The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Case studies"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Case studies found 28 posts

Virtual Office Hours

This past week, several of the archaeologists partnered up with the Bibliographical Society of America to offer a webinar on the uses of AOR for remote teaching and research. Many thanks to Erin Schreiner for including us in the series, as well as for...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 26 Mar 2020

School’s In Session

Notes on Juvenal’s Satires, a colored woodcut from a 1498 edition in the George Peabody Library  (Incun. 1498 J592) As the new academic year comes rolling in, we’re ready to hit the books again. We’ve added a few new elements to...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 10 Sep 2019

John Dee’s IDs

A signed note on the title page of Dee’s copy of the BaderbuchlinBlizzard aside, it was great to take AoR on the road for this year’s RSA in New Orleans. Some great conversations emerged from discussion of Dee’s books, both in and out...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 25 Apr 2018

Digitization and its discontents

In an earlier blog, Matt Symonds discussed some losses which are inevitably part of the process of digitization. The material aspects of books in particular – their size, weight, feel and, indeed, smell – are difficult or impossible to convey...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 9 Feb 2018

Dee’s Mistakes

How did John Dee make sense of what he was reading? We at AOR have the luxury of examining Dee’s annotations with the apparatus of stable critical editions, the extensive reserves of research libraries, and the even more capacious Google search...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 30 Jan 2018

Dee and his books

Summer or not, we are slaving away at the CELL office in order to transcribe all the annotations contained in the books which are part of our Dee corpus! This blog post, by Finn Schulze-Feldmann, one of the three research assistants involved in phase...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 31 Jul 2017

Diaspora/rhyme

For the past few days, I have gone down the rabbit hole of worldwide library catalogues in order to actualise the status quaestionis of Gabriel Harvey’s library. The last cohesive attempt dates back to Virginia Stern’s book Gabriel Harvey:...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 29 Jul 2016

Diaspora / rhyme

For the past few days, I have gone down the rabbit hole of worldwide library catalogues in order to actualise the status quaestionis of Gabriel Harvey’s library. The last cohesive attempt dates back to Virginia Stern’s book Gabriel Harvey:...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 29 Jul 2016

Swedes, Lawers, and Pi

Today I’d like to look at one of the especially tricky problems in transcribing Harvey, a symbol that has appeared twice so far in our corpus. It looks something like the letter Greek pi with a squiggle above it. The first text that contains this...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 1 Jul 2016

Swedes, Lawyers, and Pi

Today I’d like to look at one of the especially tricky problems in transcribing Harvey, a symbol that has appeared twice so far in our corpus. It looks something like the letter Greek pi with a wavy line above it. The first text that contains this...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 1 Jul 2016

Harvey reading verse

As mentioned earlier, the latest edition to the Harvey corpus is Thomas Tusser’s Fiue hundred pointes of good husbandrie (London, 1580), recently acquired by Princeton University Library. The book is different from the other books in the corpus...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 17 Jun 2016

Harvey reading verse

As mentioned earlier, the latest edition to the Harvey corpus is Thomas Tusser’s Fiue hundred pointes of good husbandrie (London, 1580), recently acquired by Princeton University Library. The book is different from the other books in the corpus...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 17 Jun 2016

Some Notes on Translating Harvey

Happy 2016 from the Archaeology of Reading! This week we are getting back into the swing of things, and to celebrate the new year, I thought I’d write another short post about the challenging (though fun) world of translating Harvey’s marginalia....
From: Archaeology of Reading on 12 Jan 2016

From Orient to Occident Part II: Acupuncture in Victorian England

N.B. This is the second half of a two-part series on acupuncture in Victorian England.  If you haven’t already done so, I’d recommend checking out Part I first.Just to quickly recap, in the first post I discussed:1)     ...

Surgeons at War

Invasive operations – its accompanying pains and potential complications – gave early modern surgeons and surgery a somewhat negative reputation.  Surgeons belonged to an ignoble profession, one joke noted, because they made a living “by the...

Midwifery II: The Battle for Authority

You may want to check out Midwifery I before continuing... How did the authors present themselves and their practice?  And second, how did they present practitioners of the opposite gender?  Male authorsThe male authors of the English treatises...

‘Converted to a cat’

The most famous apocyrphal cat of the Renaissance?**Petrarch’s mummified cat at Casa del Petrarca. In honour of World Cat Day, I did a quick search on the fabulous Early English Books Online to see if cats were ever described as agents of conversion,...

‘Go your ways for an Apostata’: the converting Courtesan

van Honthorst, Smiling Girl, a Courtesan, Holding an Obscene Image, 1625 I’m really delighted to have been given the chance to contribute to the Dutch Courtesan project, an all-singing, all-dancing (and all-acting) web resource that has accompanied...

Picture of a reading table?

A couple of days ago, I wrote a post about Bess of Hardwick’s reading. What I didn’t mention there was the description of the table on which Bess kept her books. According to the 1601 inventory of Hardwick, Bess’s books sat in her bedchamber,...

A book that converted…

As part of the work of putting together the ‘Virtue and Vice’ exhibition, I got to return to a question that has fascinated me for a long time: women’s reading in the early modern period. Though moralists fulminated against the perils...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.