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Search Results for "Charles Adams"

Your search for posts with tags containing Charles Adams found 16 posts

“Signally marked by idleness dissipation & intemperance”

Yesterday I quoted two letters that relatives of Charles Adams wrote at the end of May 1789, discussing his predilection to get into trouble at Harvard College. Meanwhile, in Cambridge Prof. Eliphalet Pearson wrote the following entry into his “Journal...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Sep 2019

“I have many anxious hours for Charles”

In early 1789, as I’ve been chronicling, Charles Adams had a couple more run-ins with the authorities of Harvard College. Even though those incidents didn’t appear on the official faculty minutes or Charles’s permanent record, word got...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Sep 2019

“A snow ball was sent against the chapel windows”

As I wrote back here, in December 1788 Harvard professor Eliphalet Pearson began to keep a “Journal of disorders &c.” It’s possible Pearson had assembled a similar notebook previously and it just doesn’t survive. But I think...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Sep 2019

“A company from Bradish’s caused disorders at College”

In discussing Charles Adams’s final semester at Harvard, I must now introduce the setting of the Blue Anchor Tavern in Cambridge.Located at what’s now the intersection of Mount Auburn and J.F.K. Streets, the Anchor Tavern was run for decades...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Sep 2019

“Perswaded that Charles did not deserve the suspicions”

The Harvard College Thanksgiving banquet in November 1787 ended badly. By the evening, window glass and wooden benches were lying on the ground outside the hall. That might have had something to do with how every student had brought a bottle of wine.The...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Sep 2019

“Charles has been guilty of a trick”

On 26 May 1786, John Adams wrote from London to his eldest son, congratulating John Quincy Adams on getting into Harvard College: Give me leave to congratulate you on your Admission into the Seat of the Muses, our dear Alma Mater, where I hope you will...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Sep 2019

Sorting Out the Adams Boys at Harvard

I started my look at Charles Adams’s experience at Harvard College with a posting on how his aunts clustered around and made sure he had furniture for his dorm room. (His parents were far off in Britain.)It’s only natural then to wonder how...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Sep 2019

Prof. Pearson’s “Journal of disorders”

In late December 1787, the Harvard College faculty did some house-cleaning. It was the end of an academic term, the end of the calendar year, and time to address some problems. Early in the month the college president, professors, and tutors had fined...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Sep 2019

A Thanksgiving Dinner Gone Wrong

I’m looking at Charles Adams’s disciplinary record as a student at Harvard College in the late 1780s. In the spring of 1787, Charles was fined six shillings for hosting a noisy gathering in his dormitory room. A year before, John Adams had...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Sep 2019

“At the chamber of their Classmate Adams”

In digging into the ways that Charles Adams broke the rules of Harvard College, I’m skipping the many times he was punished for being absent or tardy from prayers and recitations. Those were minor offenses that the college usually dealt with in...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Sep 2019

The Adams Brothers at Harvard College

For a year in the late 1780s, all three sons of John and Abigail Adams were students at Harvard College.The first to enter was the middle son, Charles, born in 1770. I described the many little challenges of equipping him for dormitory life in the summer...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Sep 2019

“Caught running naked across Harvard Yard”?

Last week I wrote about Charles Adams, John and Abigail’s second son, starting at Harvard College in 1785. Charles turned out to be the biggest disappointment of that generation, and the trouble started in college, but I had trouble nailing down...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Sep 2019

Moving into a Harvard Dormitory in 1785

At this time of year young people are settling in at college, including my godson at Cambridge. So I’m looking at the process of entering college in 1785.Fifteen-year-old Charles Adams started at Harvard College that year. His parents, Abigail and...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Aug 2019

“‘Nae Luck aboot the House” in Braintree

Gwen Fries at the Massachusetts Historical Society highlighted how Abigail Adams came to love a particular Scottish song while her husband John was far away in France. On 13 Dec 1778, after describing lonely winter nights, Adams wrote:I cannot discribe...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 May 2019

The Last Years of Baron de Steuben

When we left the retired general Friedrich Wilhelm von Steuben, usually then known as Baron de Steuben, his first postwar housemates had left him as well.Those were three of his former military aides: Benjamin Walker, James Fairlie, and William North....
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Jul 2018

A Request to John Adams

In the same long letter from Abigail Adams that I quoted yesterday, she included these personal messages from the children to their father:Our little ones send Duty to pappa. You would smile to see them all gather round mamma upon the reception of a letter...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jul 2014

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.