The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Carver"

Your search for posts with tags containing Carver found 10 posts

Stephen Carver’s “Author Who Outsold Dickens” (2020): Biography of a Crime Novelist

By Stephen Basdeo When I was doing my MA dissertation on the cultural history of crime, my supervisor, Dr Heather Shore, advised me to read two now largely forgotten novels: Rookwood (1834) and Jack Sheppard (1839). The heroes of these two novels, respectively,...

January 21

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Every lover of his country will encourage … American manufactures.” Benjamin Randolph, one of Philadelphia’s most prominent and successful cabinetmakers,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Jan 2020

Opium; or, How it Became a “Dirty Drug”

By Stephen Basdeo We live in an era in which, increasingly, governments in many western countries are realising that they are losing the so-called “War on Drugs”. Some countries have completely decriminalised certain substances, while in some...

Review: “The 19th-Century Underworld: Crime, Controversy & Corruption” by Stephen Carver

By Stephen Basdeo Everyone nowadays seems fascinated by the Victorian criminal underworld. From Ripper Street to Peaky Blinders, it seems people cannot get enough of murdered sex workers and brutal yet gentlemanly gangsters. We all now know the tropes:...

May 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (May 12, 1767).“Gilding and all the branches of house and furniture carving.” John Lord earned his living as a carver and...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 May 2017

December 23

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? South-Carolina Gazette and Country Journal (December 23, 1766).“CARVER’S Wharf, at Gosport.” Most eighteenth-century advertisements – whether promotions...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 23 Dec 2016

September 4

What was advertised in a colonial newspaper 250 years ago today? Pennsylvania Gazette (September 4, 1766).“JAMES REYNOLDS, CARVER and GILDER, … UNDERTAKES to execute all the various Branches of Carving and Gilding.” James Reynolds,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Sep 2016

The Impact of Jonathan Carver’s Journal and Maps

Captain Jonathan Carver’s Reconnaissance Captain Jonathan Carver was hired in August 1766 as a surveyor and draughtsman by Major Robert Rogers, the newly appointed governor-commandant of British Fort Michilimackinac. Rogers instructed Carver to...

Polk and Carver Deliver Henry Purcell

Music appreciation continues at our house as my husband repaired his Carver receiver and bought some new deeply discounted Polk speakers. We played our new Rachel Podger CD (Guardian Angel) Saturday morning and then Mark wanted to test the system with...

The King's breakfast

Today, 2 August, is the 225th anniversary of a famous royal visit to Hartlebury Castle in 1788. George III had recently recovered from his first attack of illness and he and Queen Charlotte were staying in Cheltenham. Bishop Hurd, who was probably their...
From: The Hurd Library on 2 Aug 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.