’s 20th century Candide

Susan Engel as the aged and unappealing Cunegonde (a sort of old lady 2) at the close of a Swan Theatre, Stratford-upon-Avon Candide (2013), favorably reviewed by Paul Taylor (“astringent, nihilistic, dry”) Christa Ludwig as the old lady...
From: Ellen And Jim Have A Blog, Two on 12 Oct 2018

An American Voltaire: the J. Patrick Lee Voltaire Collection at McGill

Reblogged from McGill University Library News ‘Library Matters’, 9 May 2018. Published by Cambridge Scholars in 2009, with contributions by Nicholas Cronk and other Voltaire scholars. Pat Lee, who died in 2006, was a life-enhancing friend...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 24 May 2018

Leibniz: before and after Pangloss

Writing in 1751, Voltaire celebrated and yearned for the vibrancy of the previous decades when Europe had seemingly experienced an intellectual renaissance. This golden age, the ‘Age of Louis XIV’, as he came to term it in his eponymous historical...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 16 Dec 2016

Voltaire and the gardens of Versailles

Voltaire had known the Palace of Versailles since his thirties, when he prepared a divertissement there to celebrate Louis XV’s marriage in 1725. Some twenty years later he was a frequent visitor as Royal Historiographer. Yet when one consults...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 16 Jul 2015

Candide and Leibniz’s garden

Lucretia and Tarquin, by Simon Vouet. Schopenhauer unkindly wrote that the only merit of Leibniz’s Théodicée was that it gave rise to ‘the immortal Candide’.[1] The Théodicée does seem at least to have given rise to the subtitle of Candide,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 3 Feb 2015

The world’s a revolving stage

Voltaire wrote on most subjects under the sun but his particular area of expertise in his own eyes – and one about which he probably felt more entitled to offer an informed opinion than almost any of his contemporaries – was undoubtedly literature,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 20 Sep 2013

Tales from the Reading Room – Episode 40

Voltaire, Garrick and Shakespeare, September 6-9th and a man in a blue suit decorated with frogs….! Another week of connections and finding items in the collections with unexpected links! Readers frequently want discuss current productions with...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 7 Sep 2013

Nikolai Kopanev

We are very sad to learn the news of the death of Nikolai Kopanev, head of the Voltaire library in St Petersburg. We last had the pleasure of welcoming him to Oxford in 2009, as part of the celebrations of the 250th anniversary of Candide; more recently...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 12 Aug 2013

Pangloss, Guru of Positive Thinking: Candide at the Royal Shakespeare Company

Mark Ravenhill is now in his second year as Writer in Residence at the RSC. His latest play, Candide, ‘inspired by Voltaire’, is currently in rehearsal and opens at the Swan Theatre in Stratford on 29 August, where it will run until 26 October. The...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 6 Aug 2013

CANDIDE APP-EAL

Claire Trévien discussed in an earlier post the Candide iPad app which the Voltaire Foundation has produced in association with the Bibliothèque nationale de France and Orange. There have been over 7000 downloads since January, so if you haven’t seen...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 31 May 2013

The Online Republic of Letters

Welcome to the Voltaire Foundation’s first blog. We are the publishers of the first critical edition of Voltaire’s Complete Works, as well as monographs in the SVEC series touching on all aspects of eighteenth-century culture, history and literature....
From: Voltaire Foundation on 25 Apr 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.