The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Cartoons"

Showing 1 - 20 of 27

Your search for posts with tags containing Cartoons found 27 posts

A scene in the Crown & Anchor Tavern

“Fox and Sheridan (left) sit together at the head of a rectangular table on which is a punch-bowl, &c, looking with dismay at whigs (right), who advance to hurl their wigs at a large pile of wigs on the left (inscribed ‘The Heads having...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Mar 2019

The man wot drives the sovereign

A satire on the Duke’s pressure on the King to accept Emancipation. Wellington stands in profile to the right, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip and (as way-bill) a paper resembling the ‘Gazette’, headed ‘Bill’...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 22 Mar 2019

Puzzled which to choose!!

“An African chief displays to a naval officer three black women, who stand together (right), grinning and coy, and absurdly squat and obese, with huge posteriors like those of the Hottentot Venus (see British Museum satire no. 11577). The officer,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 14 Mar 2019

The man wot drives the sovereign

“Wellington stands in profile to the right, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip and (as way-bill) a paper resembling the ‘Gazette’, headed ‘Bill’ [i.e. for Catholic Relief]. His (gloved) left hand touches...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 20 Feb 2019

The party wot drives the sovereign

Queen Adelaide, side-saddle on a horse with a man’s face, Lord Grey, using spurs and a riding crop to press him into the ‘Slough of Despond’, joining other politicians including Wellington. Grey says, ” Don’t drive so hard;...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 10 Dec 2018

The cad to the man wot drives the sovereign

“Peel stands directed to the left holding a dome-shaped wire cage containing rats; his left hand is on his hip. He wears a small battered hat, once a topper, a collar and stock, patched greatcoat with sheepskin collar and many pockets; loose boots...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 20 Nov 2018

The theatrical atlas

Kean as Richard III, directed to the left, stands on a large volume with the word ‘Shakespear’ written on the top edge. Resting on his head and humped shoulders is a model of Drury Lane Theatre, a massive block, inscribed ‘Whitbreads...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 16 Nov 2018

Old Nick’s gatherings!

“he Devil, laden with Tories, strides to the left, quoting the Duke of Newcastle with a gloating grin: ‘Can’t I do what I like with MY OWN’ [see BM Satires No. 15884, &c.]. Across his shoulder is a trident on which a bloated...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 2 Nov 2018

JOIN, or DIE: Political and Religious Controversy Over Franklin’s Snake Cartoon

On May 9, 1751, Benjamin Franklin published a satirical article in the Pennsylvania Gazette commenting on British laws that allowed convicted felons to be... The post JOIN, or DIE: Political and Religious Controversy Over Franklin’s Snake Cartoon...

A sweep-ing reform among the clergy

Two policemen are shown arresting chimney sweeps, roughly pulling one by the arm and another pushing an adult chimney sweep away while carrying four little boys on his back or in his arm. Two chimney sweeps on the left and one on the right complain of...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 5 May 2017

Facetiae; being a general collection of the jeux d’esprits

“A list of new and popular works, published by William Kidd, No. 14, Chandos Street, West Strand”–Following illustrations in Cruikshank v. Agnew; or, A view of Sir Andrew Agnew’s bill for the better observance of the Lord’s...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 10 Apr 2017

The rat hunt

“The head and shoulders of the dog, who has a handsome collar inscribed ‘John Bull’, project into the design from the right. One paw presses down a rat with the head of Wellington, who looks up in anguish at the dog’s angry jowl....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 2 Mar 2017

Happy New 2017: on revision, a great classic on Audible, my next newsletter

  Happy New 2017! I like the feel of this year already. I’ve weaned myself — to some extent — from toxic international news and immersed myself in finishing the eighth draft of Moonsick, my YA novel about Josephine’s...
From: Baroque Explorations on 5 Jan 2017

Boroughmongers’ attack on the British column

The opponents of parliamentary reform, including Wellington and Peel, attempt to pull down a column topped by Lord John Russell, a portrait of William IV on the plinth. The “Explanation of the engraving”: This spirited sketch was originally...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 2 Dec 2016

Croesus and Thalia

Print shows an ugly and leering elderly man, identified as the London banker Thomas Coutts, embracing the actress Harriet Mellon (later Mrs. Coutts, and subsequently Duchess of St. Albans). Printmaker: Rowlandson, Thomas, 1756-1827, printmaker....
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 21 Oct 2016

Johnny Bull and the Alexandrians

The citizens of Alexandria, Virginia, are ridiculed in this scene for their lack of serious resistance against the British seizure of the city in 1814. At left two frightened gentlemen kneel with hands folded, pleading, “Pray Mr. Bull don’t...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 15 Jul 2016

“Scary Sexual Devices” in PENTHOUSE!

I’m excited to announce that my article on “Scary Sexual Devices from the Past” is featured in PENTHOUSE this month, no doubt killing the mood of readers everywhere! It’s a three-page spread which has been brilliantly illustrated...
From: The Chirurgeon's Apprentice on 19 Sep 2015

L0078325 A meeting of a Calves-Head Club for Whig gentlemen

L0078325 A meeting of a Calves-Head Club for Whig gentlemen: Quite a few political cartoons available from the Wellcome Library too. This one’s from 1734. Gotta love all that text on the bottom to spell out the meaning of the image.

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