The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Change"

Showing 1 - 20 of 180

Your search for posts with tags containing Change found 180 posts

Séance du séminaire Collection : « Carl Jacobsen et la collection française de la Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek à Copenhague », 22 septembre 2020 (en ligne)

En ligne, 18h30-20h00 Intervenant : Nicholas Parkinson (Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek) À l’entrée du musée copenhaguois Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, une sculpture occupe le devant de la scène – Gloria Victis, ou « gloire...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 11 Sep 2020

Revisiting Christopher Heaney’s How to Make an Inca Mummy

In this last “revisiting” post in our August 2020 series, we return to a piece by Christopher Heaney in 2016 to learn about sixteenth-century Europeans and their use of the dead in medical recipes. Practitioners believed that preserved bodies...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Aug 2020

Revisiting Carla Nappi’s “Translating Recipes 1: Narrating Qing Bodies”

Editor’s Note: Today we revisit a classic post from our archives on Late Imperial China by Carla Nappi, which sits the intersection of medicine and storytelling. “Narrating Qing Bodies” kicked off an extended series of translations and...
From: The Recipes Project on 23 Apr 2020

Letter, 18th April 1840: to John Russell Smith

Great Totham Hall near Witham April 18th 1840 Dr Sir, Just as it always is! I now find that I shall not be able to send you the promised parcel of “Bokes” for a fortnight from their time! “What a fellow that Clark is!” methinks...
From: Finding Charles Clark on 16 Apr 2020

Margaret Lendall, fl. 1660-1668

Margaret Lendall was a Haberdashers’ Company apprentice milliner/lace-seller who worked on the Royal Exchange in 1660s London. Robert White, The Royal Exchange of London, 1671 © The Trustees of the British Museum, 1880,1113.3683 In October...
From: A Fashionable Business on 20 Mar 2020

Mary Bassett (fl. 1693-1712)

Mary Bassett was a milliner and tenant of the upper floor or ‘pawn’ of the Royal Exchange at the turn of the eighteenth century. Figure 1 shows her name recorded in tax assessments as the tenant of ‘a Shopp’ in the ‘exchange...
From: A Fashionable Business on 11 Feb 2020

January 31

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “For SPAIN, PORTUGAL, LONDON … The SHIP MARY.” Deciphering the copy in these advertisements may be difficult or even impossible, but the visual images remain...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 31 Jan 2020

History and the Climate Emergency, Or: Tradition to the rescue of Progress

Olivier Guimond Participating in panels on history and heritage in recent weeks has given me pause to reflect on the relevance of the historical discipline to the climate emergency and climate change. The two events on which these reflections are based...
From: Borealia on 27 Nov 2019

L’histoire et l’urgence climatique, Ou la tradition à la rescousse du progrès

Olivier Guimond L’assistance à quelques panels portant sur l’histoire et le patrimoine dans les dernières semaines m’a donné à réfléchir sur la pertinence de la discipline historique dans un...
From: Borealia on 27 Nov 2019

British? Or European?: George III’s dinner table and the taste of the nation, 1788-1801

By Rachel Rich and Lisa Smith If we are what we eat, and the king is the father of the nation, then George III’s menus must have something to tell us about who the British people were at the end of the eighteenth century, as Britain moved from early...
From: The Recipes Project on 12 Nov 2019

Variable Matters (Basel, 20-22 September 2019), organized by Barbara Orland and Stefanie Gänger

By Stefanie Gänger Hosted at Basel’s beautiful Pharmacy Museum, the conference “Variable Matters” was designed to bring together historians with an interest in the movement of medicinals and knowledge about them between and...
From: The Recipes Project on 5 Nov 2019

Macbeth @ Manchester Royal Exchange

For about half an hour before the Royal Exchange’s Macbeth started, the atrium of the Royal Exchange was rocked by rumbles and explosions, which became increasingly unsettling as the start time drew near. Christopher Haydon’s production –...
From: The Bardathon on 10 Oct 2019

Colloque: La France en Italie. Artistes et œuvres français en Italie à l’époque gothique

Université de Lausanne – Site de Dorigny 14-15 novembre 2019 La France en Italie. Artistes et œuvres français en Italie à l’époque gothique Les échanges culturels entre la France et l’Italie ont...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 15 Sep 2019

Human Waste and Wasted Humans: Flotsam and Jetsam in the Anthropocene

Slaves in the Hold of the Albanoz (1846) by Lt. Francis Meynell © National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London Shortly after midnight on March 18, 1973, the Zoe Colocotroni, an oil tanker commissioned by Mobil Oil Company, ran aground off the southwest...
From: The 18th-Century Common on 8 Jul 2019

Thoughts for the week By Ron Owen of Owen Guns. 15th May 2019

Thoughts For The Week.“What you do in your lifetime will echo down through eternity”,Marcus Aurelius.Is it About Suppression?On the 18th of May we have choices to make in our Federal Election. There are two choices, two examples of people...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 14 May 2019

Tales from the Archives: Drinkable Gold for the King of Siam

In my first months of co-editing duties here at The Recipes Project, one of my many delights has been the opportunity to dig back in our archives to rediscover posts I’ve loved over the years, to see them with fresh eyes. As a historian of Japan,...
From: The Recipes Project on 11 Apr 2019

“Daily Recipes for Home Cooking” (1924)

Nathan Hopson This is the second in a planned series of posts on nutrition science and government-sanctioned recipes in imperial Japan. Imagine a national cookbook. What would that look like? What would it say about the values and ideology of the society...
From: The Recipes Project on 4 Apr 2019

British Beef, French Style: Robert May’s Braised Brisket

By Marissa Nicosia This recipe was developed by Marissa Nicosia for the Folger Shakespeare Library exhibition, First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas (on view Jan 19–Mar 31, 2019), produced in association with Before...
From: The Recipes Project on 28 Mar 2019

Something to Share: Food from Home to Home

By Megan Daigle, with Maria Wilby and Iman Mortagy Food brings people together. That simple idea is what underpins Something to Share, a cookbook produced in 2018 by Refugee Action—Colchester, a small but mighty voluntary organisation that works...
From: The Recipes Project on 26 Mar 2019

Page 1 of 9123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.